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Author Topic: Kaplan  (Read 820 times)

JBBroadShot

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2005, 02:30:40 PM »
I don't know how there can be any comparison between Kaplan/Princeton and TM/PS.  For one, Kaplan and Princeton make up all of their questions, so that practice score you get isn't off a real scaled LSAT (and the national scale is all that matters), you don't practice on real questions, and the teachers don't have to have done exceedingly well on the test, in contrast to TM/PS.  I took testmasters, raised my score a helluva lot.  You get every real LSAT Q in existence, 99th percentile teachers, tons of hours of class instruction, the list goes on.  If you're going to take a prep course (which I HIGHLY recommend), it has to be TM or PS, don't waste your money on the others.
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jenery

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2005, 03:15:47 PM »
Kaplan actually only uses questions from previous LSATs -- they don't make up their own questions.  I don't necessarily recommend them, but wanted to clarify that.

theo

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2005, 03:16:12 PM »
I don't know how there can be any comparison between Kaplan/Princeton and TM/PS.  For one, Kaplan and Princeton make up all of their questions, so that practice score you get isn't off a real scaled LSAT (and the national scale is all that matters), you don't practice on real questions, and the teachers don't have to have done exceedingly well on the test, in contrast to TM/PS.  I took testmasters, raised my score a helluva lot.  You get every real LSAT Q in existence, 99th percentile teachers, tons of hours of class instruction, the list goes on.  If you're going to take a prep course (which I HIGHLY recommend), it has to be TM or PS, don't waste your money on the others.


I am in complete agreement with the above, although I will note that as of a few months ago, Kaplan, under pressure from the far superior Testmasters180.com and Powerscore courses, has begun providing students of their full course with all available previously-administered real Preptests:

http://www.kaptest.com/repository/templates/ArticleInitDroplet.jhtml?_relPath=/repository/content/Law/Our_Programs/LSAT_Prep/LS_lsat_class.html

When I took Kaplan, you had to go into their offices to see real preptests, which were laughably encased in plastic sleeves to prevent you from writing on the pages.

But note this wording from the course description:

"All of our take home material features only real LSAT questions, giving you the confidence of knowing you are practicing with questions once given as part of a real LSAT." 

I think it is safe to infer that the in-class materials still consist mostly or entirely of bogus Kaplan-written questions.

None of this changes the fact that Kaplan's instructors are much less-qualified (90th percentile vs. 99th percentile) and much lower-paid than TM or PS instructors, and that the Kaplan methods are designed to get your average dullard up past the magic 155 score barrier.  It is possible to find a 99th percentile instructor teaching your class at Kaplan, but the odds are strongly against it.  To say nothing of the huge class-hour deficit compared to TM and PS.

If you hope to break into the upper realms, you will do so only in spite of, not because of, Kaplan's assembly-line techniques.

Is it necessary to add that TM and PS cost the same or less than Kaplan?

If TM or PS is available where you are, or even if there's a hefty commute, it's a no-brainer.

O.P., you didn't say where you are- there are also some excellent regional courses that would be much better than Kaplan or Princeton.
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bobwil50

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2005, 03:41:29 PM »
I really have no idea, but if I were going to spend $1000+ on LSAT instruction, I would get a testmasters private tutor for 20 hrs at $1600.  I would guess that one hour of personalized instruction is worth at least four hours of classroom instruction.  But again, I really have no idea.
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theo

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2005, 03:53:32 PM »
I really have no idea, but if I were going to spend $1000+ on LSAT instruction, I would get a testmasters private tutor for 20 hrs at $1600.  I would guess that one hour of personalized instruction is worth at least four hours of classroom instruction.  But again, I really have no idea.


If you are going to step up a notch in expense, a good tutor is an excellent way to go, but at those rates, they are expensive if you are getting your hand held through the basics. 

If you go with a tutor, the thing to do is read LRB and LGB, and then go to the tutor for fine tuning.
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mark_ede

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2005, 04:57:35 PM »
Kaplan is certainly not the best. Nonetheless all its material is from actual preptests (I took the classroom course in May). They also did provide students with every released preptest, among other things. The only fake questions may be in their online workshops, which were kind of silly.

theo

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2005, 05:31:25 PM »
Kaplan is certainly not the best. Nonetheless all its material is from actual preptests (I took the classroom course in May). They also did provide students with every released preptest, among other things. The only fake questions may be in their online workshops, which were kind of silly.

I'll take your word for it.
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lawstudent3

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2005, 05:32:59 PM »
Kaplan is certainly not the best. Nonetheless all its material is from actual preptests (I took the classroom course in May). They also did provide students with every released preptest, among other things. The only fake questions may be in their online workshops, which were kind of silly.

I'll take your word for it.

FWIW, I took the course in January, and their materials were as follows:

In-class book:  all real LSAT questions
3 take-home books:  2 were fake, and one had all real

We did not receive all the tests, but rather, had to use the plastic-coated ones like you spoke of.  Perhaps that's changed now, but that's the way it was 6 mo. ago.

theo

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2005, 05:45:33 PM »
If the in-class material was real previously, that would explain the wording from the course description page.

"All of our take home material features only real LSAT questions, giving you the confidence of knowing you are practicing with questions once given as part of a real LSAT." 
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mark_ede

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Re: Kaplan
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2005, 06:16:13 PM »
Yeah the whole center deal is silly. They still have those laminated tests, but since they provide you with a book of all 45 preptests, and since you can download full answer keys to any given preptests, there's no need to take a proctored test with them.

The problem was that the classes were the instructors reads from the text.