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Author Topic: Two little questions about the LSAT....  (Read 1348 times)

LambdaLadyAce1975

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Two little questions about the LSAT....
« on: June 10, 2004, 10:42:14 PM »
Hi. In three years I will be in the same spot as those of you who took or will be taking the LSATs this year. I wanted to know which resource, whether it'd be Kaplan, an official LSAT book, or anything else, has helped you out the most with the LSAT? Also, what advice would you give to future LSAT test takers? Thanks and good luck ;D.
Places I'm looking into*:

Potentials: NYU, Columbia, UVA, Hofstra, St. John's

Maybes: GWU, GU

*Subject to change once I finally take the
LSAT and once I complete my research

University of Maryland at College Park
Economics '07
French Studies '07

Gummo

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Re: Two little questions about the LSAT....
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2004, 10:57:39 PM »
Hi. In three years I will be in the same spot as those of you who took or will be taking the LSATs this year. I wanted to know which resource, whether it'd be Kaplan, an official LSAT book, or anything else, has helped you out the most with the LSAT? Also, what advice would you give to future LSAT test takers? Thanks and good luck ;D.


Forget about it for the next two years?  Real LSAC Prep Tests are the absolute best resource...for future reference.  And Powerscore's Logic Games Bible, unless there's something better two years from now.

Sen

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Re: Two little questions about the LSAT....
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2004, 11:30:26 PM »
I suggest that you don't start studying until about 9 months before the exam. There are only a limited amount of pertinant study material, and you don't want to exhaust it before the test. Also, in 2 years, they might even add a scored writing section and who knows what.

But hang around the forums and pickup bits and pieces- so far what I've heard is that the Powerscore and Testmasters prep classes are alot better than Kaplan and PR. My personal opinions is that you should invest the money in the LSAC preptests and other publications instead of dropping a cool G on a prepcourse- cause they're gonna just sit you down and teach you what you can learn on your own or with a group of people. But who knows, I might crack down and take a weekend course if I need it near the end.
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Deposit @ UNC
Waitlisted @ BU, WUSL, Fordham, Gtown
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M2

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Re: Two little questions about the LSAT....
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2004, 11:36:16 PM »
My only advice to you at this point is to make sure that you have enough money to do whatever you need in order to sufficently prep yourself...
This could range from $300-$1500 depending if you prep yourself or take a course. Also, dont even think about starting till maybe 6 or 7 months before the test.

cnkis

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Re: Two little questions about the LSAT....
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2004, 10:01:32 PM »
I agree that the preptests are the best resource and the Logic Games Bible. I took the Kaplan course and I don't think that it really helped me that much with reading comp. So I think if you got a prep book with tips for the logical reasoning along with the LG bible, you should do just as well as those who take a class. Save the money and go to Hawaii or Europe  ;) In case you don't know since you won't be preping for a while, you get the prep tests from either the bookstore (10more LSATs) or at www.lsac.org. Good Luck  ;D
Dec LSAT here I come :)

superiorlobe

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Re: Two little questions about the LSAT....
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2004, 09:57:22 AM »
I would start studying about 18 months before the LSAT, unless you really want to cram.  The single most important thing you can do, however, is to subscribe to the Economist and read it cover to cover every week.