Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: LSAT Accomodations?  (Read 2063 times)

Ivy_Hopeful

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 537
  • Final UGPA 3.894 / LSAT 141
    • MSN Messenger - dduncan81@msn.com
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Dduncan81
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - Derryp999
    • View Profile
    • A website that I built and maintain.
LSAT Accomodations?
« on: May 18, 2005, 11:37:53 AM »
I was just wondering what the consensus was and pros and cons (I know most of the pros I believe) are for having a degenerative eye disorder that complicates and compromises your ability for taking the LSAT. I am having an appointment with my neural opthamologist in late June (unfortunately past the June LSAT) and will be evaluated for the seriousness and validity for more time on the LSAT. My question for any of you who know (with the exception of what the LSDAS/LSAC registration/information book states) what happens and how much of a disadvantage will my score be at if I asked for more time based on my eye disorder. BTW this is a legitimate problem that I was born with so please no snyde remarks. The disorder is Hershberg Congenital E.T. complicatd by Strabismus and heightened retinal pigmentosa (since the disorder tacks on disorders over time until I have no sight the original was Hershberg a very rare eyey disorder)
In other words I am blind in my left eye (20/250ish) or 6% vision if you want specifics and this affects my visual field and visual scanning (I am doing more research to present to my physicican later).

Other proof of my claim is that based on what LSAT instructors (several) have told me is that the difference in untimed (or double time) tests should not differ greaatly from timed proctored tests (they will differ but rarely more than 20 percentile points) My current untimed (double timed) LSAT is just over 90th percentille whereas my last highest proctored test (after about 14) is in the 47th percentile).
So what do you think?

Darrell Duncan

PS the rest of my application is very strong including being in the top 5%+ of my graduating class, member of many organizations, honor scoieties, worked in a law firm, published a novel (in press), variety of philantropies, the list goes on and my LOR's are GREAT!.  I will be applying for the next cycle and take the LSAT w or w/o accommodations in October.

 
Winners: Cooley w/$, UDM
Losers: MSU, DePaul, NYLS, UI, Georegtown, WSU, PSU, Kent, Cleavland State, ASU
In Limbo + Purgatory: N/A

Law School Numbers.com

LSD Debut UGPA 3.651 Final UGPA 3.894 / LSAT October 1st, 2005: 141

theo

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1834
    • View Profile
    • Fine surname
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2005, 01:29:32 PM »
it's strabismus.
quid leges sine moribus vanae proficiunt?

Ivy_Hopeful

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 537
  • Final UGPA 3.894 / LSAT 141
    • MSN Messenger - dduncan81@msn.com
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Dduncan81
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - Derryp999
    • View Profile
    • A website that I built and maintain.
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2005, 02:34:30 PM »
-Thanks theo but I was in a hurry and didn't have time to spell check and the importance of the spelling is rather irrelevant, it is the consequences that stem for it that I ultimately concerned with.

-Others... Bump.
Winners: Cooley w/$, UDM
Losers: MSU, DePaul, NYLS, UI, Georegtown, WSU, PSU, Kent, Cleavland State, ASU
In Limbo + Purgatory: N/A

Law School Numbers.com

LSD Debut UGPA 3.651 Final UGPA 3.894 / LSAT October 1st, 2005: 141

irishtap

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 84
    • View Profile
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2005, 03:17:18 PM »
It's also accommodate.  A good way to remember this is that accommodate has to accommodate two c's and two m's.

theo

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1834
    • View Profile
    • Fine surname
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2005, 03:41:08 PM »
From U. Michigan Law School's FAQ:

http://www.law.umich.edu/prospectivestudents/Admissions/faq.htm

<<<<<<
I have a learning disability that I believe would allow me to receive extra time on the LSAT. Should I apply for accommodation? Will my file be evaluated differently if I have an accommodated test score?
If you think you may be entitled to accommodation on the LSAT, you should certainly apply to the Law School Admissions Council; forms are available on the LSACís Web site.

You should apply for accommodation irrespective of whether the accommodation you seek is extra time for a learning disability or some adaptation for a physical disabilityĖbut it is the former circumstance that tends to cause applicants concern that accommodation will reflect negatively on them in the application process. Please be assured that this certainly will not be the case at Michigan Law. We treat all LSAT scores, whether accommodated or not, in the same way: as one element, albeit an important one, of many factors in a complicated assessment process. If you are entitled to accommodation and do not utilize it, it is likely that your score will be negatively affected; while we would take into account any information you provide about why the score may not be predictive for you, you would nonetheless be better off simply to have a more favorable score in the first instance. For a detailed FAQ on the subject of accommodated testing, visit the LSACís Web site.
>>>>>
quid leges sine moribus vanae proficiunt?

ccorsi

  • Guest
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2005, 03:51:54 PM »
Is spelling like an 8th grader a disability?  If so, I should have also applied for special accommodations.

Is being stupid also a reason for special accommodations?

C2

theo

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1834
    • View Profile
    • Fine surname
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2005, 03:53:55 PM »
It's also accommodate.  A good way to remember this is that accommodate has to accommodate two c's and two m's.


Just think "commode".
quid leges sine moribus vanae proficiunt?

Ivy_Hopeful

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 537
  • Final UGPA 3.894 / LSAT 141
    • MSN Messenger - dduncan81@msn.com
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Dduncan81
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - Derryp999
    • View Profile
    • A website that I built and maintain.
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2005, 04:04:14 PM »
Is spelling like an 8th grader a disability? If so, I should have also applied for special accommodations.

Is being stupid also a reason for special accommodations?

C2

What are you getting at. Seriously, no and no. Learning disabilities are legit and in my case I was born completely blind, after one eye was fixed (almost) the other didn't take and due to this problem (I have proposed) my standardized test scores reflect my theory about the visual scanning for my one good eye (or lack thereof) when I am given more time to "scan" the words my score skyrockets and I as of recently scored in the mid 90th percentile range versus scoring as low as 20th (or lower I can't remember) percentile timed.

In other words I was scoring as low as mid 130's timed and as high as 165 with more time...

Darrell
Winners: Cooley w/$, UDM
Losers: MSU, DePaul, NYLS, UI, Georegtown, WSU, PSU, Kent, Cleavland State, ASU
In Limbo + Purgatory: N/A

Law School Numbers.com

LSD Debut UGPA 3.651 Final UGPA 3.894 / LSAT October 1st, 2005: 141

theo

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1834
    • View Profile
    • Fine surname
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2005, 04:07:06 PM »
Is spelling like an 8th grader a disability? If so, I should have also applied for special accommodations.

Is being stupid also a reason for special accommodations?

C2

What are you getting at. Seriously, no and no. Learning disabilities are legit and in my case I was born completely blind, after on eye was fixed (almost) the other didn't take and due to this problem (I have proposed) my standardized test scores reflect my theory about the visual scanning for my one good eye (or lack thereof) when I am given more time to "Scan" the words my score skyrockets and I as of recently scored in the mid 90th percentile range versus scoring as low as 20th (or lower I can't remember) percentile timed.

In other words I was scoring as low as mid 130's timed and as high as 165 with more time...

Darrell

Darrell, don't be so sensitive.

I'm 98% certain ccorsi was referring to him/herself.
quid leges sine moribus vanae proficiunt?

Shira

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 202
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: LSAT Accomodations?
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2005, 04:15:16 PM »
If you have to ask then you have to ask yourself why you are asking. Basically, if you need the accommodations, get them. If not, don't put yourself at an unfair advantage by getting extra time, and don't put yourself at an unfair disadvantage by getting extra time.

If you need extra time, you need it.

I took the LSAT with accommodations but without extra time. Yes, they gave me total cr*p accommodations and as a result I ran out of time on the games section with twelve answers guessed in a row. This wasn't because they didn't give me extra time; it's because the accommodations they provided were absolute sh*t. If you need accommodations *aside* from extra time, make damned sure you know what you're getting, because they are *ssholes about it and won't have time to talk to you a week before the exam or even the day of.

Bit jaded here.

But in short... don't take the extra time unless you need it, but if you need it, take it and don't fret about the pros and cons -- it's not like you have a choice.


I was just wondering what the consensus was and pros and cons (I know most of the pros I believe) are for having a degenerative eye disorder that complicates and compromises your ability for taking the LSAT. I am having an appointment with my neural opthamologist in late June (unfortunately past the June LSAT) and will be evaluated for the seriousness and validity for more time on the LSAT. My question for any of you who know (with the exception of what the LSDAS/LSAC registration/information book states) what happens and how much of a disadvantage will my score be at if I asked for more time based on my eye disorder. BTW this is a legitimate problem that I was born with so please no snyde remarks. The disorder is Hershberg Congenital E.T. complicatd by Strabismus and heightened retinal pigmentosa (since the disorder tacks on disorders over time until I have no sight the original was Hershberg a very rare eyey disorder)
In other words I am blind in my left eye (20/250ish) or 6% vision if you want specifics and this affects my visual field and visual scanning (I am doing more research to present to my physicican later).

Other proof of my claim is that based on what LSAT instructors (several) have told me is that the difference in untimed (or double time) tests should not differ greaatly from timed proctored tests (they will differ but rarely more than 20 percentile points) My current untimed (double timed) LSAT is just over 90th percentille whereas my last highest proctored test (after about 14) is in the 47th percentile).
So what do you think?

Darrell Duncan

PS the rest of my application is very strong including being in the top 5%+ of my graduating class, member of many organizations, honor scoieties, worked in a law firm, published a novel (in press), variety of philantropies, the list goes on and my LOR's are GREAT!.  I will be applying for the next cycle and take the LSAT w or w/o accommodations in October.

 
3.4ish, mid-160's
Accepted: UCLA, Loyola (Los Angeles)
Rejected: USC (whatever!)

*YAY!!!!!!!!*