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Author Topic: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance  (Read 8911 times)

jgruber

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LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« on: May 26, 2004, 04:18:28 PM »
I've heard a number of complaints about the LSAT along the lines that it is not a good measure of intelligence or likelyhood of success in law school.

Let's assume that is true.

What would you replace it with?  How would you determine who is admitted to law school?  What would you use to measure intelligence and the likelyhood of law school success?

nathanielmark

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2004, 04:20:20 PM »
i would scrap the games and add a scored writing section.

Ginatio

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2004, 04:21:40 PM »
I love the games section. And the type of thinking it takes to do them correlates to law fairly well.

i would scrap the games and add a scored writing section.

nathanielmark

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2004, 04:24:50 PM »
the problem with the games is that they introduce most of the variability into the test scores that is, in my opinion, the main shortcoming of the LSAT.


I love the games section. And the type of thinking it takes to do them correlates to law fairly well.

i would scrap the games and add a scored writing section.

jgruber

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2004, 04:27:35 PM »
I have to disagree about the games section parelleling legal work.  It's logic, but it a purer form than you'll ever need in legal work.  Legal work -- in my opinion -- is more about persuasion than logic.

Munkeysgrrl

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2004, 04:31:59 PM »
More weight needs to be put on grade trends, experience, background, etc., and less on a 1-time test score.  Just b/c you got a high test score doesn't necessarily mean you are going to do well in law school.  Many people have faced the burden of working during school or being involved in multiple EC's and still succeeded academically despite the stress.  Knowing how to cope under extreme pressures might come easier for these people, and they might be able to adapt better to the rigors of law school.
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dsong02

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2004, 04:33:20 PM »
i think it should be replaced by a flexibility test. 

whoever can bend over the most gets into the top schools.
'why does it hurt so much when i poke it?'

Tobias Beecher

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2004, 04:54:12 PM »
although this test is so freaking hard, i would like to leave it where it is.


sodashi

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2004, 05:12:05 PM »
yes, agreed...

I don't think the test itself should change, but the admissions process and weights. I personally don't think the test is a great indicator of skill or ability or even future success in law school.

M2

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Re: LSAT Replacement - Here's Your Chance
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2004, 05:17:39 PM »
The games have got to go...

I think the games are learnable if one has a sufficient amount of time...
The thing is, that in "learning" how to setup and evaluate  the games one does not become better at analytical reasoning, one simply becomes better at diagramming games.

The same is not true with the RC and LR sections. Studying for these sections actually does increase one's reading comprehension or logical reasoning abilities.