Law School Discussion

Case with no dough????

Case with no dough????
« on: April 30, 2005, 04:14:04 PM »
I've seen a few people say they wouldn't pay the cost of tuition at Case Western, especially if they didn't receive a scholarship.  I'm interested in hearing from folks who either will be attending or are thinking about attending Case without a scholarship.  I'm curious to know their thoughts because I'm in that boat myself.

To provide you with some background, my options are Louisville (only have to pay in-state tuition), IU-Indy (have to pay out-of-state tuition but with a $5,000/year scholarship) and Case.  I've already resigned myself to the fact that I will have to work at a law firm for several years right out of school to be able to pay down my loan debt, including some from my undergraduate years.  It's also worth noting that the starting salary figures for each school's graduates entering private practice are commensurate with the levels of debt I would take on at each.  My current sentiments have Case in the lead with Indy in second and Louisville in third.

Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2005, 04:38:55 PM »
Don't believe their salary statistics.  I graduated in 2004 and can assure you that real salaries are nothing compared to the salary statistics published by law schools. 

To give you a feel for real salaries, small firm starting salaries range from mid $30's to mid $60's.  So the question to ask yourself is whether you can live on those salaries and repay your loans. 

I would not pay full price for a second tier private school.  IMHO it's simply not a good investment.  Case is a decent school and its top grads can get very good (biglaw) jobs but the average Case grad ends up at a small firm in Cleveland making probably in the forties. 


Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2005, 04:43:59 PM »
Don't believe their salary statistics.  I graduated in 2004 and can assure you that real salaries are nothing compared to the salary statistics published by law schools. 

To give you a feel for real salaries, small firm starting salaries range from mid $30's to mid $60's.  So the question to ask yourself is whether you can live on those salaries and repay your loans. 

I would not pay full price for a second tier private school.  IMHO it's simply not a good investment.  Case is a decent school and its top grads can get very good (biglaw) jobs but the average Case grad ends up at a small firm in Cleveland making probably in the forties. 



'course they've just slipped into the first tier.

Did ya gradute from Case?  Or CSU?  D'ya think CSU is a better deal?  I'm in at Case with money, but my husband is in w/o a scholarship.  Do you think he should go to CSU instead? He's pretty psyched about Case though.

Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2005, 04:45:40 PM »
Would you say other schools on the whole are proportionally lower in their "real" starting salary figures?

Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2005, 04:48:59 PM »
Their move into the 1st tier doesn't really matter because attorneys don't keep up with current rankings.  Besides there isn't that much of a difference between lower first tier and higher second tier in terms of placement. 

I didn't go to Case.  What's CSU? 

Generally I recommend going to the best school you get into.  I graduated from a top 25 school and I know that the rank of my school helped during my job search.  However, IMHO most of the overpriced non-top 30 or so private schools simply aren't a good investment.  The opportunities they offer an average student doesn't make up for the cost. 

Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2005, 04:50:27 PM »
Their move into the 1st tier doesn't really matter because attorneys don't keep up with current rankings.  Besides there isn't that much of a difference between lower first tier and higher second tier in terms of placement. 

I didn't go to Case.  What's CSU? 

Generally I recommend going to the best school you get into.  I graduated from a top 25 school and I know that the rank of my school helped during my job search.  However, IMHO most of the overpriced non-top 30 or so private schools simply aren't a good investment.  The opportunities they offer an average student doesn't make up for the cost. 


Ahh... CSU is Cleveland State, a third tier school that has similar emplyment stats to Case in the Cleveland area at a much lower price. 

Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2005, 04:51:35 PM »
Would you say other schools on the whole are proportionally lower in their "real" starting salary figures?

The only statistics I'd trust would be from top 14 schools.  I graduated from a top 25 school and I can assure you that my classmates are not all making $125K. 

I know what firms generally pay first years and it's not $125K unless it's a biglaw firm. 


Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2005, 04:53:28 PM »
Their move into the 1st tier doesn't really matter because attorneys don't keep up with current rankings.  Besides there isn't that much of a difference between lower first tier and higher second tier in terms of placement. 

I didn't go to Case.  What's CSU? 

Generally I recommend going to the best school you get into.  I graduated from a top 25 school and I know that the rank of my school helped during my job search.  However, IMHO most of the overpriced non-top 30 or so private schools simply aren't a good investment.  The opportunities they offer an average student doesn't make up for the cost. 


Case has some really developed international law & health law programs.  IMO, you shouldn't go to Case if you just want to go work in some standard big firm. Go to Rutgers or something.

Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2005, 04:55:24 PM »
Would you say other schools on the whole are proportionally lower in their "real" starting salary figures?

The only statistics I'd trust would be from top 14 schools.  I graduated from a top 25 school and I can assure you that my classmates are not all making $125K. 

I know what firms generally pay first years and it's not $125K unless it's a biglaw firm. 



In what way do you think they are fraudulent?  Is that the mean is deceptive, with a few high earners throwing off the curve?  Are they not reporting all data?  Or is this just the anecdotal experience of yourself & your friends, that you expected the mean income at your school, and did not receive it?

Re: Case with no dough????
« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2005, 06:50:32 PM »
Some would say that some schools flat out lie.