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Author Topic: Pre-school study plan  (Read 6609 times)

dta

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #50 on: June 16, 2004, 02:14:22 PM »
As soon as a current student gets on here and tells me that it worked for them, that they tried this method and felt much better prepared and got better grades than their classmates...then I'll put more faith in this method.  Until then, hearing a bunch of other pre-law students go on and on about how much it helps does nothing to convince me.  I've heard too many current students tell me not to study any before school, seems like too common of a theme not to listen to.

Unless LEEWS is just completely fabricating their evidence, they have lots of student who write them and tell them how much better they did after taking LEEWS and how they wished they did it before entering law school. Visit leews.com. There's the evidence you requested.

dta

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #51 on: June 16, 2004, 02:17:21 PM »
I think freaking out and spending hours studying for 1L classes is crazy, you're prob. learning things wrong or at the very least-not the way your prof. is going to want it.  So chill out, pick up a few fun books you've been meaning to read and have some fun before school starts!!

I really don't understand why you have to characterize anyone who studies outlines before law school as "freaking out". Maybe those of us who choose this route actually enjoy reading these outlines and prep materials just as much as you enjoy reading "A Civil Action". Really, it's totally unfair to characterize those who choose to study in this way.

GA_Kristi

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #52 on: June 16, 2004, 02:29:27 PM »
Sorry, I want real people (or as close as I can get on here), not some blurb the book or website chose to publish.  I have two good friends currently in law school, one at Harvard and one at Georgia State.  Both told me not to study before school, just to relax.  They don't even advocate that I read anything law related, but I could never do that, so I've read all the usual pre-law school books.  The one at Harvard is in the top 10% of his class and summer associate at two top D.C. firms, the other is in the top 25% at Georgia State.  Both went to undergrad with me and were in my major, so that makes me feel at least somewhat good about how our undergrad prepared us.  I know law school is nothing like undergrad, but we went to a small private liberal arts college with classes of 5-20 people and our education was far different from what I experienced at the large state school I went to my first year.

Anyhow, back to the topic...They, along with others whose class ranks and such I'm not sure on, have all said that those who study too much before law school will burn out.  (Someone said before that you should just get used to the burnout because it continues all your career.  Well, that it does...I just finished 3 years at a firm where the partner I was assigned to had a nervous breakdown 10 years into practice.)  And why is it that you never hear a law professor advocating that you study up before classes start?  You would think it would make their job easier if you came in prepared and knowledgable.

I think doing any sort of preparation (including reading this board) gives you a little bit of a leg up on others who do nothing.  Being familiar with the experience makes you confident and has to make the transition easier.  However, my whole point has been that the method defined by PLS II is a little too intense and more than I think anyone needs to do prior to law school.  Perhaps I'm wrong, but lucky for me I'm going to a little t4 and I don't think there will be quite so many well-prepared "gunner" type people there who will blow me out of the water because they prepared so much better.  I'm prepared to not be in the top of my class, but I sure as hell am gonna work my butt off to get there.

I hope this method works for you all, to each his own.  There seem to be such a variety of methods to prepare for law school I'll be curious to see what those at the top of my class did pre-law school.  I know the girl that I have talked to the most about my particular law school graduated 4th in her class a couple of years ago.  She said she never even read a casebook, only commercial outlines and attended these review sessions at the end of the semester that a company put on at the school.  So, obviously some people just have a natural talent for law school.  I'm prepared to work hard, but boy would it be nice to just float through like she did  :)

I'm done with this subject, like I said, to each his own.  I hope everyone on this board does as well as they have hoped to do and that everyone's hard work pays off!  :)   
"I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is the moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." - Vince Lombardi

grahamers

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #53 on: June 16, 2004, 02:36:07 PM »
I am not sure which book had this concept, but it made sense to me.  Maybe it was LSC.  The analogy is this:

Going through a semester at law school is like driving to a destination, but you don't know where you are going.  In your life when you have done this, which has been the more pleseant experience?

1. Jumping in the car with someone who knows where they are going and driving.  Letting them tell you, as you come upon each turn, "Turn here!"  When you get there, you have no idea how you got there or where you are in relation to other places.

2. Reviewing a map before you drive somewhere to get a feel of what you will be doing.  You still need your passanger to tell you where to turn, but now you have a general sense of where you are going and where the turns will be.

This is obviously meant to be a loose analogy, but as I said, it makes sense.  I am simply planning on reviewing some course outlines to see what subjects I will study in a class and the logical steps we will take during the class.  I am NOT fooling myself that I will be able to do some version of a legal coorespondants course to law black letter law before school.  I just want to "review the map" before I have to gte into the car.
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GA_Kristi

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #54 on: June 16, 2004, 02:42:05 PM »
grahamers - That's pretty much my plan too!
"I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is the moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." - Vince Lombardi

Findedeux

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #55 on: June 16, 2004, 02:43:32 PM »
 About the PLSII being too intensive, I completely agree with GA. You would have to slave away to finish it all. Not to mention that you might not even want to study the second semester courses because you would forget everything you studied after your first semester courses (though I am trying to do a little of second semester). However, 4-6 hours a day for someone (me) who has nothing else that need be done is a very leisurely rate. Burnout need not be a real worry if you have time like this (which GA has mentioned she doesn't).

grahamers

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #56 on: June 16, 2004, 02:44:13 PM »
grahamers - That's pretty much my plan too!

Seems to make the most sense to me.  I agree with AF's assertion in PLSII that nothing matters except the final exam, but I feel the best way to prepare for the final is to be generaly prepared for my classes.  Something I read in a hurry two months before school starts will not help me during my final exam.
34 years old    170 LSAT 2.33 UGPA
Accepted: Wake, Mason, Catholic, Maryland, Baltimore, WVU, Widener
Waitlisted: American
Dinged: GW, Georgetown
Still haven't heard from: Villanova
Attending Mryland

GA_Kristi

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #57 on: June 16, 2004, 02:54:46 PM »
About the PLSII being too intensive, I completely agree with GA. You would have to slave away to finish it all. Not to mention that you might not even want to study the second semester courses because you would forget everything you studied after your first semester courses (though I am trying to do a little of second semester). However, 4-6 hours a day for someone (me) who has nothing else that need be done is a very leisurely rate. Burnout need not be a real worry if you have time like this (which GA has mentioned she doesn't).

I think this is a nice way to finish this all off.  You're right, I do not have the time.  If I didn't work 50 or so hours a week then I might read a little more, I do like to be over-prepared!  :)  If I didn't have a job and could spend a few hours a day reading up, I might.  I just don't want to read TOO much and learn something wrong and then have trouble adjusting to the professor's way of thinking later.  In general though, I like to be overly prepared, so I'd probably be at least considering this method if I at all had the time.
"I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is the moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." - Vince Lombardi

jgruber

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #58 on: June 16, 2004, 02:59:43 PM »
I think class standing should be determined by multiplying your gpa by your age.  That will solve the problem.

sarahz

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Re: Pre-school study plan
« Reply #59 on: June 16, 2004, 04:58:29 PM »
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I really don't understand why you have to characterize anyone who studies outlines before law school as "freaking out". Maybe those of us who choose this route actually enjoy reading these outlines and prep materials just as much as you enjoy reading "A Civil Action". Really, it's totally unfair to characterize those who choose to study in this way.
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I dont think that looking at a few outlines makes you crazy. I think that people who start doing the reading for the first semester or people who start in on their outlines for the year are setting themselves up for problems.  You (the universal "you") have no idea what method or style your prof is going to have and you run a good chance of learning things incorrectly.  Also I have known many people who have gone through law school and by the end of the 1st sememster are totally burnt out...studying like crazy before school even starts is a sure fire way to burn yourself out before you even get there.  Beyond that, this is your last "real" summer...soon to be 1L's should be relaxing...not trying to understand civ. pro. outlines...get out, have fun...there will be plenty of reading to go around once school starts!