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Author Topic: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?  (Read 1538 times)

StevePirates

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2007, 02:16:47 PM »
I'm a fulltimer.  The ABA rules say I can't work much, not that I can't work at all.  My specific school limits 1L's to 5 hours of work per week.  And I intend to go from a full time paralegal to a 5 hour a week law clerk at the firm I currently work for.

djdvine

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2007, 07:36:11 PM »
Keep in mind the ABA prohibits you from working 1L year.

Most people come to law school with some idea what they're interested in. I'd dare go as far as saying if there's not something about law that you're passionate about (not necessarily a practice area, but something that intrigues you), you're going to hate law school.

That said, the biggest decision I've had is litigation or transactional work. This will probably be your earliest decision and what (in the short run as a young associate) will most determine your career choices. Second after that is civil or criminal. If you can narrow it down that far as a 1L, you'll be ahead of most of your classmates. I started with a general notion of being interested in business/corporate law, maybe securities. The great news is most employers won't lock you into a choice like that until after you've interned for the summer and given it a test-run. You might find that litigation seems particularly interesting during class, but when you go to your summer firm and start writing memos and motions you could find that it's really not your bag.

Definitely start with a road map, but never feel locked into that map if you change your mind.

Thanks for the advice...I think that is my problem: I'm passionate about many areas of the law, that is why I can't decide on what I want to focus on.  I like your idea of just starting with a general road map.  I'm thinking the litigiation is a definate must...it's just a matter if it's going to be civil or criminal.  I'm hoping professors and internships will help me out with that though.
Again, thanks!
Dave

djdvine

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2007, 07:38:09 PM »
You would think it was obvious from my post that I was referring to full time students. And the ABA prohibits full time 1Ls from working, period. 2Ls and 3Ls can work up to 20 hrs per week. Part time students go part time generally with the intent of working full time while attending law school. Neither of the interested posters mentioned going part time, so what is the point of this? 
I'm definatley interested in a full-time law program.  I think I would like to focus all my efforts on school during the first year anyway...after that, we'll see.  I'll use the summer to get my experience in an internship.


unlvcrjchick

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2007, 03:28:13 AM »
You would think it was obvious from my post that I was referring to full time students. And the ABA prohibits full time 1Ls from working, period. 2Ls and 3Ls can work up to 20 hrs per week. Part time students go part time generally with the intent of working fu
ll time while attending law school. Neither of the interested posters mentioned going part time, so what is the point of this? 

You're wrong on both fronts.  It was NOT obvious, for you said that you're prohibited from working your IL year, period.  Second, full-time 1L's CAN work their first year, so obviously you're mistaken.  How do I know this?  My school told me to change to part time after I obtained a job that was for more than 20 hours per week. Plus, when I was a full-time student, I was made to sign an agreement that stated that I was not to work more than 20 hours per week.  So, get your facts straight before shooting off your misinformed mouth.

The point of this is that you need to be careful about what you say.  I have a problem with someone giving advice to someone else when that someone's advice is obviously wrong.  Yes, you may think that it was obvious that you were referring to just full-time students, but that is not so and you should have qualified as such.  Haven't you learned anything in law school?  Never assume anything. 

DCrell

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2007, 07:04:26 PM »
I don't know what school you'd like to go to, but if you want to do litigation, check out Michigan State. They have a trial practice program. It is taught by practicing lawyers. You learn ho to interview clients, take depositions, and all the other real-world stuff you do when you have a job. You also spend 2 semesters actually at trial. You are the lead attorney. Real judges sit in and there is a real jury and witnesses, and all that jive.
Also, it isn't hard to get a public defender externship. Not sure about prosecutor, but I wouldn't imagine it is that much harder.

GA-fan

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2007, 07:48:41 PM »
You would think it was obvious from my post that I was referring to full time students. And the ABA prohibits full time 1Ls from working, period. 2Ls and 3Ls can work up to 20 hrs per week. Part time students go part time generally with the intent of working fu
ll time while attending law school. Neither of the interested posters mentioned going part time, so what is the point of this? 

You're wrong on both fronts.  It was NOT obvious, for you said that you're prohibited from working your IL year, period.  Second, full-time 1L's CAN work their first year, so obviously you're mistaken.  How do I know this?  My school told me to change to part time after I obtained a job that was for more than 20 hours per week. Plus, when I was a full-time student, I was made to sign an agreement that stated that I was not to work more than 20 hours per week.  So, get your facts straight before shooting off your misinformed mouth.

The point of this is that you need to be careful about what you say.  I have a problem with someone giving advice to someone else when that someone's advice is obviously wrong.  Yes, you may think that it was obvious that you were referring to just full-time students, but that is not so and you should have qualified as such.  Haven't you learned anything in law school?  Never assume anything. 


I'm not sure late night hours go-go dancing counts toward your hourly employment total. I know it's finals, but who put a stick up your ass?

djdvine

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2007, 08:19:13 PM »
I don't know what school you'd like to go to, but if you want to do litigation, check out Michigan State. They have a trial practice program. It is taught by practicing lawyers. You learn ho to interview clients, take depositions, and all the other real-world stuff you do when you have a job. You also spend 2 semesters actually at trial. You are the lead attorney. Real judges sit in and there is a real jury and witnesses, and all that jive.
Also, it isn't hard to get a public defender externship. Not sure about prosecutor, but I wouldn't imagine it is that much harder.

Thanks Dcrell, that was some good information.  I think I'm gonna start calling around and asking local DA offices what their procedure is for internships / externships....

Thanks!
Dave

unlvcrjchick

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2007, 09:48:01 PM »
You would think it was obvious from my post that I was referring to full time students. And the ABA prohibits full time 1Ls from working, period. 2Ls and 3Ls can work up to 20 hrs per week. Part time students go part time generally with the intent of working fu
ll time while attending law school. Neither of the interested posters mentioned going part time, so what is the point of this? 

You're wrong on both fronts.  It was NOT obvious, for you said that you're prohibited from working your IL year, period.  Second, full-time 1L's CAN work their first year, so obviously you're mistaken.  How do I know this?  My school told me to change to part time after I obtained a job that was for more than 20 hours per week. Plus, when I was a full-time student, I was made to sign an agreement that stated that I was not to work more than 20 hours per week.  So, get your facts straight before shooting off your misinformed mouth.

The point of this is that you need to be careful about what you say.  I have a problem with someone giving advice to someone else when that someone's advice is obviously wrong.  Yes, you may think that it was obvious that you were referring to just full-time students, but that is not so and you should have qualified as such.  Haven't you learned anything in law school?  Never assume anything. 


I'm not sure late night hours go-go dancing counts toward your hourly employment total. I know it's finals, but who put a stick up your ass?

A feeble attempt at humor, I see.  No one put a stick up my ass.  You asked me the point of my original non-inflammatory post, and I responded, nothing more, nothing less.  The fact that you may have taken offense to it is not my concern, and if you did take offense, then you need to grow a pair, both figuratively and, if you're a male, literally. 

GA-fan

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2007, 10:01:27 PM »
My point is everyone here turns into assholes around finals time.You try to give decent advice, and people like you seem to make it pointless. Why not just tell people to look it up themselves and do the research? Otherwise, that's the point of message boards. No need to discourage dialogue by being rude.

unlvcrjchick

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Re: What Kind of Law Are You Studying?
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2007, 10:33:19 PM »
My point is everyone here turns into assholes around finals time.You try to give decent advice, and people like you seem to make it pointless. Why not just tell people to look it up themselves and do the research? Otherwise, that's the point of message boards. No need to discourage dialogue by being rude.

I wasn't being rude.  In fact, the very act of your calling me an a-hole is rude, not to mention your referring to me as a go-go dancer.  So, I think you should practice what you preach.  I don't give one lick about finals, so quit blaming my "attack" on your post as being the result of that.  I'm so over the bull of finals and posturing that it doesn't affect me anymore.  Unlike most law students, I don't hinge my self-worth on grades and status.

I didn't say, nor do I think, that people must look things up as opposed to asking people questions on message boards.  Again, the point of my original post was to point out to people who may have been confused about your misinformation regarding students and their working schedules possibly being in conflict with ABA rules.  I was adding to the discussion, and ergo engaging in meaningful dialogue (the whole point of this message board) by correcting you, and you took offense to it and insulted me. 

In other words, I don't see how my original post to you discouraged discussion.  Your posts, on the other hand, do just that (i.e., your insulting me).