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Author Topic: Digital Textbooks  (Read 596 times)

Bob23

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Digital Textbooks
« on: March 02, 2008, 04:49:34 PM »
Has anyone ever un-binded their Casebooks and scanned them to .pdf? I'd love to be able to shed the extra 20lbs in my backpack, and wouldn't be absolutely against destroying the books. Thoughts?

mike4488

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Re: Digital Textbooks
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2008, 05:13:54 PM »
Sounds great but it would take you about five years to do.
Boalt Hall '10

Bob23

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Re: Digital Textbooks
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2008, 06:55:25 PM »
Let's assume that one has access to a high-speed, commercial grade scanner that could probably do 4000 pages in ~2hrs. Any downsides I'm missing?

mike4488

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Re: Digital Textbooks
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2008, 07:08:18 PM »
hmmm, I don't know.  I mean it would be a major plus to have them on a laptop for portability reasons but having hard copies is a major plus.  At least I highlight and write in the margins and such.  Also, I don't know if you have ever tried to read continuously on a computer screen as much as you have to read in law school but it isn't much fun.  I print everything out and read hard copies.  I mean if you can tear your books apart and scan them on your computer and then rebound them into smaller sections that would be a major plus.  Like have 200 page sections bound instead of a 1400 page casebook.  Hopefully that makes sense.
Boalt Hall '10

cesco

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Re: Digital Textbooks
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2008, 07:15:09 PM »
At least I highlight and write in the margins and such. 

That would be my concern.  I highlight and write all over everything.  I am a huge book brief-er, and use a 4 color pen + highlighter + pencil.  Perhaps overkill, but thats how I learn.  Whenever a professor emails a reading assignment, I always have to print it off.

If you are concerned with the weight, another option is to unbind your books, keep everything in a 3 ring binder, and then just bring the relevant portions of the readings with you each day.  Seems like a lot of extra work to me, but I have a classmate that does this.
2L

Bob23

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Re: Digital Textbooks
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2008, 12:48:38 AM »
I was thinking if I had them in .pdf, I could print the relevant portions for class. However, it would seem like just as good of an idea to simply have them un-bound and hole punched. I'm not sure it's worth the effort to have them scanned, when they will end up being printed anyway. I too can't stand to read more than a page or two solely on screen. In reality, if I had them in .pdf, I'd print them, read them, highlight, and still probably take it to class. My hope of going completely paperless is probably unreasonable.

mike4488

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Re: Digital Textbooks
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2008, 08:24:12 AM »
Yeah, I think the idea is great but it probably just isn't very feasible.  I wish they just sold a pdf version that would accompany the textbook so you could have both.  never heard of such a thing so.  I think the .pdf is more of a hassel than it is worth and won't be that beneficial.
Boalt Hall '10

resipsaloquitur

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Re: Digital Textbooks
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2008, 09:47:02 AM »
One of my profs is working on an electronic casebook (with West or Lexis, not sure which). He talked about it and from what I understand, you get a hard copy of the book and book comes with some sort of access key to a secure site where the electronic version is located.  The electronic version will have  links to cited cases, statutes, terms of art, whatever inside of it.

I asked him if you could take notes in the electronic casebook and he said he didn't think that was how it would work.  You could copy and paste the text into another program like a word processor or note taking program, and type in notes from there.

I could see how it might be really useful with OneNote since I think OneNote lets you tag portions of text (e.g. maybe you could create a tag for "holding", "rule", etc. and apply those to the case and also type your notes alongside the text.  I am not a heavy OneNote user though so I am not entirely sure I am being accurate as to the functionality.

I'm really curious about it at any rate.  I had my books unbound and rebound into smaller pieces because of the weight.  Works really well, but it would be even better to not need to carry them around at all!