Applying to law school > Law School Applications

admissions consulting question?

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dave:
I am a undergrad that will be applying to law school in the fall. My G.P.A and LSAT scores are in the bottom 25-30% for the schools that I am going to apply to. I picked up a book by Richard Montauk called "How to get into the top law schools", and he also has an admission consulting firm that helps you write essays and gives you direction on your personal statement and the admissions process in general. The thing is, is that he is very expensive. I was wondering if anybody has used his consultation before, and what kind of experience you had with it. Any info or advice would be appreciated. Thanks. Dave.

MichUGrad:
Even if you get in, will you be happy at such a high-pressure school?

mish:
Hi,

I don't think you really need to pay for someone to review your application when there are so many free resources available.  For example, professors (esp. English), learning center and career services at your school, friends, co-workers, your boss, etc.  Remember, you want to be marketable but you also want to be yourself.  If you send an application that doesn't really represent who you are, you might end up in a school that doesn't really fit.  Admissions committees while they are reviewing your application stats, like grades and LSAT scores, they are also looking to see if you are a right fit for their school.  You wouldn't want to be stuck in a place where you couldn't relate to anyone, therefore, my advice is pay for an LSAT prep class, but not for reviewing your application.  If you must however, use it as a last resort.  The LSAT prep course is much more important b/c a good score can not only get you accepted but merit scholarships as well.  Hope this helps, and goodluck!

;)

mish:
Hi,

I don't think you really need to pay for someone to review your application when there are so many free resources available.  For example, professors (esp. English), learning center and career services at your school, friends, co-workers, your boss, etc.  Remember, you want to be marketable but you also want to be yourself.  If you send an application that doesn't really represent who you are, you might end up in a school that doesn't really fit.  Admissions committees while they are reviewing your application stats, like grades and LSAT scores, they are also looking to see if you are a right fit for their school.  You wouldn't want to be stuck in a place where you couldn't relate to anyone, therefore, my advice is pay for an LSAT prep class, but not for reviewing your application.  If you must however, use it as a last resort.  The LSAT prep course is much more important b/c a good score can not only get you accepted but merit scholarships as well.  Hope this helps, and goodluck!

;)

mish:
Hi,

I don't think you really need to pay for someone to review your application when there are so many free resources available.  For example, professors (esp. English), learning center and career services at your school, friends, co-workers, your boss, etc.  Remember, you want to be marketable but you also want to be yourself.  If you send an application that doesn't really represent who you are, you might end up in a school that doesn't really fit.  Admissions committees while they are reviewing your application stats, like grades and LSAT scores, they are also looking to see if you are a right fit for their school.  You wouldn't want to be stuck in a place where you couldn't relate to anyone, therefore, my advice is pay for an LSAT prep class, but not for reviewing your application.  If you must however, use it as a last resort.  The LSAT prep course is much more important b/c a good score can not only get you accepted but merit scholarships as well.  Hope this helps, and goodluck!

;)

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