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Author Topic: admissions consulting question?  (Read 2439 times)

dave

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admissions consulting question?
« on: March 27, 2002, 03:08:22 PM »
I am a undergrad that will be applying to law school in the fall. My G.P.A and LSAT scores are in the bottom 25-30% for the schools that I am going to apply to. I picked up a book by Richard Montauk called "How to get into the top law schools", and he also has an admission consulting firm that helps you write essays and gives you direction on your personal statement and the admissions process in general. The thing is, is that he is very expensive. I was wondering if anybody has used his consultation before, and what kind of experience you had with it. Any info or advice would be appreciated. Thanks. Dave.

MichUGrad

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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2002, 02:22:24 PM »
Even if you get in, will you be happy at such a high-pressure school?

mish

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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2002, 05:33:37 AM »
Hi,

I don't think you really need to pay for someone to review your application when there are so many free resources available.  For example, professors (esp. English), learning center and career services at your school, friends, co-workers, your boss, etc.  Remember, you want to be marketable but you also want to be yourself.  If you send an application that doesn't really represent who you are, you might end up in a school that doesn't really fit.  Admissions committees while they are reviewing your application stats, like grades and LSAT scores, they are also looking to see if you are a right fit for their school.  You wouldn't want to be stuck in a place where you couldn't relate to anyone, therefore, my advice is pay for an LSAT prep class, but not for reviewing your application.  If you must however, use it as a last resort.  The LSAT prep course is much more important b/c a good score can not only get you accepted but merit scholarships as well.  Hope this helps, and goodluck!

;)

mish

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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2002, 05:34:32 AM »
Hi,

I don't think you really need to pay for someone to review your application when there are so many free resources available.  For example, professors (esp. English), learning center and career services at your school, friends, co-workers, your boss, etc.  Remember, you want to be marketable but you also want to be yourself.  If you send an application that doesn't really represent who you are, you might end up in a school that doesn't really fit.  Admissions committees while they are reviewing your application stats, like grades and LSAT scores, they are also looking to see if you are a right fit for their school.  You wouldn't want to be stuck in a place where you couldn't relate to anyone, therefore, my advice is pay for an LSAT prep class, but not for reviewing your application.  If you must however, use it as a last resort.  The LSAT prep course is much more important b/c a good score can not only get you accepted but merit scholarships as well.  Hope this helps, and goodluck!

;)

mish

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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2002, 05:36:46 AM »
Hi,

I don't think you really need to pay for someone to review your application when there are so many free resources available.  For example, professors (esp. English), learning center and career services at your school, friends, co-workers, your boss, etc.  Remember, you want to be marketable but you also want to be yourself.  If you send an application that doesn't really represent who you are, you might end up in a school that doesn't really fit.  Admissions committees while they are reviewing your application stats, like grades and LSAT scores, they are also looking to see if you are a right fit for their school.  You wouldn't want to be stuck in a place where you couldn't relate to anyone, therefore, my advice is pay for an LSAT prep class, but not for reviewing your application.  If you must however, use it as a last resort.  The LSAT prep course is much more important b/c a good score can not only get you accepted but merit scholarships as well.  Hope this helps, and goodluck!

;)

mish

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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2002, 05:40:42 AM »
Hi,

I don't think you really need to pay for someone to review your application when there are so many free resources available.  For example, professors (esp. English), learning center and career services at your school, friends, co-workers, your boss, etc.  Remember, you want to be marketable but you also want to be yourself.  If you send an application that doesn't really represent who you are, you might end up in a school that doesn't really fit.  Admissions committees while they are reviewing your application stats, like grades and LSAT scores, they are also looking to see if you are a right fit for their school.  You wouldn't want to be stuck in a place where you couldn't relate to anyone, therefore, my advice is pay for an LSAT prep class, but not for reviewing your application.  If you must however, use it as a last resort.  The LSAT prep course is much more important b/c a good score can not only get you accepted but merit scholarships as well.  Hope this helps, and goodluck!

;)

Thomas

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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2002, 10:42:22 AM »
I posted this on another thread, and here it goes again...

Have you checked out the website EssayEdge.com?  You can look through their many successful application essays for free.  If you decide to use their editing service, you'll need to pay a fee though.  But with the 10% discount coupon code ("1018119302"), the price is actually quite reasonable, plus their editing expertise is top-notch.  

Also I found this customers poll on their site:

1. Were you a college, professional school, or graduate school applicant?
33% college applicants, 43% professional school applicants, 19% graduate school applicants, 5% other applicants

2. On a scale of 1 - 10, how much did your editor improve your essay? Select "10" for "tremendous improvement"; select "1" for "absolutely no improvement."
9.1

3. To what extent will you incorporate EssayEdge edits into the final version of your essay. Select "10" for "accept every edit"; select "1" for "reject every edit."
8.7

4. Were you satisfied with EssayEdge?
99+ percent "YES"

5. Did you find the critique helpful?
93 percent "YES"

6. On a letter grade scale of F to A+, please rate the overall quality or EssayEdge editing?
A

7. Did you get into one of the top three schools on your initial list? Did you get into the top school?
At least one of top three: 94 percent yes. Top school: 66 percent yes

8. Do you think EssayEdge editing improved your chances of admission?
96 percent yes

9. Would you recommend EssayEdge to a friend?
98 percent yes

 

Cyrus

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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2003, 12:21:25 PM »
Nice plug for your website! I mean, the customer survey really hit the spot.


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Re: admissions consulting question?
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2003, 12:21:40 PM »
I have also looked into that book by Dr. Montauk...
Good advice bad deal
What I mean is the book is exemplary but don't go with consulting firm, or essayedge (though I would lean more towards EssayEdge than the firm) just get some professional editing by a proffesor of your graduating institution save your money for LSAT prep and more importantky app fees.
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