Law School Discussion

If I withdraw at the school I am at now, can I realistically get in elsewhere?

 My grades are not bad. I have one grade so far; its a midterm and I scored above the curve. I love the law. I hate my lawschool. I am seperated from my spouse and feel that it affecting my marriage. I want to quit the law school I am at and go to a school closer to my spouse, at least in the same state, in order to maintain a happy personal life. My lsat is decent. I graduated Magna Cum Laude from college. Can I expect to apply for next fall and not have other law schools look at my "dropping out" in a way that makes them apprehensive to admit me?

I would hope they will not consider it a mark against you if you decide to withdraw and reapply. However, you will likely have to include an addendum with next year's applications to address why you left the first school.

I would call the law schools in your home state and try to explain your situation to an admissions dean at those schools. See what they say. I can't think of any other way to get this information because your situation is pretty unique.

Also, note that there may be financial consequences from withdrawing. I'm not saying don't withdraw, if that's what it takes to save your marriage and personal life it may be what you have to do. BUT, figure out what the financial consequences are at your school so you can plan accordingly.

Good Luck.

We paid cash for my tuition and received some scholarship. It sucks to lose that money, but its better than loan default.

craven

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I'm a bit less optimistic; I think it always looks a bit shabby if you go anywhere, job or school, for a short period of time.  But if it's explained in your personal statement, you may still be able to get in.

It may be a good idea to schedule some kind of in-person meeting with admissions at your new target school(s) to explain your circumstances, immediately before or immediately after you send your new application(s).

Is there any way you could stick it out till the rest of the year, and then try to transfer?

Brightline is correct. You should call any school you're interested in attending, and see what they say.

I would definitely not recommend this. No guarantee that you'll be able to pull it off or even if your target school in your home state will have room for transfers. Plus, if you are truly unhappy it can and probably will affect your grades, even if you did well on a midterm. Midterms are not good predictors of actual grades anyway.


Is there any way you could stick it out till the rest of the year, and then try to transfer?


1LMan

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I would definitely not recommend this. No guarantee that you'll be able to pull it off or even if your target school in your home state will have room for transfers. Plus, if you are truly unhappy it can and probably will affect your grades, even if you did well on a midterm. Midterms are not good predictors of actual grades anyway.


Is there any way you could stick it out till the rest of the year, and then try to transfer?



I agree.  Suck it up or quit altogether.  Either way, if you withdraw, no school is going to look favorably at them.  For better or worse, law schools (or firms for that matter) aren't going to care that you had life troubles.  Many do......

juliemccoy

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Take a deep breath. Finish out the school year and try to transfer. Call/Visit the schools in the area where your spouse is right now and talk to them about your situation.

Talk to your spouse about moving to be with you.

Good luck!

Take a deep breath. Finish out the school year and try to transfer. Call/Visit the schools in the area where your spouse is right now and talk to them about your situation.

Talk to your spouse about moving to be with you.

Good luck!

i would generally agree with this, as long as what you said is the truth.  if you are just missing your spouse etc... just stick it out for the rest of the year; sounds like you'll have some decent transfer options anyway. 

BUT, if this is really serious, it is always good to remind yourself that this is just law school.  If you are having serious family problems with your spouse, take time to fix them.  I withdrew a couple months into my 1l year bc my dad died in an accident, and my family was 3000 miles away.  I do not regret for one minute taking the time off that I needed, and all is well with school now.  I finished up at my original school and transferred closer to home (and to a much better school).

again, its just law school.  try to honestly gauge how bad your situation is right now.  if you can honestly say that your life with your spouse will crumble if you stay in school right now, go take care of it.  Otherwise, try to have some fun as a 1l.