Law School Discussion

what do you think?

what do you think?
« on: September 06, 2007, 01:45:54 PM »
im reading the cases, not briefing the cases and not taking extensive notes in class.  i plan on studying the outlines i got from upperclassmen, and making my own version of it.  i plan on just studying these outlines and whatever notes i have, right from the beginning.  and then i plan on practicing exams as soon as im able to.

what do you think

Re: what do you think?
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2007, 01:57:07 PM »
This technique will guarantee a 4.0, Law Review, Order of the Coif, and a SCOTUS Clerkship.

Write a book on these techniques, it will be a best seller.

Re: what do you think?
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2007, 02:03:27 PM »
sarcasm eh? oh well.

Re: what do you think?
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2007, 02:43:45 PM »

what do you think

insanity abounds.  You really trust someone else to know what is important or not?  Do you really think they put everything in their outline?  You should be taking your own notes and using other outlines as guides.  But hey, you  might get lucky, that or your classmates will love you for the low grade hit you will take.

jacy85

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Re: what do you think?
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2007, 05:14:09 PM »
What we think doesn't matter, since it might work for you.

I will throw an opinion out there though, just so you know you've thought it all through.  By doing so little work (pretty much reading only, no note taking), you may be hurting yourself so badly you can't recover this semester.  My take was it was always better to try to do a little bit more work than I thought was necessary.  It's easier to stop doing some work later than realize a month away from exams that you did far to little work in learning the material.

Re: what do you think?
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2007, 07:33:32 PM »
My Personal Take:

Bad idea.

The only thing you should use those outlines for is to figure out how to make a law school outline or see if you missed something crucial, or maybe see another take on how to say the essentially the same thing you already wrote in your notes or outline.

Now, you don't need to write down everything the prof says, but depending on your profs, you may want to take notes. Sometimes I would leave class with only a page of notes. Sometimes I had 7 or 8 pages of notes. Basically, the more time the prof spent on black letter law, the more notes I took.

If this is the approach you want to take, i.e. less time on cases, you need to spend more time on something else that will help you learn the basic blackletter law. The problem with the upperclassmens' outlines is that they're probably way too skeletal for you to understand at this point. So, start with baby steps. I recommend the Examples and Explanations series for most classes.

You might want to also take a look at LEEWS or Delaney's exam book if you want to try to develop some exam skills.



im reading the cases, not briefing the cases and not taking extensive notes in class.  i plan on studying the outlines i got from upperclassmen, and making my own version of it.  i plan on just studying these outlines and whatever notes i have, right from the beginning.  and then i plan on practicing exams as soon as im able to.

what do you think

Re: what do you think?
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2007, 08:32:35 PM »

im reading the cases, not briefing the cases and not taking extensive notes in class.  i plan on studying the outlines i got from upperclassmen, and making my own version of it.  i plan on just studying these outlines and whatever notes i have, right from the beginning.  and then i plan on practicing exams as soon as im able to.

what do you think


if only you could imagine whatta think

agrooth

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Re: what do you think?
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2007, 02:33:46 PM »
I think you can probably get by with not briefing cases.

Using your notes as a base and referring to other peoples' outlines to help compile an outline can be helpful.

The other way around as, you propose (that is, a base of others' outlines, using your notes as a reference to compile an outline), can be risky.

Also, you don't mention commercial study aids. I believe commercial study aids can be helpful in compiling your outline.

LVP

Re: what do you think?
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2007, 08:41:58 PM »
im reading the cases, not briefing the cases and not taking extensive notes in class.  i plan on studying the outlines i got from upperclassmen, and making my own version of it.  i plan on just studying these outlines and whatever notes i have, right from the beginning.  and then i plan on practicing exams as soon as im able to.

what do you think

Mainly, I think it doesn't matter what people say.  You know people are going to say "Oh it's a bad idea," "It won't work," "It might work, but probably not," etc.  Even though you already know this, you made up your mind.

So, you know, good luck.  It might work, but probably not.  If it doesn't, at least your As will go to a few of your classmates, so that's nice of you.  If it does work, then I guess stick with it.

Here's a piece of advice that I hope you do pay attention to: If you find that this strategy doesn't work, don't stick with it.  I've seen students do poorly fall semester, then do the same stuff spring semester, and, big surprise, do just as badly or worse.  It's foolish; avoid it.

Re: what do you think?
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2007, 01:20:43 AM »
This is a godsend for your classmates. They should send you thank you gifts for padding the bottom.  :)

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