Law School Discussion

College Football

Re: College Football
« Reply #340 on: July 28, 2005, 05:02:24 PM »
AND I reiterate, in no other sport or level of football does the BEST PLAYER not move onto the next level

I think the difference is that in the NFL, there is a much greater risk involved with drafting a player. The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport. The three most important things teams look at when drafting someone are (1) talent (2) room for physical growth (3) performance in college...probably in that order. I'd say that the NBA tends to look at all three of those characteristics as equals, where the NFL places much greater emphasis on physical attributes.
Also, there seem to be more #1 pick busts in the NFL than any other sport. These people tend to be chosen on their performance in college over their ability to develop in the NFL. I'd trade my #1 pick for a #8 and a #15 any day unless another Manning (not Eli) or Vick came around

Re: College Football
« Reply #341 on: July 28, 2005, 05:10:17 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Intuition

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Re: College Football
« Reply #342 on: July 28, 2005, 05:22:01 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Could the transition from aluminum bats to wood bats contribute to that at all? I think it's nearly impossible to compare other sports to baseball since baseball is the only sport where progression to the professional level involves a change in a major piece of equipment.

tegra8

Re: College Football
« Reply #343 on: July 28, 2005, 05:23:19 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Could the transition from aluminum bats to wood bats contribute to that at all? I think it's nearly impossible to compare other sports to baseball since baseball is the only sport where progression to the professional level involves a change in a major piece of equipment.

the amount of offseason wooden bat leagues kinda hurts your case

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Re: College Football
« Reply #344 on: July 28, 2005, 05:26:48 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Could the transition from aluminum bats to wood bats contribute to that at all? I think it's nearly impossible to compare other sports to baseball since baseball is the only sport where progression to the professional level involves a change in a major piece of equipment.

the amount of offseason wooden bat leagues kinda hurts your case

What percentage of those drafted from NCAA baseball by MLB teams have played in wooden bat leagues? How many ABs have they taken on average? And how many ABs have they taken on average with aluminum? I'm sorry, but there is an amazing difference between the two, and three months during the summer is not going to make up for it.

LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: College Football
« Reply #345 on: July 28, 2005, 05:29:54 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Could the transition from aluminum bats to wood bats contribute to that at all? I think it's nearly impossible to compare other sports to baseball since baseball is the only sport where progression to the professional level involves a change in a major piece of equipment.

the amount of offseason wooden bat leagues kinda hurts your case

What percentage of those drafted from NCAA baseball by MLB teams have played in wooden bat leagues? How many ABs have they taken on average? And how many ABs have they taken on average with aluminum? I'm sorry, but there is an amazing difference between the two, and three months during the summer is not going to make up for it.

Hey, get your own thread! This is the COLLEGE FOOTBALL thread. >:(

Thank you. Have a nice day.

TrojanChispas

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Re: College Football
« Reply #346 on: July 28, 2005, 05:39:16 PM »
AND I reiterate, in no other sport or level of football does the BEST PLAYER not move onto the next level

I think the difference is that in the NFL, there is a much greater risk involved with drafting a player. The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport. The three most important things teams look at when drafting someone are (1) talent (2) room for physical growth (3) performance in college...probably in that order. I'd say that the NBA tends to look at all three of those characteristics as equals, where the NFL places much greater emphasis on physical attributes.
Also, there seem to be more #1 pick busts in the NFL than any other sport. These people tend to be chosen on their performance in college over their ability to develop in the NFL. I'd trade my #1 pick for a #8 and a #15 any day unless another Manning (not Eli) or Vick came around

And if you are the best player in college football, you can say that your combination of talent and performance in college were the best, right? If not, then what does "best" mean?

The MVP of a team may not get drafted, but the best player should.  People often use best and MVP interchangeably.  That is not necessarily true.  The best (talent and performance) player must be able to move on to the next level because he could play for any team and improve it, but the MVP (great performance, without the most talent) may just be the lynchpin of a particular team and brings a unique skill set which may not be valuable to every team and thus may not move on to the next level.

The Heisman is frequently not given to the best player, but the MVP.  JMHO.

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Re: College Football
« Reply #347 on: July 28, 2005, 05:40:53 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Could the transition from aluminum bats to wood bats contribute to that at all? I think it's nearly impossible to compare other sports to baseball since baseball is the only sport where progression to the professional level involves a change in a major piece of equipment.

the amount of offseason wooden bat leagues kinda hurts your case

What percentage of those drafted from NCAA baseball by MLB teams have played in wooden bat leagues? How many ABs have they taken on average? And how many ABs have they taken on average with aluminum? I'm sorry, but there is an amazing difference between the two, and three months during the summer is not going to make up for it.

Hey, get your own thread! This is the COLLEGE FOOTBALL thread. >:(

Thank you. Have a nice day.
cosign.

Re: College Football
« Reply #348 on: July 28, 2005, 06:33:42 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Could the transition from aluminum bats to wood bats contribute to that at all? I think it's nearly impossible to compare other sports to baseball since baseball is the only sport where progression to the professional level involves a change in a major piece of equipment.

No, I think that has little to do with it.  Although, I do think college should get rid of turbo aluminum bats.  From a cost perspective, I understand the use.

Everything from fielding to hitting still requires additional polishing before they can go to the majors.

Besides, according to your aluminum bat theory that would mean that pitchers would be ready faster, which isn't the case.  They require the same slow process, if not a longer one.

LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: College Football
« Reply #349 on: July 28, 2005, 06:37:00 PM »
Quote
The transition between playing college football and playing in the NFL is much more difficult than any other sport.

I'm going to disagree.  Baseball is the hardest sport to master.  Most players can't move from college to MLB.  They have to sit in the minors for a few years.

Could the transition from aluminum bats to wood bats contribute to that at all? I think it's nearly impossible to compare other sports to baseball since baseball is the only sport where progression to the professional level involves a change in a major piece of equipment.

No, I think that has little to do with it.  Although, I do think college should get rid of turbo aluminum bats.  From a cost perspective, I understand the use.

Everything from fielding to hitting still requires additional polishing before they can go to the majors.

Besides, according to your aluminum bat theory that would mean that pitchers would be ready faster, which isn't the case.  They require the same slow process, if not a longer one.

In case I was not clear the first time: GET THE FUKK OUT OF THE COLLEGE FOOTBALL THREAD WITH THAT BAT *&^%!

thanks.