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Author Topic: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?  (Read 13282 times)

tracigu3

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #50 on: May 13, 2005, 04:28:43 PM »
Sure you're 'expected' to use all of your vacation; just like you're expected to eat and sleep with regular intervals.  Hah!  I work at BigLaw, no one uses all of their vacation.

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #51 on: May 13, 2005, 04:32:02 PM »
HippieLawChick: While BigLaw might help build the skills needed for a successful Public Interest career, it might come at the expense of opportunities to build useful connections for those jobs. At an admitted students' day I attended, I sat at lunch with the school's director of public interest law. Some students asked about doing biglaw for a few years, and she said that it was very possible but harder to do, since a lot of public interest jobs are obtained by connections (not necessarily a problem). Also, a lot of public interest employers want to be sure that you are really committed, and not just burnt out from the longer hours. I would say that you should build a relationship with some of your future potential public interest employers, and make sure you have a good exit strategy before you go in to a big firm.

This is the exact same advice I received at an admitted student's day. A lot of people(naively) think that because Public Interest doesn't pay well,they'll take anybody.

jonstern

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #52 on: May 13, 2005, 04:32:51 PM »
Sure you're 'expected' to use all of your vacation; just like you're expected to eat and sleep with regular intervals.  Hah!  I work at BigLaw, no one uses all of their vacation.

What I meant was those I know are taking their four weeks and claim that this is the norm. Like I said, maybe that isn't true of all firms.

taterstol

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #53 on: May 13, 2005, 04:37:55 PM »
Sure you're 'expected' to use all of your vacation; just like you're expected to eat and sleep with regular intervals.  Hah!  I work at BigLaw, no one uses all of their vacation.

What I meant was those I know are taking their four weeks and claim that this is the norm. Like I said, maybe that isn't true of all firms.

I'll believe that people work some of their vacation time before I believe that they're only billing 50% of their hours...

BAFF213

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #54 on: May 14, 2005, 11:50:46 AM »
My 50% number is an average for a one year time frame for the average associate (new associate) at my biglaw firm.  Sure some days you may be in the office 15 hours and bill every second of it, but others you'll be sitting around waiting on the client to get back to you or waiting for comments from a partner and although you're at work, you're not really doing anything billable.  I'm a clerk, expected to bill to atleast 2500 hours per 12 months.

OK - so if you're expected to bill 2500 hours/year, that means you probably work at least 10 hours a day (either 5 or 6 days a week).

I assume I average atleast, the very least, 1 hour average of non-billable per day; i.e., restroom, coffee, starbucks, chit chat, walking to another associate's office, etc.; everyone is different on this though, I have small-bladder-syndrome so I pee a lot more than most :)

1 hr non-billable for a 10 hr day?  That's a 90% billing rate, far from 50%.  You haven't convinced me...

BAFF213

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #55 on: May 14, 2005, 11:55:20 AM »
My dad works in a big DC firm and I remember watching him work his butt off when I was really young, working tons of hours.  But I think there's something kind of noble, 'manly' if you will, about having a high stress job that pays the bills. 

Exactly.  BigLaw - here I come (well, let's hope).

michigantroll

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #56 on: May 14, 2005, 12:19:08 PM »
My dad works in a big DC firm and I remember watching him work his butt off when I was really young, working tons of hours.  But I think there's something kind of noble, 'manly' if you will, about having a high stress job that pays the bills. 

Exactly.  BigLaw - here I come (well, let's hope).

i hope you have a backup plan.

Ver

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #57 on: May 14, 2005, 02:48:33 PM »
My dad works in a big DC firm and I remember watching him work his butt off when I was really young, working tons of hours.  But I think there's something kind of noble, 'manly' if you will, about having a high stress job that pays the bills. 

Exactly.  BigLaw - here I come (well, let's hope).

i hope you have a backup plan.

Ha ha ha.

I think you have more of a future at BigLarrys than BigLaw.

Secondly, there is nothing "manly" about working in BigLaw to "pay the bills." I think the curve on manlyness tails off at about 40k, anything after that is beyond merely providing for your family and into the realm of excess. There are people who work double shifts at factories so that their families can eat, that's noble. Sitting at a desk for long hours to pay for unneeded luxuries is not.

How can you develop such a perverted sense of what it means to be a man?

V00Jeff

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #58 on: May 14, 2005, 03:09:14 PM »
My dad works in a big DC firm and I remember watching him work his butt off when I was really young, working tons of hours.  But I think there's something kind of noble, 'manly' if you will, about having a high stress job that pays the bills. 

Exactly.  BigLaw - here I come (well, let's hope).

i hope you have a backup plan.

Ha ha ha.

I think you have more of a future at BigLarrys than BigLaw.

Secondly, there is nothing "manly" about working in BigLaw to "pay the bills." I think the curve on manlyness tails off at about 40k, anything after that is beyond merely providing for your family and into the realm of excess. There are people who work double shifts at factories so that their families can eat, that's noble. Sitting at a desk for long hours to pay for unneeded luxuries is not.

How can you develop such a perverted sense of what it means to be a man?

Chill out man.  Everyone doesn't have to make the same life choices as you.
Attending: Columbia

sleazyd

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Re: 'BigLaw' Who Wants it? Who has it? Why?
« Reply #59 on: May 14, 2005, 03:16:33 PM »
I am a pre-1L so I may not know much but I heard a speech by the UW LS Dean Joe Knight here in Seattle and he says he works 80-90 hours a week and has since he was a 1L at Columbia.  He says he budgets his time in weekly intervals of 168 hours. 

I don't have the ability to replicate the compelling nature of his speech but here are some of the key takeaways: Don't constrict yourself with a "need" for sleep.  He says he's trained himself to need an average of 4-5 hours per night.  He answers his email before bed and when he wakes up.  He gets his workout in at 5 am, makes his daughter breakfast before school at about 6am and is off to work by 7:30.  He leaves work about 7pm (in Seattle that is good thing because of the horrible traffic).  He doesn't really eat lunch unless he's meeting a "client" (usually donors and the like).

The point is that you can be really efficient with your time and still spend time with your family, friends etc.  If you can restrict work at the office to stuff that must be done there, and do a lot of the "extras" like answering email at home then your time suddenly becomes a lot more abundant.  As for the idea of 168 hours in a week, as opposed to 24 hours in a day...that is a very novel and productive way of thinking as I see it.  Some days you can be more or less productive as long as you meet your weekly quota.  Assuming BigLaw firms are OK with you coming to work before 8 and getting your "other" stuff done off-campus you may be just fine. 

In closing, the thesis of Dean Knight's speech (which was delivered extemporaneously and very impressively) was to "Think outside the Box."  If you want to get something done and you're only working 90 hours a week, there are still 78 hours left in the week for you to accomplish that thing!