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Author Topic: Law Review Managing Board  (Read 961 times)

eli250

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Law Review Managing Board
« on: January 24, 2008, 11:24:39 PM »
how important is it for federal clerkships? 

if one doesn't want to clerk and already has a good 2L summer job is there any other reason to do it?

Alamo79

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Re: Law Review Managing Board
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2008, 09:27:04 AM »
how important is it for federal clerkships? 

if one doesn't want to clerk and already has a good 2L summer job is there any other reason to do it?

For the love of bluebooking.

For the chance to look down your nose a bit more condescendingly at the rest of your pedestrian, non-law-review classmates.

To continue the cycle of harassing the 2L staff the same way the board has been harassing you all year.

To check off one more item on your list of things to accomplish in law school.

That's really all I can think of off the top of my head--although if you ever want to do academia, it would help (but so would a clerkship, so I'm guessing that's not your idea).

JG

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Re: Law Review Managing Board
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2008, 11:01:40 AM »
It's extremely important for federal clerkships.  For a court of appeals clerkship, it's almost essential.  It's also a way to build relationships with people who may be able to help you down the road in your career.

Also, most people on the managing board of the law review at my school actually enjoyed it.  You work closely with people, become friends with people you might not otherwise, and become part of an often close-knit community within the law school.  And you might actually enjoy the work itself (it's not all bluebooking; some people don't bluebook at all). 

GA-fan

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Re: Law Review Managing Board
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2008, 05:26:58 PM »
I'm currently a managing editor- don't get me wrong, it's a ton of work (I'm procrastinating an edit due Monday right now). But my motivation for doing it is twofold: first, the experience makes you a better writer and editor of your own work (valuable no matter what kind of law you want to practice); second, I believe it looks better when you consider lateralling firms down the road- it's really just another thing to distinguish your resume. So far, it's been rewarding, even if it has worked me to death.

Dr. Balsenschaft

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Re: Law Review Managing Board
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2008, 06:08:55 PM »
What exactly is considered the managing board? Editor-in-Chief, managing editor, & executive editor? I'm just shooting for Articles Editor so I can say I was an editor on law review. The extra work for one of the top positions on law review seems like too much effort for very little benefit. I want my 3L year to be as easy as possible so I can maintain my class rank and GPA while catching up on all that crappy television I missed during my first two years of law school.   

jacy85

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Re: Law Review Managing Board
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2008, 06:55:47 PM »
Executive board, at least on my journal, includes the editor-in-chief, the executive articles editor, the executive managing editor (who oversees cite-checking), and the executive notes and comment editor.

All of these positions (except EIC who oversees everyone) have all the other 3L journal staff working for them.  So if you're just a regular articles editor, you're probably not considered an executive board member.  You're considered a regular board member, or staff member.

Budlaw

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Re: Law Review Managing Board
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2008, 03:25:25 AM »
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