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Author Topic: LSAT blues  (Read 915 times)

eggo125

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LSAT blues
« on: July 07, 2005, 07:53:48 PM »
Hi,

I took the June LSAT and expected to score within the high 150s to low-mid 160s range, the range I had consistently been scoring in for the past 1/2 yr. taking practice tests. However, on the actual exam I scored a 151!!!! I was so depressed ever since I got my score that I contemplated giving up going to law school altogether. My goal is to get into a T2, there's no chance in hell I will get into a T1 with a 151 on my record. I graduated from U.C. Berkeley with an UGPA of 3.2. What type of schools can I get into with my current numbers, and what would I need to score on the October LSAT to be able to achieve my goal of getting into a T2??

I have a pretty good work and extra-curricular activities background, and have some pretty good LOR from my professors from college and from the attorneys at the law firm that I work for now as a corporate paralegal (a top tier firm). I am definitely going to take the LSAT again in Oct. and at this point I am not even nervous anymore, I am just pissed off. I think I stressed myself out too much the day of the exam, the June LSAT was not as difficult as I thought it would be, but still I scored a 151!! I'M PISSED!

I want to go to law school, I know I have what it takes to be a lawyer, all the attorneys that I work with here (mostly ivy-league graduates) encourage me to go to law school and tell me I'd make a great lawyer someday. But all that encouragement means *&^% if I don't have the numbers to get into a good school.

What should I do??? And can anyone give any tips on how I should be studying for the LSAT over the summer? I am planning to start again next week. I took a TM course, did the whole PS Logic Games and Logical Reasoning Bibles, AND did 20 practice tests. Am I just plain STUPID or is the LSAT just the most difficult test ever!?!

Any advice or tips would be greatly appreciated!!!

Thanks!




NowBadger

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2005, 08:59:27 PM »
I can relate - I did worse my first time than expected, but improved significantly the second time.

I firmly believe that the pressure is off the second time, and your score will improve.  Plus if you get more than 10 points higher the second time some schools disregard your first score.

Here's what worked for me:

I took a long break - did not even look at anything LSAT for months (I was actually hoping not to retake, and applied to schools anyhow - I'm actually still on the waitlist). 

The second time I didn't really stress out about studying.  I took a "cold" practice test, and discovered  that my score hardly declined despite my months off (and was higher than my actual LSAT score).  Therefore, I was able to study "smater."  I focused much less on timing (since I had that "down" after all my practice from the first time), and focused on mastering every question.  I worked mostly on LR, since it is the bulk of the test. 

When I did time myself I limited it to 30 minute sections.  I knew that if I could get a good score at 30 minutes, I could do it on test day.

Good Luck.

ScaredyCat

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2005, 12:26:30 AM »
I would be upset as heck too!  I'm getting scared even more to take that dreadful test for the first time. 

Silvermtn

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2005, 01:04:47 AM »
eggo 125,

I'm in the same boat as you but at least take comfort in this: we got the same amount of questions right that in tests past would have gotten us a 154.  Apparently Law Services thought that the logic games were way too easy this time and they seriously downcurved the scoring scale so, its not you.

Dunkelzimmer

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2005, 01:38:09 AM »
Hi there,

 
    I'm not so sure if my story could help to boost your confidence, but here is my two-cents. 
    I took the Oct. '03 test and got a 147.  I knew I would get that score, but decided that sheer will would get me through.  It didn't.  I prepped a lot more one year later.  I enjoyed the TestMaster's course in Berkeley, and when I knew I wasn't ready for the Oct. '04 test, I took the course one more time and sat for the Dec. '04 test instead.  Similar to you, I knew that the LSAT would be the biggest challenge out of my whole package for applications.  Anyway, if I could pin point the one single thing that I did that helped me on the second test, it would be my focus on training hard on the LRs.
 My formula was basically,
   1) doing the LRs on your own, timed;
   2) going over both sections of a practice exam with a friend,
   3) debate with eachother outloud why a certain answer is correct, and then
   4) check which was indeed correct and figure out why you got the incorrect ones wrong.  It was pretty fun at times, because I'd stick to an answer with all my might and get it wrong.  This revealed some of the mechanisms built into the LSAT, and showed how thinking traditionally (i.e. without the structure the LSAT demands of you) could lead you to cogent arguments in real life but poor LSAT scores.
   This helped me A LOT.  But at times I would sit for 6-7 hours at a bookstore debating with my friend, so its being time consuming was a female dog.
    Yes I focused on the LRs the most, since it was short enough for a good debate, and it also takes up half of the test.
    I was also advised to study hard enough that by the time you have to take the test, your mentality is "if i do well, great.  But if I don't, I have had enough of the LSAT."  This worked for me.  By test date, I felt the LSAT was second nature to me.
    By the way, I got a 162 on the second test.  The jump worked in my favor, gave me an edge others didn't really have.  Because it proved the fact that I was good at over coming certain natural obstacles, e.g. a terrible standardized test taker.  I know that might sound pedantic and quite a cliche for a not-so-original theme on the personal statement, but at the end of the day, all I wanted was to get into a good school.  I managed to snatch a Tier 1, I was pretty stoked. 
    If you have been scoring consistenly between the high 150s and low 160s on the diags, you will far surpass what I did.         
    Study hard and have confidence in yourself.
    Good luck to you.
Going from a Slug... to an Aggie.  Davis '08

"MAN PROPOSES, AND GOD DISPOSES." -TOLSTOY

treene079

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2005, 01:20:48 PM »
Don't give up hope.  You might just need a new strategy when taking the LSAT.  I took a timed, practice LSAT at home and received a 160.  I just took my first proctored diagnostic with TestMasters and earned the glorious score of 150!!!  My biggest problem was time.  The music outside, people tapping pencils, and the instructor calling time left every 5 to 10  minutes was a huge distraction to me, and I was only finishing about 2/3 of each section. 

Besides taking the TM course in Berkeley (I'm also a UCB grad), I'm also going to take practice tests in different environments (quite places, noisy cafes, and places inbetween) to help develop my concentration skills.  I didn't realize how distracted I get. 

Maybe you just need to figure out what are the big differences between your practice tests and the real thing.  Were you just too nervous?  Were there distracting noises?  Did you rush too much trying to finish each section that you lost out on accuracy?  Did you just go to slow?  etc

Kaplan in San Francisco offers free proctored practice LSATs, so you can work on your strategy there.  Good luck to you! 

~Treene~     

John Galt

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2005, 04:31:32 PM »
Hi,

I took the June LSAT and expected to score within the high 150s to low-mid 160s range, the range I had consistently been scoring in for the past 1/2 yr. taking practice tests. However, on the actual exam I scored a 151!!!! I was so depressed ever since I got my score that I contemplated giving up going to law school altogether. My goal is to get into a T2, there's no chance in hell I will get into a T1 with a 151 on my record. I graduated from U.C. Berkeley with an UGPA of 3.2. What type of schools can I get into with my current numbers, and what would I need to score on the October LSAT to be able to achieve my goal of getting into a T2??

I have a pretty good work and extra-curricular activities background, and have some pretty good LOR from my professors from college and from the attorneys at the law firm that I work for now as a corporate paralegal (a top tier firm). I am definitely going to take the LSAT again in Oct. and at this point I am not even nervous anymore, I am just pissed off. I think I stressed myself out too much the day of the exam, the June LSAT was not as difficult as I thought it would be, but still I scored a 151!! I'M PISSED!

I want to go to law school, I know I have what it takes to be a lawyer, all the attorneys that I work with here (mostly ivy-league graduates) encourage me to go to law school and tell me I'd make a great lawyer someday. But all that encouragement means sh*t if I don't have the numbers to get into a good school.

What should I do??? And can anyone give any tips on how I should be studying for the LSAT over the summer? I am planning to start again next week. I took a TM course, did the whole PS Logic Games and Logical Reasoning Bibles, AND did 20 practice tests. Am I just plain STUPID or is the LSAT just the most difficult test ever!?!

Any advice or tips would be greatly appreciated!!!

Thanks!





Yo, keep some perspective. Some of the top lawyers in the country went to very low ranked law schools. If you're determined then you'll be an awesome attorney someday. It won't be as easy, but life isn't easy anyways. Your LSAT score and GPA will get you into a couple of decent schools. Work your ass off and create opportunities for yourself.

Usually in the 155 range I recommend a retake...but considering you're at 151, I'd stay pat. If you somehow went any lower, you're going to keep yourself out of law school period.

eggo125

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2005, 06:52:55 PM »
Thanks for all of your replies, it definetly makes me feel a lot better to know that they are other people out there who feel me on my situation. I am going to start studying for the October LSAT  and will be sure to take into account some of the studying strategies posted that I did not use before.

One more question though, is it really true that if I score 10 points higher than my first score some laws schools disregard my first score??

Thanks again!!!!  :)


brucepearl

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2005, 10:29:41 PM »
June 05 LSAT: 159 (brutal)
Last 4 after 167, 159, 166, 161
October LSAT: TBD
GPA:3.79

gailrules

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Re: LSAT blues
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2005, 04:50:26 PM »
I think you should consider taking a few years off and getting some real-world experience. It's only going to help you. If you want to go because you love the material (and not the potential pay-check), you will get in somewhere. If you work full time for a few years and then apply to LS, you are perceived as someone who REALLY knows that it's what they want to do because you are giving up a career and a lot of potential $$$.

And if you end up in the 3rd tier, so what? You might not have the best-paying job prospects, but if you're good at what you do, you'll move up the ladder in good time.