Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Using your outline on finals  (Read 924 times)

redjay

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • View Profile
Using your outline on finals
« on: December 07, 2007, 07:23:21 PM »
It seems like a lot of schools allow student to use their outlines for exams...am I wrong in assuming that?

My school doesn't (for the most part) allow you to bring anything into the exam...

So what's the general rule, most schools allow outlines on the exam or no?

Luigi rules

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2007, 07:39:45 PM »
I think, in general, the further down in the rankings the school is the more likely its profs are to have closed book exams.

redjay

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2007, 07:41:31 PM »
further down as in T3/T4...or as in not T25?

Dr. Balsenschaft

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 152
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2007, 08:14:27 PM »
further down as in T3/T4...or as in not T25?

I'm pretty sure the other poster was just making fun of you. Whether you can bring anything into an exam is entirely up to the professor, it has nothing to do with the school as far as I know. The only general rule is that most sane professors are going to at least allow you to bring your rule book to a Civ Pro exam or any other exam in a code-based class for that matter.

Luigi rules

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2007, 09:06:57 PM »
further down as in T3/T4...or as in not T25?

I'm pretty sure the other poster was just making fun of you. Whether you can bring anything into an exam is entirely up to the professor, it has nothing to do with the school as far as I know. The only general rule is that most sane professors are going to at least allow you to bring your rule book to a Civ Pro exam or any other exam in a code-based class for that matter.

Nah, i wasn't being a jerk. I know that, in general, there are VERY few closed book exams at T14 schools and there seem to be lots at lower tiered schools.  I've never conducted any studies or anything though....

GA-fan

  • Guest
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2007, 10:57:55 PM »
Doesn't really matter whether it's open or closed book. You probably won't have time to refer to your outline often- it's more like a safety net... I do notice I'll refer to a rulebook or statutes, but usually just to verify the wording which would determine the outcome of a problem. I rarely use them. Most exams are time pressured and you simply won't get much usage out of your outline if you want to complete the exam.

jacy85

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 6859
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2007, 08:07:36 AM »
Doesn't really matter whether it's open or closed book. You probably won't have time to refer to your outline often-


Absolutely not true for many people, and to be honest, its still a bit beyond me to figure out why people find it to be otherwise.  If I can bring it into the exam, I use it and I use it often, and I've never done poorly on an exam.

lawmama09

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 132
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2007, 08:39:06 AM »
I only had one final in my 1L year that was closed book (torts) and I am not sure any upper level classes are closed book.

FWIW, I agree with Jacy 85, I usually use my outline during finals to double check things and remind myself of certain ideas. It's helpful on multiple choice exams too if you are stuck.

uh huh.

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 121
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2007, 09:47:04 AM »
I think, in general, the further down in the rankings the school is the more likely its profs are to have closed book exams.

I am at a non- T25, and I also find this to be true. I believe the professors think they are doing the students a favor for the Bar exam by forcing them to "learn" the material up front (as one professor told my 1L class, "The Bar Exam is not open book.") I find, however, that I have a far deeper understanding of the material for the few open-book subjects that I had, and I am sure that the quality of my answers on those exams was much higher.  Not really sure why that is . . . perhaps I spent more time learning how to apply the law, rather than just memorizing it.

thorc954

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 376
    • View Profile
Re: Using your outline on finals
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2007, 10:07:06 AM »
I think, in general, the further down in the rankings the school is the more likely its profs are to have closed book exams.

I am at a non- T25, and I also find this to be true. I believe the professors think they are doing the students a favor for the Bar exam by forcing them to "learn" the material up front (as one professor told my 1L class, "The Bar Exam is not open book.") I find, however, that I have a far deeper understanding of the material for the few open-book subjects that I had, and I am sure that the quality of my answers on those exams was much higher.  Not really sure why that is . . . perhaps I spent more time learning how to apply the law, rather than just memorizing it.

I at a top 25 and most are open book with an exception of the occasional torts or evidence class.  I wouldnt be able to survive without it.  I use my outline during the entire exam.  I keep it mad organized and flip to a section.  I dont see why anyone would risk forgetting part of a rule or a tiny exception by trying to go from memory if they do not have to.  to each his own though.