Law School Discussion

need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify

need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« on: April 19, 2005, 02:50:10 PM »
I have been working at a bank now for 7 months.  My manager has no idea that I am considering law school.  I plan on moving to Tenn. in early August.  When is is appropriate to tell them?  The standard 2 weeks is what seems right to me--but I feel like I might be burning a bridge by not telling them earlier since this is something that I know in advance.  But on the other hand, I don't want to tell them too early and be that person who's leaving in a month and gets bad vibes and guilt trips...

Thoughts?

Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2005, 02:57:48 PM »
Once you know for sure all of the dates, I would speak with your boss.  You do not want to burn any bridges because, for all you know, in the future that bank may need a lawyer and your experience there will help.  I would also make it clear that you are by no means slacking off between now and August.  Maybe volunteer for some overtime if you can to show that you are still committed.  The last thing they want is an employee who knows that he/she is leaving and refuses to do anything

Tony Brooks1

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Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2005, 03:05:15 PM »
This is an interesting thread.  I'm in the same position.  I'm curious what people think.

Harrahs

Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2005, 03:12:09 PM »
i am going to tell my principal that i am not coming back two weeks before the end of the year.  i wouldn't want to be a total d1ck a send her and email from miami in the summer (some teachers switch schools like this), but i also know that if i were to tell her now, she could make the next five weeks very difficult for me.  i wish i was in a position where i could be very open with my boss; many people have positions where they are expected to go back to school, change careers, etc.  it really depends on your particular situation with your employer, but the standard two weeks is certainly professional. 

casino

Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2005, 03:20:32 PM »
i am going to tell my principal that i am not coming back two weeks before the end of the year.  i wouldn't want to be a total d1ck a send her and email from miami in the summer (some teachers switch schools like this), but i also know that if i were to tell her now, she could make the next five weeks very difficult for me.  i wish i was in a position where i could be very open with my boss; many people have positions where they are expected to go back to school, change careers, etc.  it really depends on your particular situation with your employer, but the standard two weeks is certainly professional. 

casino

My immediate supervisor already knows.  But that is between the two of us.  I will submit my resignation and deliver a surprise on all two weeks before my departure date. 

Tony Brooks1

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Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2005, 03:59:51 PM »
Right-I feel bad simply because it's obvious that I put in some effort to make this happen and it's been in the works for awhile.  It's not that I simply stumbled upon a new job and I'm leaving...

That is why I am hesitant to give the standard 2 weeks right in the middle of summer.

Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2005, 04:28:06 PM »
As a human resource manager, I would suggest that you wait until about a month out, especially since you've only been there for 7 weeks.  They won't want to spend another dime developing you into a competent employee and are quite likely to tell you to leave now (unless you're a minority or disabled).  I would highly suggest that you give them a month or less if you want to remain employed*.


*this advice is for the first poster, not for people who have established relationships with their managers

Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2005, 04:54:06 PM »
The OP has has the job for seven months, not seven weeks.  But this is good advice.  Let them know now risks being fired immediately.  I am serious. 


As a human resource manager, I would suggest that you wait until about a month out, especially since you've only been there for 7 weeks.  They won't want to spend another dime developing you into a competent employee and are quite likely to tell you to leave now (unless you're a minority or disabled).  I would highly suggest that you give them a month or less if you want to remain employed*.


*this advice is for the first poster, not for people who have established relationships with their managers

Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2005, 05:02:50 PM »
My mistake.  I still stick by the advice, though.  You're a short-time employee who they have no vested interest in keeping.  Wait until July.


Re: need advice: leaving a job...when should i notify
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2005, 09:25:09 AM »

My immediate supervisor already knows.  But that is between the two of us.  I will submit my resignation and deliver a surprise on all two weeks before my departure date. 

This is an excellent point.  In retrospect, it would have been better for me if I had kept this plan a little more to myself.  My supervisor wrote one of my recommendations, so of course that person knew.  But it's been creating some interesting (and not always positive) vibes in the office, from people who are gunning for my position should it become vancant.  People are also starting to leave me out of some decision-making.  And the uncomfortable thing-I haven't been admitted.  I'm waitlisted.  So now, I may not be able to plan a graceful exit as I had originally intended.

In general though, I think for most professional positions, a month is about right.  Two weeks for hourly positions, especially those with no benefits.