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Author Topic: structure of answer  (Read 3161 times)

1Lchica

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2007, 10:14:05 AM »
I spend 5-10 minutes reading the fact pattern then briefly answering it.  I dont outline an answer before going in to it.  I have friends that love that approach, but it just doesnt make sense to me.  I just read the fact pattern, type the issues up that need to be addressed (I do this in advance so that I dont forget an issue and so I can figure out a time allotment for each problem), then I go to work.  Most of my friends follow 2LMan's advice, some take a little longer even, but do what works for you.  For me, I have the issues typed up, then I flip to my outline and copy the rule part, and go from memory on the application.  The conclusion is BS, but I just make that up when I get to the end based on which arguments I found more persuasive or what view point the question was coming from.

That sounds so easy, and I try to do that, but it seems like there are issues within other issues and I get all scrambled up, not knowing what to do.

thorc954

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2007, 10:15:57 AM »
yea, you probably need to outline the answer in more detail then.  different things work better for different people.

juliemccoy

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2007, 12:03:19 PM »
I had the most trouble with the one exam that we were required to hand write (the professor is a little old-school). I also type out the issues and make notes as I go along. I agree, everyone has to find the system that works best for them
Vanderbilt 2010

thorc954

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2007, 03:30:26 PM »
I had the most trouble with the one exam that we were required to hand write (the professor is a little old-school). I also type out the issues and make notes as I go along. I agree, everyone has to find the system that works best for them

owww... thats got to be painful.  I would require so much icy hot for my hands after that exam...

Sparkz1920

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2007, 09:41:35 PM »
I wrote all my exams, using at least 4 blue books for all of them except research


thorc954

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2007, 09:49:24 PM »
I wrote all my exams, using at least 4 blue books for all of them except research



double space one sided? I almost feel like giving you my old lap top :) I couldnt do it

juliemccoy

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #16 on: December 26, 2007, 02:48:46 PM »
I had the most trouble with the one exam that we were required to hand write (the professor is a little old-school). I also type out the issues and make notes as I go along. I agree, everyone has to find the system that works best for them

owww... thats got to be painful.  I would require so much icy hot for my hands after that exam...

I walked out of there with my hands and head hurting! And I wasn't the only one! Most of my classmates commented that they felt the same way.
Vanderbilt 2010

brightline

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2007, 08:54:20 AM »
This is exactly why you should've done LEEWS. It would've helped you outline and organize your answer instead of getting "scrambled up".

I'd strongly recommend doing the program over winter break. I assume you are on winter break now, so get to it...



That sounds so easy, and I try to do that, but it seems like there are issues within other issues and I get all scrambled up, not knowing what to do.

Jumboshrimps

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2007, 10:53:23 AM »
I am utterly dependent on word processing to give my exam answers some sort of structure. I generally "regurgitate" my answer in a stream of consciousness fashion, as others have said. Then, I go back and cut and paste the paragraphs in a logical order. This is one reason I am absolutely convinced that typing an exam provides a MAJOR advantage.

As far as outlining before writing goes, after five semesters of exams I must say that outlining before writing is a lost cause for me, and I'm not convinced that it is a good idea for most exams. You have a limited amount of time to gather points like easter eggs. I see no reason you can't chart your path while you're already on it, assuming you know the material reasonably well. Its like using GPS instead of a map. 

So, I just make notes in the margins of the fact patterns as I read it through twice, then start writing.

unlvcrjchick

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Re: structure of answer
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2008, 03:07:47 AM »
I am utterly dependent on word processing to give my exam answers some sort of structure. I generally "regurgitate" my answer in a stream of consciousness fashion, as others have said. Then, I go back and cut and paste the paragraphs in a logical order. This is one reason I am absolutely convinced that typing an exam provides a MAJOR advantage.

As far as outlining before writing goes, after five semesters of exams I must say that outlining before writing is a lost cause for me, and I'm not convinced that it is a good idea for most exams. You have a limited amount of time to gather points like easter eggs. I see no reason you can't chart your path while you're already on it, assuming you know the material reasonably well. Its like using GPS instead of a map. 

So, I just make notes in the margins of the fact patterns as I read it through twice, then start writing.

Agreed; outlining doesn't work for me either, and I'm soon to begin my last semester of law school.  The few times I truly tried to put a good-faith effort into outlining, I noticed that I ended up getting so obsessed over the outline that I was wasting precious minutes on the exam itself, a result that defeated the whole purpose of outlining in the first place. 

I also find writing in the margins to be more effective than outlining.  It's nice to see someone else who doesn't swear by outlining, as if it's the only way to do well on exams...