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Author Topic: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook  (Read 1252 times)

brookdale

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Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« on: October 12, 2007, 10:26:49 PM »
As a 1L trying desperately to keep my head above water I have decided to try the Law School confidential Approach.The problem is I can't quite figure out what the difference is between an outline and a hornbook.

Can you help?

Thanks!

brookdale

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2007, 10:24:07 AM »
C Can you give examples of each?

Thanks!

jacy85

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2007, 11:46:08 AM »
C Can you give examples of each?

Thanks!

First, if I remember correctly, Law School Confidential does a pretty good job of explaining what the different kinds of study aids are.

Second, Gilberts and Emmanuals are the two main brands of commercial outline.  I can't really explain what they are, other than they are in outline form (and if you don't know what an outline looks like, then I think you may need more help than LSC can give).  An example of a Hornbook is Chemerinsky's Constitutional Law book (not the text book he authored, but the other main book he has).  It's an actual book (paragraphs and all), but unlike the case book that teaches the law through cases, a hornbook just explains the law.

I suggest that you go to your library and ask if they have study aids available.  If they do, check a few out and go sit down with them for a bit.

Lampshade Punk

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2007, 12:11:07 PM »
A teacher told me to avoid commercial materials at all costs.  They don't teach to the specific teacher (obviously) and by reading those you are more apt to not juggle with the material on your own.

Mr. Roe

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2007, 12:44:00 PM »
A teacher told me to avoid commercial materials at all costs.  They don't teach to the specific teacher (obviously) and by reading those you are more apt to not juggle with the material on your own.

If you believe your teacher on this,  you are an idiot. 

KrazyNazi

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2007, 02:27:16 PM »
only get commercial study aids if you don't understand the material. 
Yale Law School - Class of 09

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2007, 02:34:40 PM »
Is it possible to find hornbooks in libraries (law and regular), does anyone know?

Lampshade Punk

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2007, 12:05:48 AM »
A teacher told me to avoid commercial materials at all costs.  They don't teach to the specific teacher (obviously) and by reading those you are more apt to not juggle with the material on your own.

If you believe your teacher on this,  you are an idiot. 

I forgot, I'm supposed to assume my teacher is lying.  what was I thinking.

kasper11

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2007, 03:32:08 PM »
A teacher told me to avoid commercial materials at all costs.  They don't teach to the specific teacher (obviously) and by reading those you are more apt to not juggle with the material on your own.

If you believe your teacher on this,  you are an idiot. 

I forgot, I'm supposed to assume my teacher is lying.  what was I thinking.

The use of supplements is different for each professor. If the professor just teaches the law, without adding any insight of their own, then the supplement can't hurt.

If, on the other hand, the professor is critical of some opinions, or is adding their own thoughts to the cases, be careful using a supplement because you will lose that.
GPA: 2.15 (3.29 after 3 years off and transferring)
LSAT: 175

Bob Loblaw Esq.

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Re: Commercial Outlines v. Hornbook
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2007, 03:46:22 PM »
A teacher told me to avoid commercial materials at all costs.  They don't teach to the specific teacher (obviously) and by reading those you are more apt to not juggle with the material on your own.

If you believe your teacher on this,  you are an idiot. 

I forgot, I'm supposed to assume my teacher is lying.  what was I thinking.

no you dont need to assume your prof is lying, but you dont have to be stupid about it either.  when it comes to what materials you use to study and how you should study, you should not assume that your prof knows best; you know best.