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Tobias Beecher

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i knew a girl in high school, blonde hair and blue eyed....

and she told me her grandmother is filipino.......





Stroopwafel

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Stroopwafel,
First, wow! That is one of the best short answer explanations of Filipinos in America I have ever read. You lay out perfectly why it’s virtually impossible for anyone to mark anything as a sole race. Especially in the case of the Philippine Islands, who were raped and pillaged by the many waves of europeons and others. There is no pure blood for sure.

What I wanted to accomplish here was not to gain an advantage with AA. Anyone who has attended a UC knows that the Asian ethnic group has more than filled our quota. It concerns me though because it seems so hypocritical to welcome diversity, but then to define diversity solely as what can be seen on the skin. If anything the varying skin color of Filipino’s is a testament to our struggle and diversity. I have had so many people just message me and say “just mark white”. I don’t think I am do this, and feel honest about it. My heritage colors so many of aspects of my personal life. From political opinions on slavery, colonialism, globalization, women’s rights, and the suffering of the poor, to Food preferences like midnight cravings for pancit or adobo. Don’t get me wrong, I hate nationalism in all it’s form, I think it’s a pox on human progress, but that is not what heritage is for me. I am proud of my great-grandfather, and grandfather, and I feel like just marking “white” would be dismissing where they came from, and how I was able to be here. Thanks for all the advise guys. I think I will file a “diversity addendum”. Do you think I should specifically state in it, along with the above discussion, that I do not expect to gain any advantage for AA, or should I just explain why I mark Filipino, and leave it at that?


Camus,

I wouldn't mention that that you are not seeking admission based on AA. The individual schools that you apply to will decide that based on the class that they are putting together. Some schools will ding you for marking Asian, some school look for it to broaden the class. It is in every law student's best interest to have as diverse a class in school as possible, if only to be better able to serve after graduation.

But do explain the discrepancy between your appearance, and why you marked Filipino on your application.  If you can, if the application allows it, mark OTHER and then write in Filipino. It would draw attention to your diversity statement. I would even add that because of your background, you will be able to serve in a bridging cultures role that will be ever increasing in a legal world that is more, and more focused on globalization, internationalization, and interdependecy. 

Asian-American groups that have historically done well in placing people for law school are basically those of Chinese and Japanese ancestry. Filipinos, Laotians, Hmong, Vietnamese, Thais, Indians, Pakistanis, Koreans, Malays,and Indonesians tend not to have huge representative numbers in law schools. As these cultures have an increasing say in America, and as each generation goes from being "immigrants" to "native born" then you will see the numbers increase.

Remember that the European immigrants have had a different immigration history. When the Italians and Irish (for example) first arrived in the early 20th Cent. they were also discriminated against. But with time they have become part of the fabirc of American society. Granted, their fortuitous skin color has helped them assimilate more quickly, their immigrant stories are now part of American legend. This will also happen with Asian ethnic groups. So long as the established descendents of those earlier immigration waves are able to adjust, adapt, and allow newer immigration to write their own American legends.

Hey Clone, I'm not surprised. I dated a Filipino girl who had freckles, and her mom had natural red hair thanks to her German ancestry.  I have relatives whose ancestry is Basque - Filipino and they are also physically European looking. My aunt in Madrid looks completely Iberian. My dad used to be confused for Chinese, or Japanese. My mom looks Latin, and since she speaks Spanish, people assume that she is Mexican. My younger brothers either look Mexican, Spanish, or Samoan. I get confused for Mexican, First Nations, and when I played rugby a Pacific Islander (Tongan or small Samoan...very flattering for a rugby player!  ;D). W
Rest not. Life is sweeping by; go and dare before you die. Something mighty and sublime, leave behind to conquer time.

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J D

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Stroopwafel,

Great posts.  I was here (as a lurker) during the whole "l'affaire de BigTex."  (WARNING!  Rant to follow!)  Let me just say, "Geez, that was stupid (on the part of the AdCom)!"  I can't believe that it's the frelling twenty-first century and we still have (allegedly) smart, well-educated professionals who assume that one's ethnic identity is synonymous with one's physical countenance.  You'd think that anthropology had not advanced at all in 100+ years (when it basically served as an intellectual justification for racial animus)!  Such assumptions are especially bogus in the case of Hispanics.  Hispanics cannot all be lumped into one category based on physical appearance.  They may be Asian, black, indígeno, mestizo, zambo/pardo, and yes, even white.  The admissions person who thought that Tex's "whiteness" (in conjunction with his Hispanic self-identification) was even an issue should have been sacked for gross ignorance and insensitivity.  Ethnicity is a matter of pure self-identification anyway; no one should have to go through the hassle of "proving" one's heritage to a complete stranger who's apparently too ill-informed to realize that one's skin color doesn't necessarily tell you anything about where that person came (and is coming) from. 

Ok, rant over now.  ;)

Good luck in the application process, Camus.  I hope it all goes well, and I think it will.  It sounds like you already have one hell of a strong personal statement to work on (unlike me, the boring twenty-something white guy; I had plenty of interesting stories to tell, but none of them were about ME!  *Sigh* Oh well, I can't really complain).  You take care as well, Stroopwafel.

Cheers.
"I never think of the future.  It comes soon enough."--Albert Einstein

J D

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Stroopwafel,

I understand and agree with everything you have said so far.  By "boring," I simply mean that I really don't think I have done anything that interesting or exciting with my life to date, I don't usually get out all that much.  Usually I am stuck at home poring over some monographs for class.  As I said, there are lots of interesting stories in my family (e.g. my grandfather came here from Italy in 1934, fleeing fascist brown-shirted thugs, with only a fifth-grade education, and put five kids through college woring as a landscaper, etc.); it's just that none of them are about me (at least not yet).  I have read about lots of places and peoples, and living in Miami has given me the opportunity to learn much about other cultures (Cuban, Venezuelan, Colombian, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, etc.).  But I haven't traveled really at all (the only foreign country I've been to is Canada, and even then only to Ontario), and I don't really think I can really call myself educated until I travel and see how other people in other places live and deal with all the various aspects of the human condition.  Until I do that, I'm not sure that my reading, or my interaction with all the wonderful people I've met here, means all that much; it still means something, it is still important.  But I also recognize that it isn't everything; I still have quite a ways to go.

Take care.

JD, dude there is no such thing as a "boring twenty-something white guy" in America in this century. You have open access to the sweetest fruit from thousands of cultures that have all come here to call her home. You can travel around the world without even leaving your neighborhood, if you are blessed with diversity. When you can see thousands of hot chicks of all races, and cultures, then you realize that beauty is universal.

Skin is total BS. We as a society cannot move forward until we give up these colonial thoughts. We put too much emphasis on the importance of race and skin. It is sad really.

You have to abandon certain aspects of your self in order to gain so much more. I have a friend that is of Scottish ancestry. He is really proud of his heritage. Wears a kilt, and a skein dubh to the bars and the lot. He also has cornrows...red freaking cornrows. He is also a rabid hip-hop fan. Lots of his friends are black, Mexican, Filipino, and white. He has respect for the music, for hip-hop culture, and by extension can empathize with the plight of the inner-city. He has Wu-Tang lyrics memorized. He has lost the preconcieved notions of what a white dude in America should look like, dress like, and who his social circle should be. But he has gained a community that could really care less what his skin color is. And even though he is a total freak and a party menace, he is also a really cool dude.

If skin is the all important impermiable packaging then you will never get through it. But if you see it as only the container then you get access to the amazing stories, legends, pride, folly, sadness, and soul of another culture.

I have to think this way. There is no other way. Respect other cultures and races. Make their stories your stories, their culture your culture, their sadness yours, and as a result their greatness becomes your as well. Make an attempt people, you can only grow from it.

"I never think of the future.  It comes soon enough."--Albert Einstein

camus

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« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2005, 11:25:57 PM »
a

J D

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I feel you regarding the not-having-money thing; this last year has been especially rough for my family, financially speaking.  *sigh* "And this, too, shall pass."  As far as the PS, thanks for the sugestions, but it's a little late for me; I'll be starting BU in the Fall.  Thus I can't really complain; I think I wrote an adequate PS that addressed my interests, my family background, what living in Miami is like, etc.  Nothing spectacular, but adequate.  Why is it that whenever one opens those "Real Law School Essays That Worked" books, you either get really bad essays, or ones that begin with, "I leanred a lot while working at that leper colony during that summer in Swasiland . . .

I wish I had more time to read philosophy in college.  Unfortunately, I was already too preoccupied with trying to figure out whether Oliver Cromwell was being portrayed as Christ-figure during his funeral ceremony (History Major, could you tell?).  But I have often enjoyed classes that incorporated a lot of Philosophy and theory (except for that class on the Enlightenment, because the professor was a real jerk).  Except for Kant.  But, oh well, you can't have everything.  ;)
"I never think of the future.  It comes soon enough."--Albert Einstein