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Author Topic: Attrition rates?  (Read 1726 times)

stash33

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Attrition rates?
« on: April 21, 2005, 09:44:17 PM »
Is anyone factoring attrician rates(AR) into their decision making process? I don't expect that anyone goes to LS expecting to fail. One school I am interested in (USD)has a 15%ish AR; the other (UNC) is at 3%. 

Is anyone aware of why USD'S attrician rates are so high? I am from Southern California and know that the eye candy and weather are quite a distraction, but 15% seems very high.

Gary Glitter

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Re: Attrician rates?
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2005, 10:16:13 PM »
attrician (sp) => ATTRITION

typically that 15% is composed to those who cannot spell the word attrition, so beware, you might want to look elsewhere
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stash33

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Re: Attrition rates?
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2005, 10:19:50 PM »
LOL. I guess I do deserve that. Well done.

Paperback Writer

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Re: Attrition rates?
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2005, 10:25:48 PM »
This is one of the reasons why Capital is #3 right now of the three schools I am most considering.  This is assuming, of course, that some of my other waitlist/pending schools don't come through for me.

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Re: Attrition rates?
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2005, 12:25:05 AM »
Is anyone factoring attrician rates(AR) into their decision making process? I don't expect that anyone goes to LS expecting to fail. One school I am interested in (USD)has a 15%ish AR; the other (UNC) is at 3%. 

Is anyone aware of why USD'S attrician rates are so high? I am from Southern California and know that the eye candy and weather are quite a distraction, but 15% seems very high.


just look at their ABA chart. They usually divide the attrition rate into 2 factors: 1) academic and 2) other. "Academic" attrition is usually a result of a harsh grading curve. If there are a lot of people being carved out of the class you will see a large number of people in this column. "Other" is usually a result of financial reasons (i.e. not being able to afford the school), transfers, and people getting in over their head. The average cumulative attrition rate for all schools is 13 percent.

bradzwest

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Re: Attrition rates?
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2005, 12:50:55 AM »
I actually used attrition as key criteria, especially if it was in the academic column.

alkiremays

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Re: Attrician rates?
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2005, 12:29:03 PM »
attrician (sp) => ATTRITION

typically that 15% is composed to those who cannot spell the word attrition, so beware, you might want to look elsewhere

"...composed to..."  grammar is important too.

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Re: Attrition rates?
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2005, 12:36:58 AM »
California Western has ridiculous first year attrition rates- 34%. That's worse than f-ing Cooley!

leoladybug

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Re: Attrition rates?
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2005, 03:20:07 PM »
Where can you find this information on attrition and know whether or not is is a result of a harsh curve??

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Re: Attrition rates?
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2005, 03:31:14 PM »
Where can you find this information on attrition and know whether or not is is a result of a harsh curve??

LSAC.ORG

If the reason is academic, then it is probably due to a harsh curve.  If the reason is other, then it is probably due to a transfer or a personal circumstance.