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Author Topic: addressing a cover letter...  (Read 1159 times)

chip

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addressing a cover letter...
« on: October 17, 2007, 09:03:52 PM »
I'm looking at small firms and many websites don't list who to address the cover letter to.  Do you just call and ask or email? 
"Everybody knows where the booze is, the problem is nobody wants to cross Capone."

craven

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2007, 10:59:53 PM »
I'd email and ask for who to address the letter to.  It beats "to whom it may concern."

riddle1010

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2007, 10:27:41 AM »
I had the same problem. I ended up calling and just asking the receptionist, and they usually know the name of the person that handles the hiring.

1LMan

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2007, 10:33:19 AM »
You should always be able to see who the hiring partner is or the recruiting coordinator on the website.  If not, you can call and ask.

yykm

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2007, 04:11:36 PM »
I've stuck to email even when no general email is listed.  It eliminates the posisbility of misspelling the name and having the receptionist respell the name N xs.

cesco

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2007, 09:14:20 PM »
I've stuck to email even when no general email is listed.  It eliminates the posisbility of misspelling the name and having the receptionist respell the name N xs.

I dont understand.  Even if you send an email, you still have to address that email to someone. 
2L

csloan999

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2007, 02:13:31 AM »
I've stuck to email even when no general email is listed.  It eliminates the posisbility of misspelling the name and having the receptionist respell the name N xs.

I dont understand.  Even if you send an email, you still have to address that email to someone. 

Yeah, either "To whom it may concern" or "Dear Recruiting Coordinator"...that's "someone".

chip

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2007, 08:19:50 AM »
I've stuck to email even when no general email is listed.  It eliminates the posisbility of misspelling the name and having the receptionist respell the name N xs.

I dont understand.  Even if you send an email, you still have to address that email to someone. 

Yeah, either "To whom it may concern" or "Dear Recruiting Coordinator"...that's "someone".

I think yykm was talking about emailing to find out who to address the cover letter to. I wasn't sure if it was better to call or email the receptionist. Maybe it doesn't really matter....
"Everybody knows where the booze is, the problem is nobody wants to cross Capone."

yykm

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Re: addressing a cover letter...
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2007, 08:42:16 AM »
I've stuck to email even when no general email is listed.  It eliminates the posisbility of misspelling the name and having the receptionist respell the name N xs.

I dont understand.  Even if you send an email, you still have to address that email to someone. 

Yeah, either "To whom it may concern" or "Dear Recruiting Coordinator"...that's "someone".
If the firm provides a recruiting email without someone's name, I've just sent a "To Whom It May Concern" or "Dear Human Resources" and asked for a person's name.  They don't seem to mind, perhaps even like the notion that I took the effort to find out.  If the firm doesnt list a recruiting email, I try to contact one of my school's alum (1st looking for a ls alum, then ug if no ls alum).  Sometimes they'll tell you to direct it to them and they'll deliver it to HR.  With that said, I think it's good practice ot contact at least one alum at the firm youre applying and seek out an informational interview.  This has made the biggest difference in my employment for firms that Ive emailed my materials, even at biglaw firms.