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Author Topic: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?  (Read 1079 times)

UMHBmom

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2005, 08:11:48 PM »
DO NOT GO TO BAYLOR!!! 

UT, SMU, and UH law schools teach you how to think like a lawyer.  Baylor Law is, essentially, a THREE-YEAR BAR PREP COURSE.  Baylor Law does not focus on teaching you think like a lawyer; instead, it focuses on teaching you TEXAS BLACK LETTER LAW.  This is not an advantage, even if you want to practice in Texas.  This can be proven by the fact that many Texas law firms choose SMU and UH grads over Baylor grads ALL OF THE TIME. 

Although you mentioned you wanted to practice in Texas, Baylor does not dominate any Texas town.  In the Austin area, UT Law dominates, as it does throughout Texas.  In the DFW area, SMU Law dominates.  And, in Houston, UHLC and South Texas dominate.  Surprising?  South Texas has a GREAT reputation in Houston; a better rep. than Baylor. 

BOTTOM LINE: Tulane will teach you to think like a lawyer and will give you the same opportunities, as Baylor will, to practice in Texas.  CHOOSE TULANE.


It's clear that this poster has no idea what law school is all about. For one thing, the notion that one can pass the Bar and not "think like a lawyer" is ridiculous. At no level of law education is it sufficient to memorize "the rules" by rote and then spit them back out again. If you are to "think like a lawyer", you must know those rules like the back of your hand,AND you must be able to fit the rules to the facts. When this poster criticizes the teaching of "black letter law", the poster exposes a common ignorance: that there are two separate laws, one on some higher, theoretical plane, and one written in the books. Perhaps if this poster looked in the books, he would be astounded to find that the books do not contain THE LAW. The books contain the cases that espouse the theories of the law! Yes, there is codified law based on state and federal statutes, but as far as "the game" of law is played, it's all about the theory, baby, and who can make the most creative use of it. There is no such thing as a "theoretical" school and a "black letter" school. There is no such thing as a school that prepares you for the Bar yet somehow fails to prepare you as a lawyer. I don't mean to be unkind, but I am a very tired Baylor student and simply wish to suggest to the poster that he/she/it might want to avoid Baylor like the plague because it appears to me that perhaps the poster's only true complaint is that it was the toughest. Wah.

Facts:

Baylor has the second-highest number of firms that do on campus interviews in the state, second only to UT. UT is the largest law school, Baylor is the smallest.

If it appears that there are more lawyers from all of the other schools, you would be correct. We're the smallest. Fewer graduates. So the fact that firms hire more UT, UH, and SMU grads is a no-brainer. There's more of them out there! It's just elementary math.

Baylor has the greatest number of interview requests from firms outside of the state of Texas... and this includes UT. Surprise!

And a PS about Tulane: It's a good school, but there's one major, major, major problem: Louisiana is the ONLY state in the entire US to work under the Napoleonic Code. This is NOT a bad thing, but it does mean that you will have to do some serious Bar review in another state if you want to work outside of Louisiana. The theoretical differences are relatively minor, but the procedural differences (and you might think that's no big deal until you take classes in procedure!) are HUGE. Here's info: http://www.la-legal.com/history_louisiana_law.htm. Ironically, because it's civilian law, LA is the only state in the union that uses nothing but... you guessed it... BLACK LETTER LAW. :) You'll learn the common law way, too, simply because the federal system in the state is uniform with the rest of the country.
Good luck choosing!

Bahamut

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2005, 11:46:46 PM »
DO NOT GO TO BAYLOR!!! 

UT, SMU, and UH law schools teach you how to think like a lawyer.  Baylor Law is, essentially, a THREE-YEAR BAR PREP COURSE.  Baylor Law does not focus on teaching you think like a lawyer; instead, it focuses on teaching you TEXAS BLACK LETTER LAW.  This is not an advantage, even if you want to practice in Texas.  This can be proven by the fact that many Texas law firms choose SMU and UH grads over Baylor grads ALL OF THE TIME. 

Although you mentioned you wanted to practice in Texas, Baylor does not dominate any Texas town.  In the Austin area, UT Law dominates, as it does throughout Texas.  In the DFW area, SMU Law dominates.  And, in Houston, UHLC and South Texas dominate.  Surprising?  South Texas has a GREAT reputation in Houston; a better rep. than Baylor. 

BOTTOM LINE: Tulane will teach you to think like a lawyer and will give you the same opportunities, as Baylor will, to practice in Texas.  CHOOSE TULANE.


That was quite possibly the most ignorant post I've ever read on this site...and I've seen many. You obviously have no idea what you're talking about, so never talk. Ever.
SMU Fall '05

Austin_Anderson

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2005, 07:03:59 AM »
UMHB hit the nail on the head, with the exception of her critique on Tulane.  Tulane does not teach civil law as a required course.  it is an elective and thus the law education you get there is essentially the same as the education that you get at any other law school.  i think Tulane's location bodes well for those interested in comparative law; I don't see it as a negative in any way, shape, or form. 


midjeep

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2005, 12:36:17 PM »
I don't know anything about Tulane, but I don't know what it is w/ everyone's recent negative attitude toward Baylor on this board.  I chose Baylor over UT.  I think it's a better school.  Yeah, it's hard and yeah they teach you the black letter law.  What a novel idea, learning the law you'll be practicing.  Personally, I don't want to sit around and theorize about what I think about this theory or that or whatever.  I want to be prepared for a job and that's why I chose Baylor.  Waco's not so bad either.  And, by the way, I think either would get you a good job in Texas too.  I have friends at UT and Baylor and all my Baylor friends had clerkships after 1L, not all my UT friends did.  Don't know if it's just my friends or what, but I thought it was interesting...

Ellie,
The same amount of negativity occurred at this time last year too. I think it's from people who got rejected from Baylor and they get all pissy about it. Since Baylor is also Baptist, it gets even more negativity here especially since the majority on here consider themselves as liberal. You should have seen the backlash last year re BYU. It was non-stop Mormon/BYU bashing for over a month. Honestly, its suprisingly calmer this year.
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UMHBmom

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2005, 03:11:24 PM »
UMHB hit the nail on the head, with the exception of her critique on Tulane.  Tulane does not teach civil law as a required course.  it is an elective and thus the law education you get there is essentially the same as the education that you get at any other law school.  i think Tulane's location bodes well for those interested in comparative law; I don't see it as a negative in any way, shape, or form. 



Whoops, my fault. I thought that Tulane by its very location would teach civilian law. I never meant to imply that that was a negative, simply a difference to consider. I stand corrected.

ElizaB

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2005, 07:46:00 PM »
I don't know how Tulane v Baylor fairs in Texas...I think Baylor might fair slightly better.  However, on a national level, Tulane has a better reputation than Baylor.  Plus, if you are not interested in going into litigation, Tulane will provide you with more opportunities to explore other arenas of law.  At Baylor you are pretty much stuck taking all of the litigation classes.
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Austin_Anderson

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2005, 03:45:19 AM »
ElizaB,

just curious, how many Baylor Law grads do you know?  I know several (including father and friends) and I don't know anyone who was "stuck" taking litigation cases.  If you want to do litigation then that door is certainly open; however, other doors are not closed merely because of Baylor's reputation in litigation. 

Please note that I chose not to attend Baylor Law and I'm not defending some school that I will be attending merely because of my future there.  Truth of the matter is a degree from Baylor Law is respected throughout Texas, AND your chances of passing the bar are higher if you attend Baylor than anywhere else.  That being said, I do feel that your chances of being employed outside Texas are better if you attend Tulane law (but this is pure speculation). 

ElizaB

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Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2005, 08:46:07 AM »
Austin_Anderson:

I in no way implied that any doors would be closed in other arenas of law just because the OP decided to attend Baylor.  You greatly exagerated my original post.  However, I maintain that the OP will have the opportunity to take classes and "explore" more arenas of law at Tulane.

And while I do infact know several Baylor Law Grads, it does not really matter because I'm not going by what they said. (And the curriculum your Dad went through at Baylor 20 or more years ago probably isn't the same curriculum they currently have in place.) At any rate, I'm going by what the Baylor curriculum says and what I learned at their student's day and what was said by the students that are currently attending there and what is even written in their published promotional materials and on their website. 

Baylor does not give you the number of electives that other schools do...Anyone who goes to Baylor has to take certain required courses (call them "litigation" courses, call them whatever you want...but they are aimed at litigation) that other schools don't require. This is why the Admins at Baylor love to say that their grads are more "prepared" to enter the courtroom. And this leaves less room for other electives.  I heard this information (not verbatum, but very close) out of the mouth of one of Baylor's admission's people at their student's day.  This is why Baylor's 2nd and 3rd year is supposed to be so much more rigorous than the 2nd and 3rd years at other law schools.

I'm not saying that the OP will have 0 electives, but I am saying that their are quite a few more required course at Baylor and that he will have less electives at Baylor than at Tulane.

Here is a link to the required courses at Baylor.  If you scroll down you will see a link to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd year required courses:

http://law.baylor.edu/faculty_curriculum/faculty_curriculum.htm

Now compare this to Tulane:

"The second and third years of law school at Tulane are fully elective, with the exception of the required legal ethics hours (if not taken during the first year) and the required community service work. Upperclass students may choose from a wide spectrum of courses and seminars. They are free to develop areas of concentration within the curriculum, for example, in admiralty, taxation, or international and comparative law, if they so desire. Certificates of specialization are offered in European Legal Studies, Environmental Law, Sports Law, and Maritime Law. A new certificate in Civil Law was awarded for the first time in 2001. Students may receive only one certificate at graduation."

http://www.law.tulane.edu/prog/index.cfm?d=curriculum&main=upperclass.htm

And if you want to do further research you will find that Tulane also offers more joint degree program and more clinics than Baylor...or at least more clinics in a broader area.

I'm not in any way putting down Baylor for this or building up Tulane...I'm just stating the facts the way I see them in an attempt to give the OP more knowledge in making his/her decision.
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