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Author Topic: Two Interviewers v. One of me  (Read 2052 times)

kerminsky

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Two Interviewers v. One of me
« on: January 29, 2008, 04:26:53 PM »
Can anyone who has experienced interviewing with multiple interviewers in one sitting speak to differences they've noticed between this and the more typical one-on-one interview?  I will be talking with pairs of attorneys and wonder if the social dimensions are significantly different.

1LMan

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Re: Two Interviewers v. One of me
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2008, 04:54:29 PM »
No offense, but are you a robot?  Just curious lol.

I mean dude, just talk to both people.  One will ask a question, then usually the other.  Be sure to make eye contact with both and direct your answer at both of them, not only the one asking the question. 

It's not rocket science.....

bossfan2

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Re: Two Interviewers v. One of me
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2008, 05:53:54 PM »
I've actually enjoyed interviews more when there are multiple interviewers.  They seem more relaxed.  Remember, some of the tension in interviews comes from the interviewer--maybe they are more relaxed when they are joined by someone they already know...

The only difficulty is making sure that two people look interested and not bored, rather than just one. :)

vaplaugh

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Re: Two Interviewers v. One of me
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2008, 06:02:01 PM »
The above is true... Also, I've noticed in multiple-person interviews that if one interviewer asks an awkward question, the other interviewer may jump in keep the interview going smoothly.

Peaches

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Re: Two Interviewers v. One of me
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2008, 09:43:42 PM »
If one person is a "character" or monopolizes the conversation, the other attorney may be watching to see how you interact with other people generally or specifically someone strange/difficult/hard-to-get-a-word-in-edgewise with...

kerminsky

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Re: Two Interviewers v. One of me
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2008, 10:57:39 PM »
If one person is a "character" or monopolizes the conversation, the other attorney may be watching to see how you interact with other people generally or specifically someone strange/difficult/hard-to-get-a-word-in-edgewise with...

Good point.

Yeah, in general I imagined a two on one would be a little more relaxed, especially since three people are able to keep a conversation going more easily than two.  I was just a little wary of why they arranged it this way.  I suppose it's so that I'm not there for eight hours, or however long it would take to talk individually with each of the many attorneys I am scheduled.


thorc954

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Re: Two Interviewers v. One of me
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2008, 11:01:56 PM »
Can anyone who has experienced interviewing with multiple interviewers in one sitting speak to differences they've noticed between this and the more typical one-on-one interview?  I will be talking with pairs of attorneys and wonder if the social dimensions are significantly different.

only problem i have run into with this is when there is a partner and an associate.  when it is two partners or two associates, its just carrying on a conversation. 

When they do the partner and associate, you feel like you should talk more to the partner out of respect, but then they always put a gorgeous associate with them, so you want to talk to her more.  Ya gotta make sure you seem respectful to the partner but that you arent treating the associate rude at all.  Outside that context, just ask questions evenly and answers questions that are asked.