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Author Topic: State Supreme Court Judicial Internship vs Small-Mid Law SA  (Read 2317 times)

dukedogalley

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State Supreme Court Judicial Internship vs Small-Mid Law SA
« on: February 21, 2008, 09:11:53 PM »
Here is my dilema...I sent out a large number of cover letter/resumes to mid/small size firms last week (after getting about 30 or so big law rejections) and have yet to hear back from anyone.  After sending those out I sent out a handful of letters/resumes to state supreme court justices and district ct judges.  Today I received an interview offer from a state supreme court justice.  I would prefer a paying job this summer, but I know state supreme court internships are limited.  So, I am not sure what to do, should I try to delay the interview in the hopes that I get an interview for a SA?  I am not going to go to an interview with a judge unless I am plan on accepting the job if she offers it to me during the interview.  Any advice would be greatly appreciated.  Also, what is considered better on a resume a small/mid SA or a judicial internship at the state supreme court?  FYI - I plan on going the corporate law route after graduation.  My fall grades put me in top 5% at a T2.

Thanks.

vaplaugh

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Re: State Supreme Court Judicial Internship vs Small-Mid Law SA
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2008, 10:22:37 PM »
What state?

I think the judicial internship sounds better than small/midlaw unless the latter pays well.  Your grades will position you well for a 2L SA gig, anyway.

mutual_biscuit

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Re: State Supreme Court Judicial Internship vs Small-Mid Law SA
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2008, 10:55:05 PM »
(a) What makes you think you'll get the internship?
(b) The judge certainly won't make you an offer on the spot and you probably won't even interview with the actual judge, probably the judges clerk. 
(c) Never pass up an interview until you get an offer, then you can worry about the other stuff.
(

dukedogalley

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Re: State Supreme Court Judicial Internship vs Small-Mid Law SA
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2008, 11:09:51 PM »
(a) What makes you think you'll get the internship?
(b) The judge certainly won't make you an offer on the spot and you probably won't even interview with the actual judge, probably the judges clerk. 
(c) Never pass up an interview until you get an offer, then you can worry about the other stuff.
(

I am not sure I will get the internship...but, i know two 2Ls who encountered this situation when interviewing for 1L summer internships, one was offered the judicial internship at the conclusion of the interview and the other the judge personally called 2 hours after the interview....my point is that I do not want to go into an interview with a judge unless I am willing to accept the position in the even she does make the offer(I can't imagine telling a state supreme court justice "thanks for the offer, I'll consider it, weigh my options, and get back to you")....I guess the question I am asking is if it is better to take a judicial clerkship at the NJ supreme court (IF it was offered) or better to postpone the interview in the hopes of securing a paying SA interview...

jacy85

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Re: State Supreme Court Judicial Internship vs Small-Mid Law SA
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2008, 08:26:12 AM »
Take the internship.  Odds are low that you'll get a paying job, and you'll get great experience and have a lot to talk about in fall OCI interviews about your time with the judge.  On top of all that, judges have A LOT of connections, they know a lot of people, and having a supreme court justice as a reference and/or willing to make a couple phone calls on your behalf is invaluable.

vaplaugh

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Re: State Supreme Court Judicial Internship vs Small-Mid Law SA
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2008, 09:16:16 AM »
I don't think it's a problem to ask a judge for a week or two to get back to them.  They probably understand that most students are broke and taking an unpaid position might need some consideration.  Maybe I made a serious faux pas, but I waited two weeks to tell a federal judge "no thanks."

It's not unreasonable to expect to be offered the internship from the judge on the spot.  I went to four interviews with judges, three of which made the offer on the spot.  The fourth wanted me to send a "letter of intention" before offering the job.