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elegantpearl01

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2005, 09:30:06 AM »
And the first black greek lettered sorority was founded at Howard University...Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority (1908)....Much love to the Beta Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha, their chapter is older than most other black greek lettered organizations and they represent their organization very well.


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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #21 on: July 10, 2005, 09:40:11 AM »
Growing up, I use to hear all kinds of stories from my dad and his line brothers about their days at howard. I kinda wish I went but I know things are different now.
Honesty has a beautiful and refreshing simplicity about it. No ulterior motives. No hidden meanings. An absence of hypocrisy, duplicity, political games, and verbal superficiality. As honesty and real integrity characterize our lives, there will be no need to manipulate others.--Chuck Swindoll

blk_reign

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #22 on: July 10, 2005, 11:07:38 AM »
 :D


Howard University: Mecca of Black education

IT is the richest Black educational institution in America, and one of the country's top research schools. Armed with a $312 million general endowment and a successful recruiting strategy that has attracted students who can hold their own with counterparts at prestigious White institutions, Howard University is experiencing one of the most successful periods in its 136-year history.

Having bounced back from a tight budget and low student and faculty morale, Howard has made strides in the last few years that, by many standards, have propelled it into ranks of the nation's elite schools. Top students from across the country and the world are now flocking to the university to major in one of the more than 120 areas of studies leading to undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees. The result has been unprecedented recognition for the Washington, D.C., university, which has produced two Rhodes Scholars, a Truman Scholar, six Fulbright Scholars, nine Pickering Fellows, one Miss USA, and a Nobel Peace Prize contender--and that's just in the last five years.


Long considered the Mecca of Black education, having produced leaders in virtually every area imaginable, Howard, on some lists, now ranks as one of the top 100 schools in the country, and the university's hospital as one of the 50 best nationwide. CEOs of Fortune 500 companies now line up to visit the campus, talk to students, teach classes and perhaps get first dibs on graduates.

One of 48 private universities (the only African-American university) supported mostly by funds from the U.S. Congress, the school now ranks as the 131st richest school (tops among Black institutions).

Howard has awarded more than 95,000 degrees. In fact, Howard produces more African-American Ph.D.s and MDs than any other university in the world. And with more than 3,000 faculty members, it has the largest concentration of African-American scholars in the world.

This year, Howard has 10,500 students enrolled in 12 schools and colleges, which include arts and sciences, business, communications, medicine, dentistry, divinity, pharmacy, nursing and allied health, social work, graduate school, education, engineering, architecture and computer sciences, and law.

For administrators, faculty, students and alumni, the national and international recognition being bestowed on their school only confirms what they have known all along: Howard produces graduates who not only have a high sense of cultural awareness and pride, but who are ready for cutting-edge careers in competitive areas of expertise.

Leading this push to higher ground is the university's president H. Patrick Swygert. For Swygert, who left his president post at the State University of New York (Albany) in 1995 to come to Howard, his mission is two-fold: Never forget Howard's steep history, but also never get so caught up in it that he doesn't adequately prepare the school for the ever-changing future. "I feel a tremendous sense of responsibility to those who come before me, and an even greater responsibility to those who come after me," he says. "One challenge is to continue to convince our community that if you attend Howard University or an HBCU, your child has a full opportunity to be successful, both in terms of human growth and potential, and professional growth and potential in this society."

Swygert points to such notable Howard alumni as Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, Emmy Award-winning actress Phylicia Rashad, singer Jessye Norman, actress-producer Debbie Allen, Dr. LaSalle Leffall, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, L. Douglas Wilder, and former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young.

Wayman Smith, chairman emeritus of the Board of Trustees, says he's very pleased with Howard's progress. "The school is on a track where it is competing with some of the top schools in the country," he says. "We are in a competitive environment. Howard has always been the pinnacle, the capstone of education in the African-American community. What has not been quite as self-evident is how well Howard University is competing against all other universities. When our students graduate, they can compete with anybody who graduated from any other school. We must continue that growth."

Award-winning actor, activist and Howard alumnus Ossie Davis says the school is an "outstanding university. It's a first-class university, one of the premiere educational institutions in the country," he says. "Howard is one of those bastions that define us, articulate our point of view, defend our interest."

In addition to educating its students, Howard has always had roots in civic-minded activism. That continues today with highly public stands taken recently by students on such issues as affirmative action and the crisis at historic Morris Brown College. "We are committed to the agenda of the African-American community nationally and worldwide," Swygert says. "For us, it's not simply about our doing well. But it's doing well with a purpose. It's a very old vision, but one that I want to build upon. It's not just about bricks and mortar. It's about purpose. I'd like to think that it's a live vision. It's not a static one."

The Howard vision began in November 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War when a group of ministers and abolitionists, Black and White, persuaded Congress to address the needs and aspirations of the freedmen. The institution was named for General Oliver O. Howard, the commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. The first class of four students graduated in 1870. The first Black president was the legendary Mordecai Johnson, who was inaugurated in 1926.

It wasn't until 1928 that Congress authorized an annual federal appropriation to Howard for construction, development, improvement and maintenance. Today, 35 percent of Howard's annual budget comes from the Federal Government, which still leaves a great need for additional funds. In recent years, President Swygert has instituted several cost-cutting measures at the university and initiated a $250 million campaign. President Swygert says that although "Howard is a national university chartered by the U.S. Congress," federal support "does not meet all our needs as the only HCBU designated in the highest research category. We must call upon our alumni and friends for the additional resources needed to finance scholarships, fellowships and endowed chairs for our students and faculty."

University officials say African-Americans are increasingly responsive to their appeals. At the last Charter Day Celebration, 10 African-Americans gave $1 million apiece. Eight, including Chairman Frank Savage and President Swygert, were alumni.

The university received a tremendous boost recently when Johnson Publishing Company Publisher and Founder John H. Johnson donated $4 million to the university for the building of a new School of Communications. Founded 31 years ago, the School of Communications is one of the largest at Howard, and graduates the largest number of Black communications majors in the country. The new high-tech building, scheduled to break ground next year, will be named in honor of Johnson, a journalism pioneer who started his first magazine, Negro Digest, 61 years ago, and published the first issue of EBONY magazine 58 years ago.

"I have been a big admirer of Howard ever since I attended the first NAACP meeting in Baltimore when Thurgood Marshall was named assistant counsel," Johnson says. "I knew that he was a Howard graduate, and I have been so inspired by the marks that he and so many other alumni have made on this nation. I am honored to make a contribution that will help to continue the great journalism tradition to which I have dedicated my life."

Jannette Dates, the dean of the School of Communications, says Johnson's gift will permit the school to move forward at a much faster pace than expected. "We are so excited to be able to break ground," she says. "We've worked about four years on curriculum, and deciding what we wanted in the new building. We want students to be prepared," she continued, "to be competitive when they get out of here."

Another area of study Howard takes pride in is its School of Business. One of the first accredited business schools in Washington, D.C., it trains students to go out and make a place for themselves in the world of business. In addition to strenuous academic courses, the school hosts executives from more than 200 companies each year.

Many Fortune 500 companies, such as General Electric, J.C. Penney, Goldman Sachs and Chase Manhattan, have adopted the business school, agreeing to hire interns and recruit graduates. A dozen or so companies also give the business school $100,000 each year. Striving to be one of the best business schools in the country, the school only admits about 100 students each year. "We have the cream of the crop," says School of Business Dean Barton Harvey. "We want to be known for being tough and innovative."





I don’t understand that blk_reign. Why do people call Howard “the mecca” when clearly the AUC (Atlanta University Center) is the Mecca of black intellectual power and prestige: Morehouse College (Ranked #1 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row)  , Morehouse Theological Seminary, Morehouse Medical School, Spelman College (Ranked #2 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row. #1 for black women obviously) , Clark Atlanta University,  and Morris Brown College. I mean come on now. When we have homecoming in the AUC we do it real big. Perhaps Howard is a mecca...but, it's not the mecca. F*ck HOWARD!

BLSD- Check out some 2004 Morehouse Homecoming Pics:
http://vipphotos.net/gallery/homecoming10302004
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

blk_reign

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #23 on: July 10, 2005, 11:07:57 AM »
Howard recruits more National Achievement Scholars than any school in the country. "Howard continues to fulfill its historic mission," Elijah Cummings, chair of the Congressional Black Caucus and Howard alumni, said while making the keynote speech at Howard's spring convocation. "I commend Howard University for the values of social justice and inclusion that are the center of [the school's] charter. These aspirations are the true vocation of America."


President Swygert says it will take a team effort to continue the progress. "It takes alumni: They have to feel good about their experience and tell others, and they have to be successful," he says. "It takes the faculty We have outstanding faculty who are competitive in their disciplines with other faculty located elsewhere. It takes students who are here today. They have to feel that they are fully engaged."

Cornell R. Williamson, president of the Howard University Student Association, says he will always treasure his time at Howard. "I love Howard University; specifically I love the students," says the graduating senior. "We are very passionate people. We're here to seek an education and utilize that education, not so much to fit in and have the luxury, items, but to utilize that to help those who come behind us. Just the aura you feel when you step on the campus is so much different than anywhere else you go. As an African-American student, you feel accepted, you feel welcomed, you feel at home. It's a family atmosphere."

Williamson says it's no accident that the university has consistently produced leaders in every field. "When you go to Howard University, you are automatically filled with that spirit that you can accomplish anything. It's because you see African-Americans in every capacity," he says. "It fills you with the motivation. Once you have that inspiration and knowledge that you can do it, there's nothing left but to achieve it."

University officials tout the school as a major research university where faculty and students seek answers to major problems affecting the Black community. The school recently established the National Human Genome Center, the only center of its kind at an African-American university. School administrators hope the center will produce cutting-edge research in the areas of DNA and genetics. The high-tech push by the university even extends to the School of Medicine, where future doctors are getting experience in procedures that promise to shape the future of health care. "We're modernizing the curriculum, the way we teach," says Dr. Floyd Malveaux, dean of the School of Medicine. "We see in the future physicians who will become more independent learners. We want to be on the forefront in technology."

Two of the university's newest buildings--the Louis Stokes Health Sciences Library and the School of Law Library--deliver on that research theme. Both are digital and conducive to labor-intensive study. Much of the university is connected to a wireless infrastructure, allowing students more mobility and flexibility in their learning. The school dormitories are now wired for the Internet and cable television.

"Howard has all of the attributes of a major research university in terms of facilities, equipment, faculty support, student support. This isn't a second-rate institution. You're not going to be impaired or sacrifice your career if you come to Howard," says Swygert, who, during his first years in office, directed the installation of computers in all dormitories and for all full-time faculty members. "If a student comes here, he or she will be with like-minded people, supportive people, and get a great education. At Howard, we recruit some of the best and brightest African-American students and faculty in the country. They are going to expect not to be disadvantaged in terms of resources and facilities. So we have to deliver."



We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

jdohno

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #24 on: July 10, 2005, 11:27:40 AM »
After that article about Howard from blk_reign, I had to find the numbers since you claimed that Morehouse is the #1 HBCU. In US News' rankings of colleges, it looks like Spelman gets that honor with Howard being second. Howard is ranked #90 under the national universities which is a big increase then where they used to be. Spelman is ranked #65 under the liberal arts colleges. And Morehouse in ranked as a tier 3 liberal arts college.  :(


I don’t understand that blk_reign. Why do people call Howard “the mecca” when clearly the AUC (Atlanta University Center) is the Mecca of black intellectual power and prestige: Morehouse College (Ranked #1 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row)  , Morehouse Theological Seminary, Morehouse Medical School, Spelman College (Ranked #2 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row. #1 for black women obviously) , Clark Atlanta University,  and Morris Brown College. I mean come on now. When we have homecoming in the AUC we do it real big. Perhaps Howard is a mecca...but, it's not the mecca. F*ck HOWARD!

BLSD- Check out some 2004 Morehouse Homecoming Pics:
http://vipphotos.net/gallery/homecoming10302004

blk_reign

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #25 on: July 10, 2005, 11:29:47 AM »
I think that HBC was going by the rankings of Black Enterprise Magazine

After that article about Howard from blk_reign, I had to find the numbers since you claimed that Morehouse is the #1 HBCU. In US News' rankings of colleges, it looks like Spelman gets that honor with Howard being second. Howard is ranked #90 under the national universities which is a big increase then where they used to be. Spelman is ranked #65 under the liberal arts colleges. And Morehouse in ranked as a tier 3 liberal arts college.  :(


I don’t understand that blk_reign. Why do people call Howard “the mecca” when clearly the AUC (Atlanta University Center) is the Mecca of black intellectual power and prestige: Morehouse College (Ranked #1 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row)  , Morehouse Theological Seminary, Morehouse Medical School, Spelman College (Ranked #2 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row. #1 for black women obviously) , Clark Atlanta University,  and Morris Brown College. I mean come on now. When we have homecoming in the AUC we do it real big. Perhaps Howard is a mecca...but, it's not the mecca. F*ck HOWARD!

BLSD- Check out some 2004 Morehouse Homecoming Pics:
http://vipphotos.net/gallery/homecoming10302004
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

jdohno

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #26 on: July 10, 2005, 11:35:13 AM »
I know. I was trying to find something that proved that Spelman was the top HBCU.  ;) I thought Howard was ranked higher though because of the recent success they are having. Denzel's son is at Morehouse, right? On the football team?

http://www.blackenterprise.com/ExclusivesEKOpen.asp?id=880

I think that HBC was going by the rankings of Black Enterprise Magazine


blk_reign

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #27 on: July 10, 2005, 11:42:21 AM »
yes he is

Edit: Johnnetta B Cole really brought Spelman College to where it is today.. I am pretty sure that Bennett College will rise in their endeavors and accomplishments within the next few yrs.

I know. I was trying to find something that proved that Spelman was the top HBCU.  ;) I thought Howard was ranked higher though because of the recent success they are having. Denzel's son is at Morehouse, right? On the football team?

http://www.blackenterprise.com/ExclusivesEKOpen.asp?id=880

I think that HBC was going by the rankings of Black Enterprise Magazine

We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

jdohno

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #28 on: July 10, 2005, 11:55:05 AM »
I hope so. Bennett College is always forgotten. But Spelman deserves their spotlight.

yes he is

Edit: Johnnetta B Cole really brought Spelman College to where it is today.. I am pretty sure that Bennett College will rise in their endeavors and accomplishments within the next few yrs.

I know. I was trying to find something that proved that Spelman was the top HBCU.  ;) I thought Howard was ranked higher though because of the recent success they are having. Denzel's son is at Morehouse, right? On the football team?

http://www.blackenterprise.com/ExclusivesEKOpen.asp?id=880

I think that HBC was going by the rankings of Black Enterprise Magazine


HBCU.EDU

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Re: Howard's homecoming
« Reply #29 on: July 10, 2005, 01:32:45 PM »
Bla bla bla! >:( You and Sands are alike in that you have to post long ass articles to make a point. @#!* U.S. NEWS!! Black Enterprise surveyed 1,855 African American higher education professionals with titles such as president, chancellor, and provost, for their assessments of the social and educational environments of the nation's colleges and universities for African American students. They said Morehouse is #1 and my sister school Spelman is #2!! End of story. With everything they have going on in that article you posted Howard is still ranked #4 in this b*tch! Morehouse is the first HBCU to produce a rhode scholar and we have more of them than Howard.  Besides, Dr. Martin Luther King is a Morehouse Man! Howard can’t beat that. Like I said...Howard is a Mecca...but, it's not THE Mecca. Obviously that title belongs to the AUC with Morehouse and Spelman leading the way. Besides, the first black president of Howard University was a Morehouse Man. So, that school is what is today because of "Da House". We made a foundation for that school.    



:D


Howard University: Mecca of Black education

IT is the richest Black educational institution in America, and one of the country's top research schools. Armed with a $312 million general endowment and a successful recruiting strategy that has attracted students who can hold their own with counterparts at prestigious White institutions, Howard University is experiencing one of the most successful periods in its 136-year history.



One of 48 private universities (the only African-American university) supported mostly by funds from the U.S. Congress, the school now ranks as the 131st richest school (tops among Black institutions).

Howard has awarded more than 95,000 degrees. In fact, Howard produces more African-American Ph.D.s and MDs than any other university in the world. And with more than 3,000 faculty members, it has the largest concentration of African-American scholars in the world.

This year, Howard has 10,500 students enrolled in 12 schools and colleges, which include arts and sciences, business, communications, medicine, dentistry, divinity, pharmacy, nursing and allied health, social work, graduate school, education, engineering, architecture and computer sciences, and law.

For administrators, faculty, students and alumni, the national and international recognition being bestowed on their school only confirms what they have known all along: Howard produces graduates who not only have a high sense of cultural awareness and pride, but who are ready for cutting-edge careers in competitive areas of expertise.

Leading this push to higher ground is the university's president H. Patrick Swygert. For Swygert, who left his president post at the State University of New York (Albany) in 1995 to come to Howard, his mission is two-fold: Never forget Howard's steep history, but also never get so caught up in it that he doesn't adequately prepare the school for the ever-changing future. "I feel a tremendous sense of responsibility to those who come before me, and an even greater responsibility to those who come after me," he says. "One challenge is to continue to convince our community that if you attend Howard University or an HBCU, your child has a full opportunity to be successful, both in terms of human growth and potential, and professional growth and potential in this society."

Swygert points to such notable Howard alumni as Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, Emmy Award-winning actress Phylicia Rashad, singer Jessye Norman, actress-producer Debbie Allen, Dr. LaSalle Leffall, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, L. Douglas Wilder, and former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young.

Wayman Smith, chairman emeritus of the Board of Trustees, says he's very pleased with Howard's progress. "The school is on a track where it is competing with some of the top schools in the country," he says. "We are in a competitive environment. Howard has always been the pinnacle, the capstone of education in the African-American community. What has not been quite as self-evident is how well Howard University is competing against all other universities. When our students graduate, they can compete with anybody who graduated from any other school. We must continue that growth."

Award-winning actor, activist and Howard alumnus Ossie Davis says the school is an "outstanding university. It's a first-class university, one of the premiere educational institutions in the country," he says. "Howard is one of those bastions that define us, articulate our point of view, defend our interest."

In addition to educating its students, Howard has always had roots in civic-minded activism. That continues today with highly public stands taken recently by students on such issues as affirmative action and the crisis at historic Morris Brown College. "We are committed to the agenda of the African-American community nationally and worldwide," Swygert says. "For us, it's not simply about our doing well. But it's doing well with a purpose. It's a very old vision, but one that I want to build upon. It's not just about bricks and mortar. It's about purpose. I'd like to think that it's a live vision. It's not a static one."

The Howard vision began in November 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War when a group of ministers and abolitionists, Black and White, persuaded Congress to address the needs and aspirations of the freedmen. The institution was named for General Oliver O. Howard, the commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. The first class of four students graduated in 1870. The first Black president was the legendary Mordecai Johnson, who was inaugurated in 1926.

It wasn't until 1928 that Congress authorized an annual federal appropriation to Howard for construction, development, improvement and maintenance. Today, 35 percent of Howard's annual budget comes from the Federal Government, which still leaves a great need for additional funds. In recent years, President Swygert has instituted several cost-cutting measures at the university and initiated a $250 million campaign. President Swygert says that although "Howard is a national university chartered by the U.S. Congress," federal support "does not meet all our needs as the only HCBU designated in the highest research category. We must call upon our alumni and friends for the additional resources needed to finance scholarships, fellowships and endowed chairs for our students and faculty."

University officials say African-Americans are increasingly responsive to their appeals. At the last Charter Day Celebration, 10 African-Americans gave $1 million apiece. Eight, including Chairman Frank Savage and President Swygert, were alumni.


"I have been a big admirer of Howard ever since I attended the first NAACP meeting in Baltimore when Thurgood Marshall was named assistant counsel," Johnson says. "I knew that he was a Howard graduate, and I have been so inspired by the marks that he and so many other alumni have made on this nation. I am honored to make a contribution that will help to continue the great journalism tradition to which I have dedicated my life."

Jannette Dates, the dean of the School of Communications, says Johnson's gift will permit the school to move forward at a much faster pace than expected. "We are so excited to be able to break ground," she says. "We've worked about four years on curriculum, and deciding what we wanted in the new building. We want students to be prepared," she continued, "to be competitive when they get out of here."

Another area of study Howard takes pride in is its School of Business. One of the first accredited business schools in Washington, D.C., it trains students to go out and make a place for themselves in the world of business. In addition to strenuous academic courses, the school hosts executives from more than 200 companies each year.

Many Fortune 500 companies, such as General Electric, J.C. Penney, Goldman Sachs and Chase Manhattan, have adopted the business school, agreeing to hire interns and recruit graduates. A dozen or so companies also give the business school $100,000 each year. Striving to be one of the best business schools in the country, the school only admits about 100 students each year. "We have the cream of the crop," says School of Business Dean Barton Harvey. "We want to be known for being tough and innovative."





I don’t understand that blk_reign. Why do people call Howard “the mecca” when clearly the AUC (Atlanta University Center) is the Mecca of black intellectual power and prestige: Morehouse College (Ranked #1 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row)  , Morehouse Theological Seminary, Morehouse Medical School, Spelman College (Ranked #2 HBCU for 2 yrs in a row. #1 for black women obviously) , Clark Atlanta University,  and Morris Brown College. I mean come on now. When we have homecoming in the AUC we do it real big. Perhaps Howard is a mecca...but, it's not the mecca. F*ck HOWARD!

BLSD- Check out some 2004 Morehouse Homecoming Pics:
http://vipphotos.net/gallery/homecoming10302004