Law School Discussion

Importance of Law Review for those interested in public interest/crim law

eli250

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I hear you about not wanting to do write on though.  I just got the packet today: 10 page memo plus a really long blue-book exercise just to try to get on.  Luckily, at UGA we have a couple of journals too so 90 or so people make it onto something

jd06

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I heard public defender jobs are a lot more competitive than you'd think considering the pay sucks. 

Also, here in Atlanta they just laid off s ton of public defenders because of budget crunches. 

That's true.  People want the extensive trial experience.  For good reason.  It's $$$ once you bounce out into private practice. 

Couldn't agree more.

When you go out into practice, there are 2 questions that you will get asked everywhere you go:

1. where did you go to law school?
2. did you make law review?

Irrespective of the field of law you plan to go into, these two things will follow you around and, as many people have noted here, will open doors for you that are not open to others.  It is definitely worth the 1 or 2 weeks of aggravation that you will have to put up with right now when you consider the benefits you will receive for years to come once you start practicing.


Totally disagree.  You will get asked those questions during an interview but, as a practicing attorney, I can tell you I rarely get asked where I went to school and I NEVER get asked whether or not I was on law review.  Both are largely irrelevant when you're "in the trenches."  It's all about your lawyering skills, your work product, and your performance in the courtroom.  Believe me, you tear it up in court and no one gives a crap where you went to school..... 




I completely agree with this statement, once you are practicing.  In practice, it is all about results.  After your first job, no one will give a *&^% where you went and what you did.  If you kick ass in court, or are a great transactional attorney, no one cares about law review.  But there is no way you can deny that for your first job before any type of work, it can help.

Couldn't agree more.

When you go out into practice, there are 2 questions that you will get asked everywhere you go:

1. where did you go to law school?
2. did you make law review?

Irrespective of the field of law you plan to go into, these two things will follow you around and, as many people have noted here, will open doors for you that are not open to others.  It is definitely worth the 1 or 2 weeks of aggravation that you will have to put up with right now when you consider the benefits you will receive for years to come once you start practicing.


Totally disagree.  You will get asked those questions during an interview but, as a practicing attorney, I can tell you I rarely get asked where I went to school and I NEVER get asked whether or not I was on law review.  Both are largely irrelevant when you're "in the trenches."  It's all about your lawyering skills, your work product, and your performance in the courtroom.  Believe me, you tear it up in court and no one gives a crap where you went to school..... 





Well no kidding. I had to go back and look at how I worded that and I see I may not have been very clear.  So let me clarify by saying WITH RESPECT TO YOUR LEGAL EDUCATION there are generally only 2 things employers are concerned with...

Of course when you are practicing the most relevant question is "so...where did you last work and what did you do there?" or something to that effect, and during your time of employment I couldn't agree more with what jd06 said here. No matter what school you came from or what law review or moot court you made or didn't make, if you can't produce results its game over.

Couldn't agree more.

When you go out into practice, there are 2 questions that you will get asked everywhere you go:

1. where did you go to law school?
2. did you make law review?

Irrespective of the field of law you plan to go into, these two things will follow you around and, as many people have noted here, will open doors for you that are not open to others.  It is definitely worth the 1 or 2 weeks of aggravation that you will have to put up with right now when you consider the benefits you will receive for years to come once you start practicing.


Totally disagree.  You will get asked those questions during an interview but, as a practicing attorney, I can tell you I rarely get asked where I went to school and I NEVER get asked whether or not I was on law review.  Both are largely irrelevant when you're "in the trenches."  It's all about your lawyering skills, your work product, and your performance in the courtroom.  Believe me, you tear it up in court and no one gives a crap where you went to school..... 




I completely agree with this statement, once you are practicing.  In practice, it is all about results.  After your first job, no one will give a *&^% where you went and what you did.  If you kick ass in court, or are a great transactional attorney, no one cares about law review.  But there is no way you can deny that for your first job before any type of work, it can help.

Utlimately your skills will be what matters in practice, but your academic credentials -- i.e. your school, grades, law review, etc. -- will matter for several years after you graduate.  This is because most people simply won't be able to develop a lot of truly impressive experience in the first few years of practice.  This talk of kicking ass in the courtroom is at odds with the responsibilities given most young lawyers -- how many first and second year associates at even medium and small firms are handling trials by themselves?  It takes time to be even given the opportunity  to "kick ass in court," and until then, employers are going to look fairly closely at your academic record. 

So, to the OP: do the write on.