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Author Topic: Class of 2011  (Read 49840 times)

clee750

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #110 on: July 16, 2008, 11:45:46 AM »
First I would read law school confidential. It gives you some practical tips on how to study day to day and at least makes you feel for confident. Also I ordered the LEEWS course. I just listened to the CD's and read the book. This also has some practical tips and makes you feel more confident about the test.

Next remember what your goals is. At the end of the semester you have one test in each class. You need to figure out how to do better than your classmates during those 3 hours.

Preparing for class and preparing for an exam is not the same thing. When you read a case there will be a bunch of stuff in there that is not relevant. Also the professor will ask questions that might not be relevant. I mean, does it really matter what the lower court decided and why they decided it, maybe not, I would rather know what the rule is now and what the resoning is. So put your focus on preparing for the exam and not for class. When you read a case, look for what the rule is and some reasoning, also know some facts to help you know what the context is. Knowing whats in the case, think to yourself, how would I argue this on the exam, how might this issue come up.

What should you do day to day. Go to every class and read every case. Pay attention. The professors talk about the exam time to time so listen to that. Some professors want you to state the rule like you would to a client and explaint it, some want you to just go into the issue like you were talking to a partner. Remeber and write down when they say stuff like that. Personally i used study aids alot. Before class or maybe the weekend before, I would do the reading, brief some, then use supplements and outlines to help me understand. Then using the cases, briefs, and supplements I would make my own outline. Then before class I have the topic for that day outlined. In class i have the information in front of me. Most of the time the teacher is just repeating what I already have written down but sometimes they will give something new or state something differently than i have it. So write that down, add it to your outline, change your outline. Try to stay ahead of things.

As the semester progresses review your growing outline. Edit your outline. Maybe you used to have a few lines on an element of battery. But now you know what intent is so maybe you edit it down to one line, maybe you get rid of it completely. As you read and shorten your outline you learn it more. I might have a 60 page outline that ends up being 20 pages. You need something short to take into the exam. Something quick you can look at to refresh your memory. Time is short on the exam.

Practice, practice. Get old exams. Some are on the school site, but there are plenty online. Take an exam, answer the questions, practice using your outline. Practice writing out elements of certain issues. You should be able to write out the elements for battery in no time. Then you can move on to the analysis.

How can I do well on the exam. If the professor wants the elements then list them quickly. Determine what issues are important. Then analyze that issue. Take facts and argue them. Really nit pick the facts. Argue both sides, plaintiff will previal because, or will fail because, defendant will previl or fail because, remember because. Dont just say something, explain why. Learn to spot issues, then tear the facts apart to argue that issue. Make unique arguments. Make the professor say, oh, i did not think about that. You need to know the rules of law and the elements cold. You dont have time to think about what supplemental jurisdiction is. You need to spend your time making a strong argument for each issue and for each side. Everyone in that room will know the rules of law. You have to take the facts and agrue them well if you want to do well.

At some point how smart you are matters. Some people spot issues better than others, some can argue better and analyze things better. However, how hard you work matters also. But work smart as well. Dont waste your time reading everything out there. Study and read with the exam in mind. Ask yourself how this will help on the exam, how will this come up, how will I argue it.

Remeber that the way you study for torts might not be the same way you should study for civ pro. Maybe those teachers want completely different things.

Hope that helps some, feel free to ask anything else.

Eugene Young

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #111 on: July 17, 2008, 02:12:11 PM »
That's some really goood advice. Thanks.

philosophia

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #112 on: July 17, 2008, 05:32:19 PM »
clee,

Thanks for the advice!  As far as supplements are concerned, did you have any faves for certain classes, etc?  I have heard different suggestions for this... law school confidential lists some and other students have mentioned that their accuracy and helpfulness depend on which casebook you use, etc.?

Did you find it difficult to find study materials in the library?  Were other students cut-throat and trying to sabotage others?  I heard this could be a problem, so I wanted to get your thoughts!!!

Thanks in advance.

clee750

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #113 on: July 18, 2008, 12:35:59 AM »
I used the gilberts or emmanuels outlines. Law school confidential has some suggestions that I followed. There are also examples and explanations books. I did not use them but my torts teacher actually recommended it and I wish I used it for civ pro. There are also flash cards that I found helpful. If you really want to study hard you can get hornbooks that explain things in more detail. I found that most of the commercial outlines followed the case book well. Contracts did not follow exactly but it was not hard to match up the sections. Some of the commercial outlines are made to go with a specific casebook, so look for those. I depended on them alot and found them really helpful. I also found that their were accurate to the casebook and what my professors were saying. However, do what works best for you.

As far as finding stuff in the library, you have to do this for legal bibliography. It is not hard to find stuff just annoying. If you cant find something just ask the librarians or ask a friend. It takes like an hour a week, but just get it done early on so you dont have to worry about it. After that, anything you might want to find in the library is easy to find.

In regards to other students, everyone is really nice. No one is cut throat and no one is trying to sabotage anyone. I found that people are willing to study together, offer help, work together and even share outlines. If there are mean people in class, I did not meet them. I found people generally nice and helpful. Law school is a competition in a way, but it did not feel competitive. Remember that there is no way of knowing how well someone will do in law school. The guy that seems super competitive, answers every question in class and studies all the time might end up at the bottom of the class, while the person who seems really laid back about everything might end up at the top. 

philosophia

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #114 on: July 18, 2008, 09:24:15 PM »
Thanks!

Re: books...

Has anyone tried to order them online through the bookstore?  I tried but they wanted payment info upfront.  I thought we were going to be given some kind of credit pending financial aid disbursement!?! Thoughts/info?


t1016

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #115 on: July 20, 2008, 07:06:05 PM »
thanks for the info, clee750..

Philosphia.. I did call the office about that last week and she said that typically law students receive their refunds earlier than other students ( along with book credits) they have not released money yet, but will begin doing so at the end of July..

she also said we should be receiving emails when the money is released.

Miracles and  Blessings!

philosophia

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #116 on: July 21, 2008, 03:57:33 PM »
Excellent information! Thanks, t!


matta

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #117 on: July 22, 2008, 04:08:20 PM »
thanks for the info, clee750..

Philosphia.. I did call the office about that last week and she said that typically law students receive their refunds earlier than other students ( along with book credits) they have not released money yet, but will begin doing so at the end of July..

she also said we should be receiving emails when the money is released.


We got some very different information regarding loan disbursement.  I was told that financial aid comes in on August 18th and would not be disbursed to our accounts until late August.  Given GSU's history, I'm planning on not receiving anuthing (except for book credits) until at least August 25th.  I would suggest everyone plan accordingly.

lkjfdsa

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #118 on: July 22, 2008, 07:32:56 PM »
I didn't ask about when our funds would be disbursed, however, it sounds like they are going to adjust all of our COLs to accomodate the increase in tuition.  I don't think that's supposed to happen until next week though.  Someone is out of town.

matta

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Re: Class of 2011
« Reply #119 on: July 23, 2008, 12:14:20 AM »
Mine was updated on Monday, right before my GradPlus status changed to accepted.