Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: unique majors?  (Read 11727 times)

Ipsa Dixit

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 158
    • View Profile
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #20 on: March 28, 2007, 10:38:32 PM »
Study something you enjoy as an undergrad and that has a good department.  I double-majored in college, one with a tiny but incredibly supportive department (Classics), one with a giant everyone-is-getting-this-degree huge anonymous classes department (Communication). 

I still keep in touch with the professors from Classics.  I enjoyed both areas of study, but the Classics major made for a much richer college experience.

Also, do internships.  That is where you are going to get practical experience.  I did a few and they were invaluable.  Your major doesn't necessarily have to have anything to do with your internships.
'tis herself!

Captain

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3366
    • View Profile
    • http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/5526/thumbid5.jpg
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #21 on: April 03, 2007, 12:06:49 AM »
Pick a major that interests you, that way you will do well in your classes and get good grades. Soft factors help in admissions, but your major is actually not a very important soft factor -- Numbers are still king.

If you PM me, I'll tell you why I don't believe in an undergraduate Business degree....

Ever thought of majoring in Economics? There are a few law schools (Chicago and Mason...) that integrate economics into their program...
VIP.

Captain

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3366
    • View Profile
    • http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/5526/thumbid5.jpg
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2007, 12:10:50 AM »
Seriously though, the best advice ever is this:

Go into college as an Undecided major. Do the Gen. Ed. classes first and get a taste for different subjects, and let that guide you. Try a bit of everything. Take an introductory accounting class -- it's the most boring business subject, so if you can handle it, you can probably deal with being a business major.

Keep in mind that the Engineers and Science students think that the Business majors are stupid, and the Arts majors consider them ignorant tools.
VIP.

pikey

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 11104
  • Did ya do it? Then why are ya sorry?
    • View Profile
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2007, 09:46:43 AM »
I was a BBA (finance and accounting).  I know I'm smart.  @#!* all y'all!  :D 

But honestly, if that's what you enjoy, then go for it.  I did very well in some difficult classes because I enjoyed it and had an aptitude for it.  In the end, that makes all the difference.  If you're not sure that you want to go to law school or plan to take a few years off in between then business is definitely a good choice. 

In addition, MBA programs look for meaningful work experience. It'll be a lot harder to get that experience with a 'random' major.  However, if you decide to go the business route, you'd be better served to pursue a professional designation (CFA, CPA, etc) before (or instead of) an MBA, which are a dime a dozen.
The noobs are so into themsleves you'd think they allready have offers at Tool, Tool, feminine hygiene product & Dumbass LLC

lsn

Captain

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3366
    • View Profile
    • http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/5526/thumbid5.jpg
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #24 on: April 03, 2007, 10:14:55 AM »
In addition, MBA programs look for meaningful work experience. It'll be a lot harder to get that experience with a 'random' major.  However, if you decide to go the business route, you'd be better served to pursue a professional designation (CFA, CPA, etc) before (or instead of) an MBA, which are a dime a dozen.

OK, correct information to follow:

Less than 20% of MBA graduates studied Business at the undergraduate level.

If you do study business as an undergrad, think real hard about doing an MBA. MBA's cover much of the same course content as your undergraduate business programs.

If you are thinking about an MBA, then I recommend studying something in the liberal arts and sciences as an undergrad.

Economics or Math would likely be helpful, but ultimately it won't matter. Arts majors DO get jobs, and MBA programs don't really care what job you had.

---

While you don't really NEED a CFA, Moni is very right. The exams to get all of those CFA/CPA/etc designations are tough, and anyone who can toss those postnominals on their resume/business card is going to be VERY well respected in those fields.

---

I stick to my earlier advice though... I don't believe in the undergraduate business major, but regardless...

Try out a few different subjects (including business) before declaring. Find a subject that you ENJOY and will excel at. If you are planning to go on to a professional school, your grades will matter more than the classes you took.
VIP.

pikey

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 11104
  • Did ya do it? Then why are ya sorry?
    • View Profile
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #25 on: April 03, 2007, 10:23:32 AM »
In addition, MBA programs look for meaningful work experience. It'll be a lot harder to get that experience with a 'random' major.  However, if you decide to go the business route, you'd be better served to pursue a professional designation (CFA, CPA, etc) before (or instead of) an MBA, which are a dime a dozen.

OK, correct information to follow:

Less than 20% of MBA graduates studied Business at the undergraduate level.

If you do study business as an undergrad, think real hard about doing an MBA. MBA's cover much of the same course content as your undergraduate business programs.
If you are thinking about an MBA, then I recommend studying something in the liberal arts and sciences as an undergrad.

Economics or Math would likely be helpful, but ultimately it won't matter. Arts majors DO get jobs, and MBA programs don't really care what job you had.

---

While you don't really NEED a CFA, Moni is very right. The exams to get all of those CFA/CPA/etc designations are tough, and anyone who can toss those postnominals on their resume/business card is going to be VERY well respected in those fields.

---

I stick to my earlier advice though... I don't believe in the undergraduate business major, but regardless...

Try out a few different subjects (including business) before declaring. Find a subject that you ENJOY and will excel at. If you are planning to go on to a professional school, your grades will matter more than the classes you took.

I agree with the bolded, which is why I suggested professional designations.  In response to the italics, just because the majority of MBA's are non-business majors does not mean that the majority of non-business majors get business jobs.  They get MBAs because they do not have a business education. 

If you want a business career, then you have the best shot with a business degree.  People of all backgrounds go into business, but those who are most successful at getting those initial jobs are those who have a business background.  Just like liberal arts types tend to look down on business majors, business people (the ones doing the hiring) often tend to look down on liberal arts majors.  The one exception is econ, which is seen as the next best thing to a business degree (or as one businessperson I talked to put it "the major for those who can't get into business").  Up until 2 years ago, I wanted a business career for most life (and my parents are a CFA and CPA), so I've definitely done my research.  If you are serious about a business career, BBA then designation is one of the best routes to take.
The noobs are so into themsleves you'd think they allready have offers at Tool, Tool, feminine hygiene product & Dumbass LLC

lsn

Captain

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3366
    • View Profile
    • http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/5526/thumbid5.jpg
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2007, 11:23:40 AM »
just because the majority of MBA's are non-business majors does not mean that the majority of non-business majors get business jobs.  They get MBAs because they do not have a business education.

You'd be surprised how many Liberal Arts majors are running major companies, I'm sure. The easiest way to a job on Wall Street is an MBA, the second-best is a Bachelor's in Business, but they WILL hire liberal arts majors, engineers, science majors... Merrill Lynch hired a Hotel Hospitality major while my dad was working there.

Outside of Wall Street, the people who run companies come from a much more varied background. Sometimes they have a business degree, other times they don't. At the upper-echelons you'll see plenty of MBA's, but the BA's associated with them aren't limited to finance or accounting.

Quote
If you want a business career, then you have the best shot with a business degree.

Just about every job is in a "business." So I guess you mean Wall Street? Finance? Investment Banking? Trading?

Quote
People of all backgrounds go into business, but those who are most successful at getting those initial jobs are those who have a business background.

In Banking/Finance/Stock Trading, yes. In other businesses it isn't the case.

Quote
Just like liberal arts types tend to look down on business majors, business people (the ones doing the hiring) often tend to look down on liberal arts majors.
I really really doubt this entirely.

Quote
The one exception is econ, which is seen as the next best thing to a business degree (or as one businessperson I talked to put it "the major for those who can't get into business").
Which is actually funny, because it isn't true (Econ isn't a major for people who somehow can't get into business). I really don't know who you've been talking to, but they're probably just an a-hole.

Listen, study what you want. I'm kind of over the UG obsession with "OMG UR MAJOR SUX0RS!!!1Lol," some people didn't. Business Majors don't study a well-rounded program, and that can (but won't necessarily) come back to bite you in the ass later on.

Business majors tend to score below average on both the LSAT and GMAT (National Institute of Education study). On average, they make less per month than Computer Science majors and Engineers, with most other undergrad majors very close by (US Census Bureau data...)
VIP.

pikey

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 11104
  • Did ya do it? Then why are ya sorry?
    • View Profile
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2007, 11:34:57 AM »
just because the majority of MBA's are non-business majors does not mean that the majority of non-business majors get business jobs.  They get MBAs because they do not have a business education.

You'd be surprised how many Liberal Arts majors are running major companies, I'm sure. The easiest way to a job on Wall Street is an MBA, the second-best is a Bachelor's in Business, but they WILL hire liberal arts majors, engineers, science majors... Merrill Lynch hired a Hotel Hospitality major while my dad was working there.

Outside of Wall Street, the people who run companies come from a much more varied background. Sometimes they have a business degree, other times they don't. At the upper-echelons you'll see plenty of MBA's, but the BA's associated with them aren't limited to finance or accounting.

Quote
If you want a business career, then you have the best shot with a business degree.

Just about every job is in a "business." So I guess you mean Wall Street? Finance? Investment Banking? Trading?

Quote
People of all backgrounds go into business, but those who are most successful at getting those initial jobs are those who have a business background.

In Banking/Finance/Stock Trading, yes. In other businesses it isn't the case.

Quote
Just like liberal arts types tend to look down on business majors, business people (the ones doing the hiring) often tend to look down on liberal arts majors.
I really really doubt this entirely.

Quote
The one exception is econ, which is seen as the next best thing to a business degree (or as one businessperson I talked to put it "the major for those who can't get into business").
Which is actually funny, because it isn't true (Econ isn't a major for people who somehow can't get into business). I really don't know who you've been talking to, but they're probably just an a-hole.

Listen, study what you want. I'm kind of over the UG obsession with "OMG UR MAJOR SUX0RS!!!1Lol," some people didn't. Business Majors don't study a well-rounded program, and that can (but won't necessarily) come back to bite you in the ass later on.

Business majors tend to score below average on both the LSAT and GMAT (National Institute of Education study). On average, they make less per month than Computer Science majors and Engineers, with most other undergrad majors very close by (US Census Bureau data...)

I was referring to initial jobs not top of the pile.  By the time you're running companies you're long past your initial jobs.  In some ways this parallels the top schools argument.  Of course you can get a top legal job from most schools, but its a lot more difficult.

As for the liberal arts thing, its quite prevalant.  Finance/banking/etc companies are waaaaaaaaay more likely to hire business majors for entry level positions (which is what I was referring to).  An MBA is irrelevant to the discussion, because its not entry level.  For most people, you have to do something before you get that MBA.

As I said in my first post, study what you like and have an aptitude for.  It makes all the difference. 
The noobs are so into themsleves you'd think they allready have offers at Tool, Tool, feminine hygiene product & Dumbass LLC

lsn

Captain

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3366
    • View Profile
    • http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/5526/thumbid5.jpg
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2007, 01:42:56 PM »
As I said in my first post, study what you like and have an aptitude for.  It makes all the difference. 

Yeah, before we go any further off-topic. TITCR.

Unless you want to do IP (specifically Patent) Law, then you HAVE TO have a science/engineering degree (although I think there is a loophole where the degree can be in anything, as long as you have a minimum of credits in certain courses -- but that's a PITA).
VIP.

thorc954

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 376
    • View Profile
Re: unique majors?
« Reply #29 on: April 07, 2007, 10:57:05 PM »
major in anything. i did math and it made me more appealing.. got into a great school and what not... however, i had no fun in undergrad.  if i could do it again, i would major in history or poli sci, pledge a frat, and just get drunk and have fun more. 

do something fun.  take swimming and tennis class, law school will be four years away and they really only care about numbers.  the only employers that are going to care are the IP firms, but that work isnt the most enjoying anyway, so if you arent a science/engingeering minded person, there is not point in picking anything specific.