Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: What would you have done differently when applying?  (Read 1911 times)

The Name's Dali

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1115
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2005, 01:25:36 PM »
When you guys say you would have applied for "application fee waivers", do you mean directly through each school, or through LSAC?

Also, how much does each application generally cost?

wrmusgro

  • Guest
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2005, 01:31:56 PM »
I would have applied to a lot more reach schools. As it is now, I only applied to two real reach schools. But then again, I was a realist and knew that I wouldn't get into them either. It seems that being a 20 something white male who's a former Marine with only an OK GPA and average LSAT score isn't really sought after by most admissions committies. And I knew that. So now that I think about it. Nothing at all. :D

The Truth

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 251
  • Running the Race Figuratively (MS pic sample)
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2005, 02:00:45 PM »
I would have applied to Harvard and Stanford earlier in the year instead of waiting to go complete until Jan so I could have had a better shot of knowing whether I made the cut at those two (instead of hold and waitlist). Should have done those two application like EA that needed to be complete before Nov. 10th if not sooner.

I would have applied to Michigan (I had a fee waiver, although I probably would not have went) to see about $ and because I, like a dummy, paid for 15 LSAC reports at the beginning of the cycle to "save" money from buying them later and then only applied to 11 schools (about 1/2 with merit fee waivers). Definitely Take the LSAT in June (I did) if you can.

I would have only purchased 10 LSAC reports up front if I wanted to save. I applied to Cornell, Chicago, and Northwestern for fee waiver love and negotiations (glad I did though so I could fully consider all options).

I would have sent a letter of continuing interest and addl materials to Harvard once held instead of nothing.

However, I am pretty happy with my situation as I got into and received significant money at my first two choice schools (Penn and NYU) at the beginning of the process. A Harvard acceptance probably would not have swayed my decision given the fact that I liked Penn a lot and it made the most sense with the other location and family stuff I had (but who knows, it is "Harvard" after all and i still have not received my dang letter from my 5/2 decision after the hold).
The One, The Only, The Truth...
Attending: PENN$$$
W/D after Acc.(had next, LOL): NYU$$$,CLS$,CHI$$,GTown$$$,Duke$$,TX$$,NU(loans),Cornell?
WL'ed & then W/D: HLS(after hold), SLS
Rej: NONE
The Truth, The Whole Truth, and Nothing but The Truth
Don't Hate Me, Because You Ain't Me (J/K, LOL)

risingMC

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1251
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2005, 02:54:38 PM »
When you guys say you would have applied for "application fee waivers", do you mean directly through each school, or through LSAC?

Also, how much does each application generally cost?

You can apply through LSAC, and that's the easiest way. If you qualify you'll get your LSDAS registration taken care of, and (I think) you won't have to pay for the LSAT, either. If you get this waiver, most, if not all, schools will accept it in lieu of their application fee. This can easily save you about $500 in fees, possibly more. The only hassle is that you have to have your documents and everything together and turned in months before your LSAT date ... For the Oct exam, I think you had to have everything in by the 1st of August.

You can also ask each school if they have their own need-based fee waiver (I know Yale does), but this is more of a hassle than the above. Some schools will only waive the fee for those who have an LSDAS waiver, and don't have a separate application.

As for costs ... you're looking at $65-$75 for the application itself, plus about $15 for each school your LSDAS stuff is sent to.

wrmusgro

  • Guest
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2005, 06:18:34 PM »
When you guys say you would have applied for "application fee waivers", do you mean directly through each school, or through LSAC?

Also, how much does each application generally cost?

You can apply through LSAC, and that's the easiest way. If you qualify you'll get your LSDAS registration taken care of, and (I think) you won't have to pay for the LSAT, either. If you get this waiver, most, if not all, schools will accept it in lieu of their application fee. This can easily save you about $500 in fees, possibly more. The only hassle is that you have to have your documents and everything together and turned in months before your LSAT date ... For the Oct exam, I think you had to have everything in by the 1st of August.

You can also ask each school if they have their own need-based fee waiver (I know Yale does), but this is more of a hassle than the above. Some schools will only waive the fee for those who have an LSDAS waiver, and don't have a separate application.

As for costs ... you're looking at $65-$75 for the application itself, plus about $15 for each school your LSDAS stuff is sent to.

12 dollars for each school actually. (Unless they've went up since this past November)

Runner-up

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1003
    • AOL Instant Messenger - NShawcross
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2005, 09:58:35 PM »
I didn't give myself much resting time right before the LSAT. I stopped studying about 32 hours before the test, and didn't relax much before that. I got a 150.

That said, perhaps I could have done better on my personal statement and been a little bit more thorough in exploring the ways in which I could have presented my application, but those factors pale in comparison to a lousy LSAT score.

Here's my advice to you: study very hard, but be sure to give yourself enough of a resting period in the final 48 hours before the test.

Aakash

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 38
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2005, 10:14:11 AM »
applied earlier.  i have a feeling that had something to do with the disaster that was this application cycle.

hook em horns.

LSAT SLUT

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 120
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2005, 10:26:17 AM »
thanks to everyone for the advice! it is helpful to those, like me, who will be applying in the future.

one question: many of you said that you wish you had applied earlier. in your view, when is the best time to apply? september? if i take the october test and submit my applications as soon as i get the test results, would that still be too late to apply?

Paperback Writer

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 7840
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2005, 12:02:06 PM »
thanks to everyone for the advice! it is helpful to those, like me, who will be applying in the future.

one question: many of you said that you wish you had applied earlier. in your view, when is the best time to apply? september? if i take the october test and submit my applications as soon as i get the test results, would that still be too late to apply?

If I had to do it again, I'd take the June test and apply as soon as each school made their applications available.  I took the October test, cancelled it, and retook in December.  Because I was unsure of that test, I didn't start applying until I got the results in late December.  I applied to most of my schools in the first week of January.

SuperMoni

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 756
    • View Profile
Re: What would you have done differently when applying?
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2005, 01:27:04 PM »
Overall, I'm really happy with the way my admissions cycle went.  While I wouldn't change much if I had to do it all over again, if I could I would:

-Spend more time studying for the LSAT.  I spent 4 weeks studying for the LSAT, which just wasn't enough time for me.  I really feel that if I had had two more weeks to study my score would have really improved (my practice test scores were sill increasing with each one I took).

-That being said, I would have taken the LSAT again in October if I had the time to devote to studying.

-I would have started working on my personal statement and applications earlier. I applied pretty early (all my apps were out in October and November), but I wanted to get them out in September.  I think it makes a good impression on the school and makes the waiting to hear easier.  My personal statement is what delayed my applications b/c I took longer than expected writing it, but I am in love with the final copy.  I can honestly say that I felt great when sending in my applications because I think my personal statement truly captured who I am.  It's perfect and I'm proud!  ;D

-Finally, I'm in undergrad where taking 5 classes is the norm, but four classes is still full-time and common.  I would have definately taken 4 classes instead of 5 in the fall semester because you really need to devote a lot of time to your applications.  I was so stressed out with so much work and my grades slipped (just a little bit, but the stress sucked) because I was spending my time on my applications, personal statements, etc.  So if you can, consider your applications a class!

Good luck to everyone applying in the future!!