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Author Topic: Non-law professorship possibilities?  (Read 750 times)

bossfan2

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Non-law professorship possibilities?
« on: October 02, 2007, 06:40:24 PM »
Hi all--

I have been thinking lately that I might want to teach--not as a law professor, but as a professor at a university, either at the undergrad or grad level.  I have a couple of questions for anyone who has insight:

1. Does a law degree plus some relevant practice experience qualify me to teach, say, public policy classes or political science (assuming my experience is in those areas)?

2. The ABA has made a declaration that a JD is to be considered the equivalent of a Ph.D. for the purposes of hiring at the university level.  Of course, this is the ABA, in whose best interest it is to have JDs seen as high-level academics.  Does anyone have any experience with university hiring policies regarding any sort of JD-PhD equivalence? 

I am a 2L at a tier 2 school with decent (top 20%) grades, if that's relevant.  I know I won't be a law professor with those stats, but I'm not sure how important they are to a liberal arts-type professor gig.

Thanks!

txlawstu

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Re: Non-law professorship possibilities?
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2007, 07:08:28 PM »
I had a professor that was a JD and that is how he was a Dr. and able to teach and eventually become head of the department.

xferlawstudent

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Re: Non-law professorship possibilities?
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2007, 07:19:45 PM »
I had a few JDs teaching in college; one taught business law, one taught a political sci class that focused on criminal law.  However, both were practicing attorneys before they taught.

vaplaugh

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Re: Non-law professorship possibilities?
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2007, 08:02:59 PM »
Try to get published while you're practicing.

You'll never really be in the "doctor" club with a JD.  (At least, that was the impression from my school).

bossfan2

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Re: Non-law professorship possibilities?
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2007, 08:29:45 PM »
Cool, thanks.  I wasn't really hoping for the "Doctor" club--just want to know if I need to go back to school AGAIN if I ever want to teach. :)  Thanks for all the input!

thorc954

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Re: Non-law professorship possibilities?
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2007, 10:23:28 PM »
Cool, thanks.  I wasn't really hoping for the "Doctor" club--just want to know if I need to go back to school AGAIN if I ever want to teach. :)  Thanks for all the input!

I wanna be in the "doctor" club.

I am considering the same thing in the future.  I wanted to hear the advice as well.  something I was considering doing was being one of the part time law faculty after graduation.  I know a lot of practitioners in my city teach at the law schools at night in the legal writing classes or at the night school and i figured this couldnt hurt to get a foot in the door in the teaching field and eventually go to a university full time. 

DO/JD

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Re: Non-law professorship possibilities?
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2007, 11:14:45 PM »
I have seen some attorneys teaching the law classes required of medical students in medical school, you may want to inquire there too if interested.



Hi all--

I have been thinking lately that I might want to teach--not as a law professor, but as a professor at a university, either at the undergrad or grad level.  I have a couple of questions for anyone who has insight:

1. Does a law degree plus some relevant practice experience qualify me to teach, say, public policy classes or political science (assuming my experience is in those areas)?

2. The ABA has made a declaration that a JD is to be considered the equivalent of a Ph.D. for the purposes of hiring at the university level.  Of course, this is the ABA, in whose best interest it is to have JDs seen as high-level academics.  Does anyone have any experience with university hiring policies regarding any sort of JD-PhD equivalence? 

I am a 2L at a tier 2 school with decent (top 20%) grades, if that's relevant.  I know I won't be a law professor with those stats, but I'm not sure how important they are to a liberal arts-type professor gig.

Thanks!

jacy85

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Re: Non-law professorship possibilities?
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2007, 07:07:34 AM »
If you just want to teach a couple classes somewhere, then you can probably do it at a crap college with a JD.  To teach some "law" classes, you probably need to have practiced for some time.  If you'd like to be tenured and be a "real" professor, you're going to need a PhD, and then struggle, struggle, struggle.  There are far too many poli sci PhDs, and far too few teaching positions.

Good luck.