Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: LSAT Prep  (Read 2339 times)

Jipi

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • AOL Instant Messenger - JipiCoon02
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - jipicoon
    • View Profile
    • Email
LSAT Prep
« on: January 30, 2003, 04:41:05 PM »
Hey I just joined up with this message board and was taking a look around.  The last LSAT prep discussion was a lil while ago and seemed to be a debate of program vs. individual study; furthermore, it seemed as though TestMasters might be trying to advertise.  Cutting to the point, I'm a first year undergrad student and I'd like to score high on my LSAT when I take it.  Individual prep is great and an actual course could be worth something.  With specific names of books and programs, would you scholarly people mind gracing me with some advice and suggestions as to what is most effective?  You can always learn from someone elses method as well, so some study techniques would be great too.  Also someone was saying somewhere else on the board that Law Schools average your LSAT scores?? Thanks folks.

sam

  • Guest
Re: LSAT Prep
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2003, 10:25:15 PM »
If you don't believe what people say at about testmasters, do your own research.  For me I actually enrolled in Kaplan first and then heard about testmasters through friends who had taken both Kaplan and testmasters.  The final verdict, more hours, better teachers, etc made me choose testmasters in the end.  But don't take my word for it, just ask around and you'll come up with your own conclusions.  

As far as prep schools are concerned.  If you need a classroom learning environment to study, prep schools are for you.  If you can progressively study on your own, save $1000 bucks or so and buy yourself a nice TV.

   

Bartleby

  • Guest
Re: LSAT Prep
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2003, 04:49:58 PM »
You're not planning to take the LSAT anytime soon, are you? I think the score expires after 5 years, so don't take it until maybe your junior year. You'll probably do better then, anyway, as you go through progressively more challenging courses at college (one would hope, anyway).

Hard to say now whether self-prep or a class is what you'll need. Once you take a practice test, you'll see how much help you need. The games section is particularly tough; that and CR are the ones most of us need help with. If you're not great at standardized tests, then a class would probably be worth it to you.

If you go for a class, check out Princeton Review also...a friend of mine took their class and scored in the mid-160s, enough to get into her first choice school. She graduated in May and passed the bar not too long ago! I haven't taken their LSAT class yet but am also waiting to see if their new "hi-test" class (it has more hours) comes to my area.

But for now, relax. You've got time.