Law School Discussion

Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #30 on: April 09, 2005, 10:29:28 PM »
I would give one word of warning about tier 4's, they are NOT all created equal.  Some are good institutions, but some are horrible and will not give you the preparation and support you need, choose your school very very carefully.  It's not all about the ranking, but it is all about the school.  So buyer beware is all I can say.  With higher tier schools you can expect a certain level of quality, with tier 4's there are some real bad ones that will just serve to take your money.

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #31 on: April 09, 2005, 10:44:37 PM »
With some of the schools you wonderfuls are going to, I'd watch making fun of the People's College of Law site.  While it's certainly awful, so are all of you.
]

No.... People's College O Flaw robs innocent (albeit naive) people of their hard earned money with the promise of becoming lawyers.  Go to their website.  Read their stats.  It is certainly awful, and since I don't mislead people and steal their $$, it is certainly more awful than me.

I just went to their website, because I had never heard of this school, and it doesn't look as bad as all that.  It's just not "law school" in the traditional sense-- they are up front about their grads making little money-- I think they said something like "if you want to make money go elsewhere".  Looks like PI/activist training grounds to me.  I don't see how they can be stealing people's money when their tuition is only $4000 a year, their professors are VOLUNTEERS, and they are non-profit.

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #32 on: April 09, 2005, 10:49:54 PM »
I would give one word of warning about tier 4's, they are NOT all created equal.  Some are good institutions, but some are horrible and will not give you the preparation and support you need, choose your school very very carefully.  It's not all about the ranking, but it is all about the school.  So buyer beware is all I can say.  With higher tier schools you can expect a certain level of quality, with tier 4's there are some real bad ones that will just serve to take your money.

well-said!  I think that when you are looking at tier 4s & 3s you can't afford to be lazy-- you really have to do research. But some of them are very worthy.

mpfg

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #33 on: April 10, 2005, 05:37:09 AM »
Richard Parsons, CEO Time Warner, Albany Law School !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :o

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #34 on: April 10, 2005, 06:30:03 AM »
A local judge where I live went to Valpo T4.

Her advise when I asked her the very same question - "a law degree is a law degree, more important than where you go is who you know". Granted, the net result of going to a higher ranked school is that the recruiting and placement is probably going to be better.

However, too many people are looking at the prize at the bottom of the box and forgetting that they have to eat through 3 years of cereal to get to it. Regardless of where we end up going, we are going to have 3 years in the legal community where we are going to have tremendous opportunities to network with many different people who have a participatory role within that very same community - at many different levels. Get in and then go forward. If you are at a T3 or T4 school, you might have to work a little harder but we are adults and if you know that Big Law doesn't recruit at your school - then be proactive and go to them if that is where you want to end up.

Advise from a 34 YO (old man) who has been working for a number of years now - don't wait for them to come to you. It's kind of like the ugly guy trying to get the girl. If you can't get her with your looks alone, then start feeding her drinks. If you get her drunk enough, she will sleep with anyone. Big Law (good jobs) work the same way, if you are proactive and can feed them drinks along the way, then you stand a chance of getting in their pants when you get out. If not, wait around until the bar closes and go home with the ugly girl - in the end, you're still getting some action.

twarga

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Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #35 on: April 10, 2005, 07:05:25 AM »
This whole tier thing reminds me of teenagers who are hooked on brand names.  They wouldn't be caught DEAD shopping at WalMart for clothes, and they wouldn NEVER stoop to going to a tier 4, even if it meant a free ride and (with good enough grades) a comparable job. 

I looked at the 4 schools I was accepted to and picked my tier 4 because once you peel off the labels and look at each one objectively, Widener was the clear frontrunner (for me, that is).

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #36 on: April 10, 2005, 10:20:15 AM »
As of right now, I'll be attending a Tier 4 school PT. However, I'll also be working in the industry I plan to practice in throughout the four years I'm in school. To me, that adds up to almost $20 K in my 401 k each year I'm in school, tons of networking experience, and a salary that at the end of four years will be comparable (if not more ) than most first year lawyers. That's me without a law degree. Passing the bar will surely bump those numbers up a bit. So, in the end, sure I would love to go to a higher ranked school, but, regardless I think I'll do as well as a lot of 1st and 2nd tier students without any experience. 

A.J

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2005, 10:29:01 AM »
Look at the bar passage rate, starting incomes and employment rates for grads and then decide if its worth it to you.

Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2005, 10:29:40 AM »

NJHandyGirl

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Re: Is going to a 4th tier even worth it?
« Reply #39 on: April 10, 2005, 11:10:01 AM »
Look at the bar passage rate, starting incomes and employment rates for grads and then decide if its worth it to you.

Um...and while you're at it, research whether the school curriculum is specifically geared towards passing the bar and not much else; if the starting incomes are on par with the locale you will be practicing in (ie: $100k in NY = $60k in places with a lower cost of living) and make sure the school does not hire grads to boost their employment ratings.  8)

Basically, it all depends on what works for you and how you put those 3 years to use.