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Author Topic: Tips for Final Exams (Torts)  (Read 2059 times)

Prizark

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Tips for Final Exams (Torts)
« on: November 21, 2007, 09:42:22 PM »
Does anyone have any tips for taking a Torts Exam? I took a couple of practice exams and realized that time is VERY limited. I race through the exam to include all my thoughts (whatever I think the prof is looking for). Sometimes I feel like I have to exclude some info.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to effectively tackle the Torts Exam?

Thanks in advance!

red

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Re: Tips for Final Exams (Torts)
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2007, 11:34:06 PM »
I think the most important thing for any exam, torts especially is to keep your thoughts organized. 

I recall that when preparing for my torts exam, it was most efficient to read the exam for individual torts, and then address them element by element, applying IRAC religiously.  My rule would be all of the elements of the tort, and any specific issues for each of those elements raised by the fact pattern.

Also, if you use headings and subheadings, you can refer back to rules that you previously stated.  That will save you the time of writing things out twice.


Prizark

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Re: Tips for Final Exams (Torts)
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2007, 07:53:56 PM »
Thanks!!! Does anyone else have any suggestions?

thatdamnsasquatch

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Re: Tips for Final Exams (Torts)
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2007, 09:19:11 PM »
if you're taking it in a blue book, sketch out some notes or a like mini-outline right there on the first page before you start writing the exam.  it helps the professor see your thought process and that you're organized.

also, when you start writing, go straight to the issues.  unless your professor has made clear he/she wants a recitation of each rule of law, with complete definitions of each element, you should dive right into the analysis because that's where all the points are .  you'll still get points for knowing the rules too; in a good exam essay, you should be able to couch the rules into your analysis (parentheticals are a helpful tool for this) without wasting time writing them all out beforehand.  this might be one reason you're short on time in your practice exams.

slacker

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Re: Tips for Final Exams (Torts)
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2007, 09:46:52 PM »
Figure out an organizational scheme. Go for the big issues first. Don't waste time on minutia unless you have time on minutia.

Eg., I organized my torts exam by parties (A v. B), then within that, by the torts implicated. As someone else said, if you've given rules before, you can refer back to the section rather than repeating the rule (or copy/paste in the computer...although I thought that just took longer.)

Read the call of the question. My torts exam had an "exclude any discussion of..." but I know some discussed the excluded issue, which just wasted time and gained nothing.

Prizark

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Re: Tips for Final Exams (Torts)
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2007, 11:04:11 PM »
Yes, I will be writing my essay in a bluebook (no comp)

Prizark

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Re: Tips for Final Exams (Torts)
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2007, 11:05:46 PM »
if you're taking it in a blue book, sketch out some notes or a like mini-outline right there on the first page before you start writing the exam.  it helps the professor see your thought process and that you're organized.

also, when you start writing, go straight to the issues.  unless your professor has made clear he/she wants a recitation of each rule of law, with complete definitions of each element, you should dive right into the analysis because that's where all the points are .  you'll still get points for knowing the rules too; in a good exam essay, you should be able to couch the rules into your analysis (parentheticals are a helpful tool for this) without wasting time writing them all out beforehand.  this might be one reason you're short on time in your practice exams.

This is a good suggestion. I guess I've been to lengthy on the rules.
Thanks