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Author Topic: How about DLA piper  (Read 2494 times)

jd2bee

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Re: How about DLA piper
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2007, 04:46:25 PM »
I disagreee as to salary.  Come this next spring or soon thereafter, a bunch of firms will jump.  Pretty soon, we're going to have a two or three-tiered market salary structure and DLA will be in the middle or lower-middle of that bunch.

It'd be worth looking into whether DLA even pays lockstep salary (guaranteeing the 10-15K increases in salary by year).  Some firms don't.  People don't talk abotu this enough. 

Buyer beware...

I believe they do pay lockstep salary.  And if there is a2 or 3-tiered market salary structure, I think DLA will be at least in the middle or upper-middle of that bunch.  Bonuses might not be as high as some of the top-paying firms, but salary will be.

jacy85

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Re: How about DLA piper
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2007, 11:04:13 PM »
Just a quick aside about firms that buy up smaller firms as the primary method of expansion..
Holland & Knight still hasn't changed their growth strategy after this little fiasco, so maybe they have it under control now.  And perhaps DLA is being a little more careful with who and where they buy?  I have no idea.  But anyways, there can be some real downsides to this expansion strategy.

There's also success stories, i.e. Baker McKenzie.  Biggest firm in the world pulling off this strategy, and fairly successful to boot.

I'm not saying the strategy can't be successful; I'm just saying that more people should ask the hard questions to try find out about the firm's growth strategies and how successful they are.  While you may not get straightforward answers (I'm sure Holland & Knight wasn't telling 2Ls during OCI that they were considering closing down several newer offices b/c they were losing cash), people can look and see if the firm is expanding in major vs. secondary markets, ask about the kind of clients each office services, etc.

Better to do a little research and make sure the firm you want is managing things well, like Baker McKenzie (assuming you're right about their growth - I have no idea)