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Author Topic: tell me, tell me, tell me  (Read 2584 times)

EPH05

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #40 on: April 14, 2005, 11:11:19 PM »
Federal Farmer, I think your views about moral relativism are dangerous.  It seems like you have no moral code, I mean if you could get away with it and there were no reprisals would you beat someone up to get into the law school of your choice?

exposé

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #41 on: April 14, 2005, 11:21:04 PM »
Federal Farmer, I think your views about moral relativism are dangerous.  It seems like you have no moral code, I mean if you could get away with it and there were no reprisals would you beat someone up to get into the law school of your choice?

with an iron pipe  8)

ccorsi

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #42 on: April 14, 2005, 11:21:41 PM »
Dear AdCom,

I am writing this letter of recommendation on behalf of EPH05.  Although I have only known him a short time, he is of the highest moral character and his integrity sets him apart from most in society.

He is, however, completely detached from reality and seems to not know when to give up an argument.  I think in time he will learn not to attach his ego to a point of view and when that maturation process begins - he will be a fine attorney.

Please consider him for your law school unless you want to produce attorneys who will handle guilty clients.  He would be terrible at that.  If you plan on producing attorneys that will handle only innnocent clients - well he will be great at that.

Also, if you don't accept him he is talking about applying to our graduate school here and I am growing weary of his holier than thou attitude - so I would consider it a personal favor if you would accept him.

Thanks,

Professor X

hilljack

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #43 on: April 14, 2005, 11:25:52 PM »
When an ethical person preaches about unethical behavior he is 'holier than thou?'

And this is considered a bad thing?

Man, I can think of a lot of people I used to respect; but they insisted that people act morally, geuss those people sucked, huh.

ccorsi

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #44 on: April 14, 2005, 11:28:38 PM »
If he were merely being ethical than I would agree.

If law professors that used to be adcoms write about an accepted practice - who the hell is he to judge it unethical?

And when he tells people they are wrong for the practice he is being holier than thou.

C2

hilljack

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #45 on: April 14, 2005, 11:36:18 PM »
telling someone they are wrong for doing something is holier than thou

is this a bad thing? is accountability a bad thing? that is: is holding others accountable a bad thing?

kristay

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #46 on: April 14, 2005, 11:51:18 PM »
5) I notice that no one has even tried to tell me that admissions offices themselves think this is an acceptable practice.  In the end of the day they're the ones that matter if you're trying to get into law school, and as such I it makes this whole debate a pretty open and shut case.


Actually, I did.

You quoted a law professor who may have been on an admissions committee, but you didn't in anyway attempted to prove that this was a generally accepted practice according to admissions offices themselves.  Yes, one somewhat relevant person thinks it is acceptable, but what schools accept this as policy?  Certainly none of the schools that encouraged applicants to waive access to their LORs (everyone I applied to).  To my knowledge and assumably to Kaplan-Newsweek’s knowledge this is a strictly forbidden practice to law school admissions offices.

Just because someone waives their right to access a letter in no way means that that person has not seen the letter.  2 of my letters were given to me.  Does that make me unethical?

EPH05

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #47 on: April 15, 2005, 01:30:56 AM »
     Waiving access to your letters of recommendation actually means not looking at them, the two things should be synonymous.  If without asking your recommender just gives you the letter or tells you what's in it there's not much you can do though and it is not really your fault in my mind. 

     Also, I'm sorry if anyone got the impression that I was calling them unethical, I was calling certain actions unethical.  I think we've all done something in our life unethical, but we're not all unethical people.  With this knowledge in hand I'm not trying to judge people, but I am trying to point out the difference between ethical and unethical behavior.

jg983

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #48 on: April 15, 2005, 01:41:49 AM »
I haven't read this whole thread, so forgive me if I'm reiterating something that's already been said. I read a book by the former dean of Harvard Law, and her response to the question, "What should I do if someone asks me to write my letter of recommendation on his or her behalf?" was something to the effect of: Absolutely. Do it. You've been given an invaluable opportunity. As long as the person is alright with it, you're doing absolutely nothing wrong, and you should take advantage of what you've been given.

I don't think this practice is frowned upon at all. And, for the record, plagiarism is the representation of another's words as your own WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT. Get off your high moral horse and learn the law, feminine hygiene product.

EPH05

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Re: tell me, tell me, tell me
« Reply #49 on: April 15, 2005, 01:58:39 AM »
I haven't read this whole thread, so forgive me if I'm reiterating something that's already been said. I read a book by the former dean of Harvard Law, and her response to the question, "What should I do if someone asks me to write my letter of recommendation on his or her behalf?" was something to the effect of: Absolutely. Do it. You've been given an invaluable opportunity. As long as the person is alright with it, you're doing absolutely nothing wrong, and you should take advantage of what you've been given.

I don't think this practice is frowned upon at all. And, for the record, plagiarism is the representation of another's words as your own WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT. Get off your high moral horse and learn the law, feminine hygiene product.

   Some people in the world of law school see this as an acceptable practice, but I argue that it is an extreme minority view among admissions committees.  The practice is very much frowned upon by many admissions committees and law school admissions books.  Plagiarism does not rely on consent according to any dictionary I own, it is simply passing off the ideas of another as your own.  In this case the recommender is plagiarizing the applicant who wrote the LOR by passing it, or some similar version of it, off without citation or note.