Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Poll

Do you feel that Black Greek Letter Organizations have a purpose

yes- service
 43 (54.4%)
no -they're outdated
 17 (21.5%)
yes- to party
 9 (11.4%)
no- they never should have existed
 5 (6.3%)
huh? blacks have their own fraternities/sororities?
 5 (6.3%)

Total Members Voted: 70

Author Topic: The Black Greek Thread  (Read 68785 times)

iwantin

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #310 on: May 13, 2005, 10:45:28 AM »
 ???
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elegantpearl01

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #311 on: May 13, 2005, 06:29:37 PM »
Hi Brave..

I don't see the point in Black people joining IFC/PHC organizations because unlike NPHC organizations, your association basically (not entirely) ends after college.  NPHC organizations you can go on to work for your organization for the next 50 years, making contacts and having a visible prescence in the community. 

Personally, I found some of the other organizations annoying because everytime there was a joint NPHC-IFC/PHC event at UF, the non-black groups wanted us to "step"...I am like whoa...this isnt a minestral show...we aren't here to entertain..you step. 

What is MECCA? I am not familiar with that term.

I went to a HBCU undergrad so my interactions with non-NPHC organizations were slight. But in law school, I had a chance to interact with other groups. I had some cool buddys that were Delta Chi, Zeta, Delta Gamma, Phi Delt, etc. I think the problem is just our organizations have different traditions/missions so its sometimes hard for one group to understand the other.

I think minorities "congregate" with each other because it feels comfortable. I know at my law school someone made a comment "why do all the black people sit together" my response was "why do all the white people sit together and no one says a thing about that". We sit together because we are comfy with each other. There were 30 black people in my class of 200, so we felt like we had to stick together and look out for each other.

blk_reign

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #312 on: May 14, 2005, 10:04:41 AM »
You know the irony is that there are a few fraternities on some PWI campuses that have become part of the IFC.. the Alphas @ UVA are a part of the IFC – and of course the NPHC has something to say about that…

I’m not saying that White Fraternities/Sororities don’t have purpose but  the stigma that goes along with them (especially the frats) are that they party hard… hard.. keggers etc… crazy hazing situations (interesting that back in 1990 it was a white organization that got the pledging process banned but I digress)

Brave got the term MECCA from me.. it’s a term referencing Howard University since so many of our beloved organizations were founded on their campus…


You guys already know that I went to a PWI and greek life around those parts were fairly large.. there were a lot of white fraternities/sororities on the yard and I remember seeing things from people dragging dorm beds in the middle of the quad to guys running up and down the hall way naked screaming- that sh*t used to piss me off FYI… to the girls getting all dolled up for their rush and whenver the bid came through for them (y did it always seem like 3 in the morning  >:( ) I’d find a bunch of sorority girls at my door asking for my roommate…

Our orgs definitely have different missions and principles but it seems that the service aspect of white fraternities/sororities isn’t prevalent to the common eye.. whereas we pride ourselves in dedication to service you know?


We congregate together because we HAVE to.. same reason that most white people wouldn’t dare apply to a historically black college or university.. they don’t want to be the MINORITY in any situation… we have no choice in this country.. and no fear in that regard because it’s all we know.. so when we see another person of African descent we tend to gravitate towards them.. that doesn’t mean that we limit ourselves or that we’re not interested in getting to know people of other ethnicities.. black people have to stick together in a predominantly white country like the US..

Think about it Brave.. we don’t have a problem dealing with racial relations.. or communicating with people from different backgrounds than we come from.. but look around LSD for example.. take a look at yourself for example.. You don’t know what to say to us… the majority of the white people on this site don’t even enter this discussion board with anything to say.. but they Do lurkhmm what are the black folks talking bout today..  ::)
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

iwantin

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #313 on: May 14, 2005, 10:41:45 AM »
The Kappas at my school are a part of the IFC.  I know the Alphas at UVA, and BLK is SOOO right--they catch it because they are a part of it too. 

Honestly, no one at my school really said anything about the Kappas joining the IFC because they don't do anything.  Panhell doesn't do anything.  All Greek Council doesn't do anything.  (Sadly, the Black Greeks haven't even had the NPHC for a whole year, so they don't do much either.)  Everyone is more about doing what their particular organization does--ALONE.  There are not a lot of collaborations (or none that require a lot of time, planning, or talk of splitting the profit).  The meetings are pointless. 

What I've noticed with white frats and sororities is pretty similar to BLK as well.  About 50% of the guys are in frats and nearly 75%-80% of the girls.  "Pledge night" for the girls--they go around to NUMEROUS parties and try to see who can "make-out" with the most guys!  (It's SOOOO disgusting.)  It's so bad that people put up flyers about catching mono and how the girls should try to be safe during the week of "pledge night."  The campus is a "wet" campus, and I've talked to a number of guys in white frats who said that they have to use beer in order to recruit.  And that is pretty sad.

We congregate because--that's where we feel comfortable.  (Just like BLK said.)  However, there are some blacks who don't talk to the "rest" of us--they only associate with the white students.  (As in, if you see them in passing, they don't speak.)  There aren't many of us here anyway, so it's impossible for us not to encounter someone of a different ethnic, religious, political, etc. background.  I can truly say that the black students have the people skills to be able to associate with all types of people. 

As for the international fraternity, those who are interested in Black Greek Organizations do not participate in formal rush because our organizations don't.  We don't have bids or smokers.  And in addition to that, our organizations are for life.  They are supposed to help us remain dedicated to the community through service--beyond college.  My understanding is that white fraternities and sororities don't stress this during formal rush or even while members are a part of the chapter.  After graduation, the majority no longer work with their organizations.  I don't know how you can stress this with your particular organization, Brave.  :-\  But if you want to get more black students, formal rush is not the way to go.
"You have brains in your head.
You have feet in your shoes.
You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
You're on your own, and you know what you know.
And you are the one who'll decide where you'll go.
Oh the places you'll go."

Rudy Huckleberry

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #314 on: May 14, 2005, 12:00:04 PM »
The Deltas on my campus joined Panhellenic.  Not an insider so I don't know what NPHC had to say about it, but it was a smart move because they were the ONLY really active Black Greek on campus and lots of times were completely left out of the wider Greek loop.  A good friend of mine was DST's rep to Panhell and seemed to think it was very beneficial to the organization.

blk_reign

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #315 on: May 14, 2005, 12:10:24 PM »
I'm sorry.. I didn't realize it was a campus organization :-[



I actually didn't get MECCA from you, BLK.  We have a group on campus called MECCA.  For the life of me, I can't remember what it stands for.

We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

elegantpearl01

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #316 on: May 14, 2005, 12:15:38 PM »
Is MECCA your school's Black Student Union???

A lot of this is foreign to me, because the greek experience at a HBCU is soo different. I would wager most NPHC greeks at my school couldn't name three of the white greek organizations if they had to.

blk_reign

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #317 on: May 14, 2005, 12:19:07 PM »
Unless you're greek isn't the only way that you're going to know about what goes on on campus is through fliers? I'm just saying that the NPHC on campus still operates under the Office of Campus Life- Greek Life department



I agree that it can help, too.  As a IFC rep, I knew everything that was going on around campus -- other than much of what the black fraternities and sororities were doing.  The only way anyone knew they had an event was if you managed to see a flyer for it.
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

HBCU.EDU

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #318 on: May 17, 2005, 02:30:53 PM »
I guess I can agree with this article.



By Jocelyn Stamps
Black College Wire

Jackson State University's Panhellenic Council has imposed a membership cap of 50 new members on the eight active fraternities and sororities on campus.

According to Cathy Patterson, coordinator of Greek affairs at the Jackson, Miss., school, the council voted during the fall semester to limit the number of members an organization can admit during the intake process. Each active fraternity and sorority has a representative on the council, and the measure is now part of the Panhellenic Council constitution.

"The Pan Council felt that this number was more manageable and would foster the development of more brotherly and sisterly relationships," Patterson said.

She said other colleges and universities were surveyed to determine which ones have membership limits and how they had been affected. "Some schools are happy with the caps and some are not, but it is something that other HBCUs do," Patterson said.

Panhellenic representatives were not asked how they voted, but some of their members were clearly vocal about the limit.

James Gordon, an elementary education major from Colewater, Miss., and a member of Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, said that, "If there are more than 50 people that are qualified and are in good standing with the university, they should not be denied the right to participate."

Ashley Davis, a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority and a biology/pre-med major from Natchez, Miss., agreed. "There may be more than 50 that are qualified and if I were in that number, I wouldn't want to be overlooked because of a cap and I knew I had what it takes," she said.

LaRicky Robinson, a Zeta Phi Beta sorority member, said: "More females are interested in pledging than males, and if 60 people wanted to pledge and were qualified, we would take them." Robinson is an elementary education major from Canton, Miss.

John Swope, an English major from Phoenix, and the only member of Iota Phi Theta fraternity at Jackson State, said he felt such decisions should be left up to the individual organization.

However, several members of other Greek organizations said they were ambivalent about the limit because they traditionally have a small number of members and would be unaffected.

"The value of our fraternity is not in numbers, but in men," said James Jones, an English major from St. Louis and a member of Omega Psi Phi fraternity.

Bennie Crayton, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, said the membership limit was a good idea for some sororities known for their large numbers.

"From a male standpoint, the cap has no bearing on us. It is good for females -- it will help them narrow things down," Crayton said. "It's not good to have large numbers. A group loses its luster with large numbers."

Non-Greek students also had mixed feelings.

"Fifty is a pretty decent number to stop at," said Darrian Billups, a broadcast journalism student from Dallas. I don't feel it is right, though, to disregard a person who meets the qualifications based on a cap."

Talamieka McNeil, a graduate student from Jackson, said, "I think 50 is a good number because it creates competition among pledges and leaves a better pool of candidates to choose from. In addition, it will make those who don't make the initial cut work harder and reevaluate themselves."

Membership intake activities must take place between Jan. 10 and Feb. 21.

The active groups at Jackson State are Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, Phi Beta Sigma, Omega Psi Phi and Iota Phi Theta. Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity is inactive on the campus.

kloud9nupe

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Re: The Black Greek Thread
« Reply #319 on: May 17, 2005, 03:03:11 PM »
I went to JSU and this will only affect the sororities. These days, you just can't  get to many people that are down for the process.

I guess I can agree with this article.



By Jocelyn Stamps
Black College Wire

Jackson State University's Panhellenic Council has imposed a membership cap of 50 new members on the eight active fraternities and sororities on campus.

According to Cathy Patterson, coordinator of Greek affairs at the Jackson, Miss., school, the council voted during the fall semester to limit the number of members an organization can admit during the intake process. Each active fraternity and sorority has a representative on the council, and the measure is now part of the Panhellenic Council constitution.

"The Pan Council felt that this number was more manageable and would foster the development of more brotherly and sisterly relationships," Patterson said.

She said other colleges and universities were surveyed to determine which ones have membership limits and how they had been affected. "Some schools are happy with the caps and some are not, but it is something that other HBCUs do," Patterson said.

Panhellenic representatives were not asked how they voted, but some of their members were clearly vocal about the limit.

James Gordon, an elementary education major from Colewater, Miss., and a member of Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, said that, "If there are more than 50 people that are qualified and are in good standing with the university, they should not be denied the right to participate."

Ashley Davis, a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority and a biology/pre-med major from Natchez, Miss., agreed. "There may be more than 50 that are qualified and if I were in that number, I wouldn't want to be overlooked because of a cap and I knew I had what it takes," she said.

LaRicky Robinson, a Zeta Phi Beta sorority member, said: "More females are interested in pledging than males, and if 60 people wanted to pledge and were qualified, we would take them." Robinson is an elementary education major from Canton, Miss.

John Swope, an English major from Phoenix, and the only member of Iota Phi Theta fraternity at Jackson State, said he felt such decisions should be left up to the individual organization.

However, several members of other Greek organizations said they were ambivalent about the limit because they traditionally have a small number of members and would be unaffected.

"The value of our fraternity is not in numbers, but in men," said James Jones, an English major from St. Louis and a member of Omega Psi Phi fraternity.

Bennie Crayton, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, said the membership limit was a good idea for some sororities known for their large numbers.

"From a male standpoint, the cap has no bearing on us. It is good for females -- it will help them narrow things down," Crayton said. "It's not good to have large numbers. A group loses its luster with large numbers."

Non-Greek students also had mixed feelings.

"Fifty is a pretty decent number to stop at," said Darrian Billups, a broadcast journalism student from Dallas. I don't feel it is right, though, to disregard a person who meets the qualifications based on a cap."

Talamieka McNeil, a graduate student from Jackson, said, "I think 50 is a good number because it creates competition among pledges and leaves a better pool of candidates to choose from. In addition, it will make those who don't make the initial cut work harder and reevaluate themselves."

Membership intake activities must take place between Jan. 10 and Feb. 21.

The active groups at Jackson State are Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, Phi Beta Sigma, Omega Psi Phi and Iota Phi Theta. Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity is inactive on the campus.