Law School Discussion

LSAT Accomodations?

Ivy_Hopeful

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LSAT Accomodations?
« on: May 18, 2005, 09:37:53 AM »
I was just wondering what the consensus was and pros and cons (I know most of the pros I believe) are for having a degenerative eye disorder that complicates and compromises your ability for taking the LSAT. I am having an appointment with my neural opthamologist in late June (unfortunately past the June LSAT) and will be evaluated for the seriousness and validity for more time on the LSAT. My question for any of you who know (with the exception of what the LSDAS/LSAC registration/information book states) what happens and how much of a disadvantage will my score be at if I asked for more time based on my eye disorder. BTW this is a legitimate problem that I was born with so please no snyde remarks. The disorder is Hershberg Congenital E.T. complicatd by Strabismus and heightened retinal pigmentosa (since the disorder tacks on disorders over time until I have no sight the original was Hershberg a very rare eyey disorder)
In other words I am blind in my left eye (20/250ish) or 6% vision if you want specifics and this affects my visual field and visual scanning (I am doing more research to present to my physicican later).

Other proof of my claim is that based on what LSAT instructors (several) have told me is that the difference in untimed (or double time) tests should not differ greaatly from timed proctored tests (they will differ but rarely more than 20 percentile points) My current untimed (double timed) LSAT is just over 90th percentille whereas my last highest proctored test (after about 14) is in the 47th percentile).
So what do you think?

Darrell Duncan

PS the rest of my application is very strong including being in the top 5%+ of my graduating class, member of many organizations, honor scoieties, worked in a law firm, published a novel (in press), variety of philantropies, the list goes on and my LOR's are GREAT!.  I will be applying for the next cycle and take the LSAT w or w/o accommodations in October.

 

Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2005, 01:17:18 PM »
It's also accommodate.  A good way to remember this is that accommodate has to accommodate two c's and two m's.

ccorsi

Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2005, 01:51:54 PM »
Is spelling like an 8th grader a disability?  If so, I should have also applied for special accommodations.

Is being stupid also a reason for special accommodations?

C2

Ivy_Hopeful

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Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2005, 02:04:14 PM »
Is spelling like an 8th grader a disability? If so, I should have also applied for special accommodations.

Is being stupid also a reason for special accommodations?

C2

What are you getting at. Seriously, no and no. Learning disabilities are legit and in my case I was born completely blind, after one eye was fixed (almost) the other didn't take and due to this problem (I have proposed) my standardized test scores reflect my theory about the visual scanning for my one good eye (or lack thereof) when I am given more time to "scan" the words my score skyrockets and I as of recently scored in the mid 90th percentile range versus scoring as low as 20th (or lower I can't remember) percentile timed.

In other words I was scoring as low as mid 130's timed and as high as 165 with more time...

Darrell

Shira

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Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2005, 02:15:16 PM »
If you have to ask then you have to ask yourself why you are asking. Basically, if you need the accommodations, get them. If not, don't put yourself at an unfair advantage by getting extra time, and don't put yourself at an unfair disadvantage by getting extra time.

If you need extra time, you need it.

I took the LSAT with accommodations but without extra time. Yes, they gave me total cr*p accommodations and as a result I ran out of time on the games section with twelve answers guessed in a row. This wasn't because they didn't give me extra time; it's because the accommodations they provided were absolute sh*t. If you need accommodations *aside* from extra time, make damned sure you know what you're getting, because they are *ssholes about it and won't have time to talk to you a week before the exam or even the day of.

Bit jaded here.

But in short... don't take the extra time unless you need it, but if you need it, take it and don't fret about the pros and cons -- it's not like you have a choice.


I was just wondering what the consensus was and pros and cons (I know most of the pros I believe) are for having a degenerative eye disorder that complicates and compromises your ability for taking the LSAT. I am having an appointment with my neural opthamologist in late June (unfortunately past the June LSAT) and will be evaluated for the seriousness and validity for more time on the LSAT. My question for any of you who know (with the exception of what the LSDAS/LSAC registration/information book states) what happens and how much of a disadvantage will my score be at if I asked for more time based on my eye disorder. BTW this is a legitimate problem that I was born with so please no snyde remarks. The disorder is Hershberg Congenital E.T. complicatd by Strabismus and heightened retinal pigmentosa (since the disorder tacks on disorders over time until I have no sight the original was Hershberg a very rare eyey disorder)
In other words I am blind in my left eye (20/250ish) or 6% vision if you want specifics and this affects my visual field and visual scanning (I am doing more research to present to my physicican later).

Other proof of my claim is that based on what LSAT instructors (several) have told me is that the difference in untimed (or double time) tests should not differ greaatly from timed proctored tests (they will differ but rarely more than 20 percentile points) My current untimed (double timed) LSAT is just over 90th percentille whereas my last highest proctored test (after about 14) is in the 47th percentile).
So what do you think?

Darrell Duncan

PS the rest of my application is very strong including being in the top 5%+ of my graduating class, member of many organizations, honor scoieties, worked in a law firm, published a novel (in press), variety of philantropies, the list goes on and my LOR's are GREAT!.  I will be applying for the next cycle and take the LSAT w or w/o accommodations in October.

 

Ivy_Hopeful

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Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2005, 02:20:43 PM »
Thank you again for responding Shira, I guess I am only seeking assurance for what it is I am going to do...

Darrell

XYZZY

Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2005, 02:26:04 PM »
i happen to do a lot of signal processing for radar and sonar applications, and have full understanding what the difference between 2 sensors (eyes) and 1 can make.  my guess is since you were born with this condition, you don't have a before and after to gauge the differences, but im guessing it affects your reading speed and accuracy which is one of the assumptions the lsat is based on.  Just out of curiosity, how many WPM can you read accurately?

I would seek the accommodations if I were you. 

Ivy_Hopeful

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Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2005, 02:30:27 PM »
XYZZY,

I can read fairly fast (400-600 WPM) but I can not calculate the words from my eyes to my brain as fast which makes the actual accurately statement drop to about 230 WPM or less, but since there is no test (like eyey-Q for reading WPM) that measures eye scanning-comprehension and rescan ability only seperate then the 230 is just a guess.

Ivy_Hopeful

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Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2005, 02:38:37 PM »
XYZZY,
I have sought out a variety of individuals that are experts in certain areas and have asked for their advice and knowledge (neural ophthalmologists, optometrists, radiologists, psychologists of various fields [perceptual, cognitive psyc, developmental] since that was/is my major. etc...)  I have researched and will continue to research the problem of visual scanning when one only has less than 1 eye (90%) versus 2 together. The reason why I am asking about everyone's opinion here is because I was born with it this kind of "seeing" is all I know, and with exceptions of "must be in front of class" I have never asked for special accommodations before and I have turned out fine (top 5% of graduating class of 4,000 etc...).

Darrell

XYZZY

Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2005, 02:39:39 PM »
i was guessing it would be under 300, less than the average adult.  binocular vision enables the reading 'bit' to consist of phrases, where one eye subconcsiously scans ahead while the other eye does the conscious reading (peripheral vision is also relevant).  So in essense, a normal person would only need 2 to 3 mechanical movements of the eye to read a line (also electronic scanning is involved)  With one vision the 'bit' is defined as a single word which requires more mechanical scans to read a line.  Additionally the brain has to remember more bits of information before it can form a meaningful phrase.... ie: 'press' is not very meaningful but 'press on accelerator' is.. you get the picture.