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Author Topic: Academic Dismissal  (Read 952 times)

kwl123

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Academic Dismissal
« on: April 09, 2008, 06:50:19 PM »
After first year of law school, I was dismissed for not acquiring a 2.0 GPA average. At this time, I have completed my two year academic probation period. I want to return to law school and complete my legal education. I am planning on retaking my LSAT, because of my low score. I would appreciate any advice regarding my situation.  Is there anyone that has been in my situation and has been readmitted to law school?  

RobWreck

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Re: Academic Dismissal
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2008, 11:17:14 PM »
I'm missing what good retaking the LSAT would do you? Are you going to try to get into a different/better law school than the one you were dismissed from? A better LSAT score won't offset the fact that you crapped out (sorry to be blunt)... is there a particular reason why you did so poorly? You need something that's going to show that you are not going to achieve the same degree of success that you did the first time around, and I don't think a higher LSAT score is going to do that...
Sorry,
Rob
St. John's University School of Law '11
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Lawbster

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Re: Academic Dismissal
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2008, 11:26:50 PM »
I'm missing what good retaking the LSAT would do you? Are you going to try to get into a different/better law school than the one you were dismissed from? A better LSAT score won't offset the fact that you crapped out (sorry to be blunt)... is there a particular reason why you did so poorly? You need something that's going to show that you are not going to achieve the same degree of success that you did the first time around, and I don't think a higher LSAT score is going to do that...
Sorry,
Rob

I disagree.

The curves at TTTs can be pretty brutal. At my school, the median is almost a B+. I think like a 2.75 puts you in the top 99% of the class and it's impossible to fail out, well almost impossible.

If he retakes LSAT and reapplies, and gets into a good school, I doubt he will have to worry. Schools primarily care about LSAT and gpa. Naturally, he will need an addendum, but I don't think it's a deal-breaker.

However, I'd make sure to attend a Tier 1 at the lowest.

RobWreck

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Re: Academic Dismissal
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2008, 12:03:18 AM »
The LSAT is merely predictive of how one will perform in law school (and acknowledged as not a very good one at that, merely the best one available). However, actual law school grades are HIGHLY indicative of how one will perform in law school. If that holds true, then s/he needs something that will show why s/he will do better the second time around and why a school should give him/her one of their incoming 1L seats when there are plenty of people that haven't met academic failure that would want that spot.
I don't have a good suggestion on what to do, merely criticism that retaking the LSAT probably won't be nearly as helpful as it would be for a 0L applicant. Perhaps see if there's some way to take a law school class over the summer and demonstrate the ability to handle the work?
Rob

PS: Without any other information, such as GPA, prior LSAT scores or even what school s/he was dismissed from, it's kinda hard to say 'attend a T1 at the lowest', especially with a demonstrated lack of sucess in law school. :(
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Peaches

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Re: Academic Dismissal
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2008, 02:01:33 AM »
Agree with RobWreck.  OP should only reapply to law school if there were significant uncontrollable impediments to law school success in Round 1 that have since been completely resolved.  (Caretaker for terminally ill parent, severe physical illness, mental illness that has since been resolved, effects of a rape or assault, death of a significant other or child...)