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Author Topic: women in law  (Read 4431 times)

evas

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women in law
« on: June 09, 2004, 11:03:02 AM »
Hey guys,

I am applying to law school next year after retaking the LSAT in October (150 for my 1st time).  My concern is about my future as a lawyer.  I will have to take out 100-120k in loans to finance my education.  Then, when I come out I will work full time for a year and then start a family.  At that time, I plan on working part time until my kids are in school.  That means that I will not be makin serious money (100k) that will pay back my loans until my mid-thirties.  If I do not go to law school, I will start working in marketing/advertising in two years without any loans, and will start making money. 

My concern is whether lawyers can work part time and how much can they make?  Also, if I work part time for 5-7 years, can I then return full time with enough credibility as a good lawyer?  If anyone has been in this situation or gone through it, please share your experience.  By the way, my husband is going to be a doctor, so when he finishes medical school I will need to focus on our family more because of his hectic schedule. 

Any advice is much appreciated...Thanks!

jacy85

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Re: women in law
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2004, 11:31:22 AM »
At what point is your husband in the process of becoming a doctor?  I have many friends in med school right now, and apparently going through your residency is a time when many many med students default on loans.  You're not officially a student, but you're not in any position to be making any money with the peanuts you earn.

If you're planning on starting a family, and if your husband has anywhere near the amount of debt my friends in med school have, I would almost advice against going to law school.

However, if despite the debt, this is something you want to do, there are firms that allow you to work part time.  My firm is a major national/international firm, and we have a policy that allows people to do that for whatever reasons, on the condition that you will still be able to meet the needs of your collegues and be of service to the firm.  Most people that take advantage of this cite family concerns.  However, a big issue in your case would be the fact that you'll be working for only a year before do this.  I don't know exactly what my firm's policy is in terms of "earning" the option to do this, or if everyone can.  I do know, however, that at many larger firms, the first few years you're there you're putting in lots and lots of hours, so going part time with a big firm (ie where most people make their big money), may not make you an attractive hire.  I have no experience with smaller firms though, so someone else may be able to advise more.

Good luck with the lsat when you take it, and with what ever decision you make for you and your husband (and future family!)

ebrumm

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Re: women in law
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2004, 12:01:06 PM »
This is def somthing Ive thought about also.

My sister-in-law got married to my bro and had kids within like 4 years of graduating law school. She was able to continue working from home (on a contract basis that equaled close to part time) for the entire time and continues to do so now (my nephews are 3 & 5). I think she'll go back fulltime in 2 years (when the 3 yearold is in school). Its doable - she was lucky and was hired at a good lawfirm that liked her enough to adjust to her needs.

I dont know exactly what she or my bro earn, but they recently bought a house and go on vacations and all - so they are able to make it happen... sorry I dont have more details on that.

Munkeysgrrl

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Re: women in law
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2004, 12:12:30 PM »
Sorry, but if you only want to work 1 year and then stop why bother?  If you really LOVE the law and have experience already working in the field and know this for sure, then maybe.  But with the debt and all, it seems like a risk.  You might change your mind after having a family, and then what?  Plus, one year out doesn't give you the experience you need, and doesn't demonstrate responsibility and committment.  Firms are not going to be quick to hire you if you practiced for one year, quit for 3 and came back with little experience.  And if they do for part-time, you won't make enough to pay back your loans.  Children are very expensive and time consuming.  Having two parents that are never home, and who are in demanding, and at at times stressful jobs might not be the best thing.  Perhaps you can consider the marketing avenue further.  I am still considering whether I want to take out the loans, and I do not plan on having children.  $1000 payments for the next 15 years scares the heck out of me.  Good Luck!! 
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schoomp

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Re: women in law
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2004, 12:13:18 PM »
The most disturbing thing about this thread - why the hell do you have to give everything up to raise the children while your husband becomes a doctor?  Maybe you should see about working out your schedules so that both of you can have jobs and take care of the kids.  Maybe he should think about giving up his career so that you can do what you want to do.  Why do you have to give up your want to become a lawyer just for him???

jgomez

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Re: women in law
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2004, 12:16:55 PM »
traditionalism.

The most disturbing thing about this thread - why the hell do you have to give everything up to raise the children while your husband becomes a doctor?  Maybe you should see about working out your schedules so that both of you can have jobs and take care of the kids.  Maybe he should think about giving up his career so that you can do what you want to do.  Why do you have to give up your want to become a lawyer just for him???

jgruber

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Re: women in law
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2004, 12:19:45 PM »
That's personal choice.  I gave up similar things early in my marriage.

The most disturbing thing about this thread - why the hell do you have to give everything up to raise the children while your husband becomes a doctor?  Maybe you should see about working out your schedules so that both of you can have jobs and take care of the kids.  Maybe he should think about giving up his career so that you can do what you want to do.  Why do you have to give up your want to become a lawyer just for him???

evas

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Re: women in law
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2004, 12:30:14 PM »
I do plan on working full time later in life to establish a career as a lawyer

jacy85

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Re: women in law
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2004, 12:56:08 PM »
Have you considered doing the marketing thing for a while and saving up money, and in about 5 or 6 years, when you say you'd like to have kids, you can go to ls in a part time program, be home during the day for the kids, your husband will be nearing completion/finished with his residency, and after the 4 years, you'll be done with ls, your first child will be ready to start preschool, and you can then start looking for jobs.  With the money you've saved in teh 5 or 6 years of working, you'll have less in debt because you'll have more cash to go towards law school.  You'll have days free for your children. 

It seems like a more flexible option for what your goals are.  So you may want to toss the idea around.

dsong02

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Re: women in law
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2004, 12:58:01 PM »
i dont think law school is really worth it if youre planning on working part-time for the first 5-6 years. 

i have never heard of a part time lawyer...

it might be better to work now instead and save money...then later on go to law school and pursue what you want.
'why does it hurt so much when i poke it?'