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Author Topic: OneNote Program Question  (Read 975 times)

ct_rdr

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OneNote Program Question
« on: May 27, 2005, 10:19:33 PM »
I've been looking into OneNote for notetaking and I really like the feature that allows you to record the elcture so it can be played back if you miss something. I'm not too savvy about computer accessories, so could you guys give me some ideas about what kinds of timy microphones would work with my Dell laptop and this program? Thanks!

jomolungma

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2005, 09:41:20 AM »
sony offers a couple of good ones designed for large lecture halls... i forget the models, but if you go to their website www.sonystyle.com you'll see them.  not sure of other brands.  also, if you go to amazon.com and search on microphones you'll see several with user comments atteched.

tacojohn

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2005, 09:45:14 AM »
Just about any microphone will work, since it will just plug into either the microphone port or a USB port.

I plan to use OneNote for outlining/notetaking, but one caveat: it prints weird.  Specifically, what will be one which page is not as easy to see.  So plan to spend a little while during the reading period before exams putting everything into a better word processor, and creating an outline that is more useable for exams.

blake840

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2005, 11:55:55 PM »
I downloaded OneNote, and it seems like it could be very useful, but I can't figure out how to use it.  Can someone tell me some of the basics?


Sorry to be a pain
Uconn Law 1L.

tacojohn

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2005, 08:43:47 AM »
Basically, it's a word processor without all the word processing restrictions that word has.  You should have a formatting toolbar that looks almost exactly like Word's.  You can type anywhere on the page.  Anywhere you type, a text container is automatically formed.  You can drag those around the page, and if you drag them over another one, they merge together.  When you mouse over a paragraph, a little box with four arrows shows up next to the paragraph (or bullet point or outline section).  Grab that and you can tear off that piece of text and move it anywhere on the page or in the section you're writing.

Another big OneNote feature is note flags. There should be a button with a pull-down menu in the main toolbar (I think it looks like a checkbox with a checkmark by default.  Whatever section of text the cursor is or is highlighted will have the note flag you select be applied to it.  There are a number of default ones, like "Important", "To-do", "Remember for Later", "Question", etc.  There is also the Note Flag Summary pane, where you can see all your note flags.  I have mine already set up for law school with flags that correspond to the briefing technique in Law School Confidential.

The file organization of OneNote is supposed to reflect a 3-ring binder.  You have the whole notebook, which has folders, which have sections, which have pages, which can have subpages.  My advice for setting up the notebook is to make a folder called "Classes" and make a section for each class.  I would use one page for each topic in the class, say in Contracts, one page for offer, one for acceptance, one for consideration.  Then a subpage for each day we talk about the topics, so I can see quickly and easily what was covered on each day.  OneNote also saves everything automatically, so you don't have to manually go File->Save.

Everything in OneNote is searchable as well.  That should come in handy when it's 8:00 and a prof askes you about Jones v. Smith and you can just type in the case name and go right to your notes.

There's a lot more (very powerful program), but my advice to you is to just play around with it over the summer.  OneNote is difficult to learn at first because it looks like a word processor but doesn't act like one.  It's also hard to really see the benefit of it until you have a large amount of information in it.  If you work at an office job with meetings and reserch of any kind, use OneNote so you can get the hang of it.

Microsoft's OneNote page is also a great resource, lots of tips, tutorials, page templates, videos, etc.  I'd look over as much as you can.

jomolungma

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2005, 10:04:06 AM »
I downloaded OneNote, and it seems like it could be very useful, but I can't figure out how to use it.  Can someone tell me some of the basics?


Sorry to be a pain
There are tutorials available on Microsoft's website that are useful in getting you started.  After that, there are discussion boards and knowledge bases on the Microsoft website that can also help.

BAFF213

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2005, 10:35:04 AM »
tag

billiardballs1701

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2005, 12:41:53 PM »
Basically, it's a word processor without all the word processing restrictions that word has.  You should have a formatting toolbar that looks almost exactly like Word's.  You can type anywhere on the page.  Anywhere you type, a text container is automatically formed.  You can drag those around the page, and if you drag them over another one, they merge together.  When you mouse over a paragraph, a little box with four arrows shows up next to the paragraph (or bullet point or outline section).  Grab that and you can tear off that piece of text and move it anywhere on the page or in the section you're writing.

Another big OneNote feature is note flags. There should be a button with a pull-down menu in the main toolbar (I think it looks like a checkbox with a checkmark by default.  Whatever section of text the cursor is or is highlighted will have the note flag you select be applied to it.  There are a number of default ones, like "Important", "To-do", "Remember for Later", "Question", etc.  There is also the Note Flag Summary pane, where you can see all your note flags.  I have mine already set up for law school with flags that correspond to the briefing technique in Law School Confidential.

The file organization of OneNote is supposed to reflect a 3-ring binder.  You have the whole notebook, which has folders, which have sections, which have pages, which can have subpages.  My advice for setting up the notebook is to make a folder called "Classes" and make a section for each class.  I would use one page for each topic in the class, say in Contracts, one page for offer, one for acceptance, one for consideration.  Then a subpage for each day we talk about the topics, so I can see quickly and easily what was covered on each day.  OneNote also saves everything automatically, so you don't have to manually go File->Save.

Everything in OneNote is searchable as well.  That should come in handy when it's 8:00 and a prof askes you about Jones v. Smith and you can just type in the case name and go right to your notes.

There's a lot more (very powerful program), but my advice to you is to just play around with it over the summer.  OneNote is difficult to learn at first because it looks like a word processor but doesn't act like one.  It's also hard to really see the benefit of it until you have a large amount of information in it.  If you work at an office job with meetings and reserch of any kind, use OneNote so you can get the hang of it.

Microsoft's OneNote page is also a great resource, lots of tips, tutorials, page templates, videos, etc.  I'd look over as much as you can.

Great info - i certainly agree with you on learning it over the summer before heading off to school - It is a BAD IDEA to learn a new program right before or God forbid during the first week of classes.

tacojohn

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2005, 04:04:04 PM »
Another program to consider is Agilix GoBinder.  It has a greater ability to bring in information that has already been created.  I tried it but didn't like how you had to type outlines.  I think it might be a slightly better product for tablets, but OneNote is probably better for laptops and typing.

ct_rdr

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Re: OneNote Program Question
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2005, 10:42:33 AM »
So, then, getting back to the topi ;) I can get any little microphone plug in and it will work? As is, they are universal?