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Author Topic: "Right To Bear Arms"  (Read 58088 times)

nmla

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #150 on: May 27, 2008, 11:51:52 AM »


Reverends Michael Fleger (left) and Jesse Jackson march Monday with supporters to the Markham courthouse. The ministers attended a hearing on charges of trespassing in a June protest at Chuck's Gun Shop in Riverdale.

Surrounded by ministers, anti-gun activists and two mothers who recently lost a child to gun violence, Reverends Jesse Jackson and Michael Pfleger said Monday they will keep the pressure on a Riverdale gun shop, even as they head to trial on trespassing charges. The ministers spoke outside the Markham courthouse, where they appeared on charges of trespassing stemming from a June protest at Chuck's Gun Shop and a confrontation with owner John Riggio. At Monday's hearing, which lasted just a few minutes, attorneys for Jackson and Pfleger asked for a jury trial, and a date was set for Nov. 26.

We were not guilty of trespassing," Jackson said to several dozen demonstrators Monday. "We're guilty of trying to stop the gun flow." During the confrontation, Riggio complained to police about the ministers, and they were taken into custody. Jackson and Pfleger continued to criticize gun laws as lax and gun manufacturers and sellers, whom they blame for violence in Chicago. "We want sensible gun laws," Jackson said. "You don't hunt with M-16s. You blow holes in tanks with those weapons. They were built just to kill people." In recent months, Jackson and Pfleger, who have called for a statewide ban on assault weapons, have been holding rallies and demonstrations to highlight the toll gun violence has taken on Chicago youths. Assault weapons are banned in Chicago, but the ministers say the law is useless because people buy them at shops, like Chuck's, in the inner-ring suburbs, then bring them into the city. "They don't manufacture guns in the ghetto," Jackson said. "They make the guns, they grow the drugs ... We go to jail and get killed from them."

Pfleger said the arrest was an attempt to intimidate them. "We're not going anywhere. We're going to step it up," he told supporters. Riggio appeared at the hearing but did not speak. He declined to comment afterward. Also present was Clara Allen, mother of a 21-year-old Northern Illinois University student who was fatally shot July 20 on the South Side. Allen said the death of her daughter, Dominique Willis, while she was home on summer break, has spurred her to get involved. "I will not quit," she said. "I lost my child. When will it end?" Annette Nance-Holt, the mother of Blair Holt, spoke to the same issue about her 16-year-old son, who was gunned down on a CTA bus in May while trying to save a friend. His murder, which occurred in the early afternoon, caused hundreds of leaders and residents to rally for solutions. "We shouldn't have to live with gun violence," Nance-Holt said. "No one should have to be in and out of court because their child was killed. I'm here to keep that from happening, if I can."


Well, at least in Illinois, banning guns purchases is just a matter of time! And sicerely I don't get it what are they waiting for!
 

Procrastination, it's all about procrastination, sheraton!
T stands for Time.

florida357

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #151 on: May 29, 2008, 08:36:40 AM »
The idea that control of the population's access to guns is beneficially linked to violent crime is one of the biggest political frauds of our lifetime.


After trillions of dollars and manhours spent, the government has absolutely no control over the possession or easy flow of illegal narcotics.  Assume for a moment that a ban on guns and the ensuing war on guns would be equally successful, this means that at least 50% of highschool students would have easy access to guns.  Career criminals would have no problem obtaining them.

In fact, this is what we see in places that have instituted strict gun control: total violent crime increases.  This includes at least DC, Chicago, England, and Australia.

It is simply a fraud perpetrated by ultra-liberals and peacenik idealists.  Notably, over 40,000 people die every year as a result of DUI, yet none of you would support a ban on alcohol.  Guns are related to only 30,000 deaths per year; less than 15,000 if you exclude suicide.  Even if you make the extremely egregious assumptions that criminals will become law abiding without access to guns, that they will in fact not have access to guns, that suicidal people will not jump off buildings or use simple and painless household cleaners as they do in Japan, there is still absolutely no reason to pursue a ban on guns before a ban on alcohol.

intim

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British blue blood top 'Hottest Royal' list
« Reply #152 on: May 29, 2008, 11:57:36 AM »

The Standard learned that Diana had agreed to a week's holiday with princes William and Harry in the US. She had accepted an invitation from her one-time American boyfriend Mr Forstmann to stay with him at his house in the Hamptons. But as she was travelling with the princes, [...]


CNN) -- They're young, fabulously wealthy and have blue blood coursing through their veins. Meet the "20 Hottest Young Royals" in the world, compiled by influential fortune tracker, Forbes magazine. The magazine used the "winning combinations of looks, money, and popularity on the Web" to come up with the list, it says.



Only unmarried royals under the age of 35 were considered. The Forbes list proved to be a Royal knockout for British royalty. They came in the top four of hottest young royals in the world. With his piercing blue eyes and lantern jaw, reminiscent of a movie star, Britain's Prince William, perhaps unsurprisingly, came in at Number 1. The magazine describes him as having: "international intrigue and unparalleled media attention," combined with a "graceful public persona." Although his crown slipped somewhat recently when he was accused of abusing his newly-acquired flying skills by "joyriding." His relationship with girlfriend Kate Middleton is the subject of feverish speculation and an engagement announcement is eagerly anticipated by the British media. Seemingly always languishing in William's shadow, his brother, Prince Harry, placed second on the list.

Harry has always been known as the "bad boy prince" because of some rather unroyal behavior, such as brawling with paparazzi outside nightclubs and going to a fancy dress party dressed in Nazi regalia. However, he has latterly re-invented himself as the "Hero prince" after a tour of duty in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban in March. Sound off: Is Prince William the world's hottest young royal? William and Harry's cousins Zara Phillips and Princess Beatrice also came in at No. 3 and 4 respectively. The inclusion in the list should be good news for Princess Beatrice, who recently attracted unkind comments from Britain's newspaper columnists about her curvy figure and her dress sense. The sight of Beatrice, 19, pictured on holiday in a bikini proved too much for Daily Mail newspaper columnist Allison Pearson, who wrote: "Can't someone buy that girl a sarong? For her sake, as well as ours." This led to an angry counterattack from Beatrice's mum, Sarah Ferguson, who thundered at a news conference to promote a reality show: "Touch me, fine, but don't touch my children." The 20 featured on the list represent almost $60 billion in wealth and 15 royal lineages from around the world -- including some rather obscure names that even the most ardent royalist might be hard pushed to recognize. Princess Sikhanyiso of Swaziland anyone? Coming in at Number 20, the eldest daughter of King Mswati III of Swaziland, Africa's last absolute monarch, is currently a speech and drama major at Biola University in California.

A controversial princess who raises eyebrows in her homeland with her Western-style clothes and a decision to hold a drinking party to celebrate the end of a chastity decree in 2005 resulted in a beating with a stick. She is currently a Speech & Drama major at Biola University, California. Fourth in line to the Monaco throne, Charlotte Casiraghi, is the only non-Brit to make it into the top 5. A style icon, who is known for her impeccable taste in fashion and her good looks --much like her grandmother, Hollywood icon, Grace Kelly and mother Princess Caroline. Her brother, party prince Andrea Casiraghi, also makes an appearance on the list at Number 10. But it seems even his Hollywood lineage -- as well as his sun-kissed surfer looks were not enough to give William and Harry a run for their money in the pin-up stakes.

pig floyd

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #153 on: May 29, 2008, 09:29:42 PM »
It's statistically been proven [. . .]

Link?

While you're at it, link to statistics that show the opposite?

I'm lazy.

I hate science because I refuse to assume that a discipline based in large part on the continual scrapping and renewal of ideas is unconditionally correct in a given area.

p i l

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Princess Di’s Mom Calls Her Daughter a "Whore"
« Reply #154 on: May 31, 2008, 04:22:45 PM »

American intelligence agencies were bugging Princess Diana's telephone over her relationship with a US billionaire, the Evening Standard learned back in 2006. She was even forced to abandon a planned holiday with her sons in the US with tycoon Teddy Forstmann on advice from secret services, who passed on their concerns to their British counterparts. Both US and British intelligence then forced Diana to change her plans to stay with Mr Forstmann in the summer of 1997, saying it was too "dangerous" to take her sons there. Instead the princess took the fateful decision to take a summer break with Harrods owner Mohamed Fayed. This ultimately led to her going to Paris with his son Dodi, where they died in a car crash.



The revelation from independent inquiries by the Evening Standard came as it emerged that Princess Diana's phone was bugged by US intelligence agencies on the night she died without the permission of the British secret intelligence services. Authoritative leaks say the extraordinary revelations were published by Lord Stevens and were bound to raise fresh questions about conspiracy theories. The US secret service was monitoring Diana's friendship with the controversial financier Mr Forstmann for some weeks. Mohamed Fayed has always insisted the princess and Dodi Fayed were murdered in a plot involving MI6 agents and US intelligence.

The Standard learned that Diana had agreed to a week's holiday with princes William and Harry in the US. She had accepted an invitation from her one-time American boyfriend Mr Forstmann to stay with him at his house in the Hamptons. But as she was travelling with the princes, she needed the trip to be cleared by the British security services. They surprisingly vetoed Diana's plans because of concerns about the security surrounding the billionaire's homes or perhaps a possible threat from elsewhere. The decision by the security services ultimately led to Diana striking up her friendship with Dodi and returning to the south of France to holiday with him. This led to her being in Paris on 31 August, the day of the crash. The Evening Standard also understood that US secret services had a number of secret files on Diana and her closest associates that are held by the national security agency. The files, which included reports from foreign intelligence - thought to include MI5 and MI6 - come under both top secret and secret categories. The reports could not be released because of "exceptionally grave damage to the national security". The documents on the princess seemed to have arisen because of the company she kept rather than through any attempt to target her. Diana enjoyed an intimate friendship with Mr Forstmann after her relationship with Prince Charles had broken down.


Well, Diana's own mother called her a "whore." She didn't like the fact that her daughter had had romances with Muslim men. This was before the princess' romance with Dodi Fayed. Shand-Kydd said that Diana was "a whore and that she was @ # ! * i n g around with Muslim men."

T a s h

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #155 on: June 02, 2008, 03:36:55 PM »
So what's your point p i l? Her mother was a racist period.

buyram

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #156 on: June 13, 2008, 02:36:44 PM »

No need to get overexcited about the "right to bear arms." You have to remember that in Western democracies (especially America) the police maintains the public order with an iron hand. Just beacause you have a gun it does not mean that you will use it -- in fact, the majority of people get a gun "for the fun of it," as an insurance that were they attacked they'd be able to get back to the attacker. However, the possibility of being attacked in middle class neighborhoods is minimal and these people almost never put their guns to use. [...]


You are overlooking school shootings... what about high school kids shooting their classmates and teachers?


Good catch,, like!

premiermaw

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #157 on: June 14, 2008, 05:03:11 PM »

[...] For instance, it is well-known that in ex-communist countries journalists are beaten randomly when they publish discrediting articles about a political figure of their country. Not to mention that even politicians themselves have been treated like * & ^ % in these countries (Russia, for instance). Intelligence services' agents have beaten political adversaries of their superiors so bad that they have nearly died; or their houses have come under heavy gun fire. Assassination attemps towards high level government figures are random even after so many years of trying to establish democratic societies.


Don't get me started with ex-communist countries and their a s s h o l e politicians that you'd not even consider to wipe your d i c k with! When I was in the Czech Republic last year several politicians were caught in a scheme with them booking into hotels using faxes with Blue Chip company letterheads, such as British Airways or the BBC, and then request that the account be sent to the corporate head office for payment.


Well, dru, there are some hotels (even 5-star ones) that do not deserve a dime from you! I mean, Jesus, some of them don't have Internet access fast enough for you to be able to watch a YouTube video!

b e s a m e

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #158 on: June 25, 2008, 04:29:51 PM »


For instance, it is well-known that in ex-communist countries journalists are beaten randomly when they publish discrediting articles about a political figure of their country. Not to mention that even politicians themselves have been treated like * & ^ % in these countries (Russia, for instance). Intelligence services' agents have beaten political adversaries of their superiors so bad that they have nearly died; or their houses have come under heavy gun fire. Assassination attemps towards high level government figures are random even after so many years of trying to establish democratic societies.


Russians (and their Eastern European buddies) are uncivilized people who are unable to live under democracy -- they just can not see themselves building a normal society. Their people are lazy drunkards and thieves, who refuse to work and honestly but constantly complain about their salaries. Eastern Europeans are passive individuals, weary of change, unaccustomed to lofty motives, and prone only to deviant and deeply individualistic actions. Their vision of themselves borders on fantasy. They suppose without grounds, for instance, that their people are highly spiritual, hospitable, and ready to make sacrifices for others -- in reality they may easily be characterized as zoo animals.



Don't get me started with ex-communist countries and their a s s h o l e politicians that you'd not even consider to wipe your d i c k with! When I was in the Czech Republic last year several politicians were caught in a scheme with them booking into hotels using faxes with Blue Chip company letterheads, such as British Airways or the BBC, and then request that the account be sent to the corporate head office for payment.


HAHAHA! ;)

coin up in the air

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Re: "Right To Bear Arms"
« Reply #159 on: June 28, 2008, 12:55:27 PM »


What were the candidates' reactions to yesterday's landmark decision on gun rights by the Supreme Court? John McCain supported it, and Barack Obama ... kind of supported it. There's a paper trail suggesting Obama was for the D.C. ban, but yesterday he claimed to have "always believed that the Second Amendment protects the right of individuals to bear arms" — while also seeing the need for "common-sense, effective safety measures" to protect "crime-ravaged communities." Some think he's taking a politically expedient stance to further his goal of winning every single state in the country this November, while others believe his support of yesterday's decision falls within his nuanced view of gun control. Many others, meanwhile, think the Supreme Court just made gun rights a non-issue this election season.

• George Will believes that "Obama benefits from this decision," because, while "he formerly supported groups promoting a collectivist interpretation" of the Second Amendment, "as a presidential candidate he has prudently endorsed the 'individual right' interpretation." Had the Court upheld the D.C. law, "emboldened gun-control enthusiasts would have thrust this issue … into the campaign, forcing Obama either to irritate his liberal base or alienate many socially conservative Democratic men."

• Mike Madden thinks "the Court's decision may have shoved the gun control issue further aside — and helped inoculate Obama from it." Now that the Court has settled the collective-versus-individual-right debate, "Republican and Democratic strategists alike say it may be harder than ever for conservatives to whip voters into a frenzy on gun ownership come November."

• Andrew Romano isn't sure Obama "will actually lose this round with voters — or that McCain will win." The decision allows Obama to "reaffirm his broader beliefs" — an individual right that can still be constrained — "which have, in fact, been consistent all along." McCain will only be able to benefit politically "if swing voters (who largely concur with Obama on the underlying issues) absorb the whole confusing chronology and decide that it exposes some sort of character flaw," but "very few people will sit still long enough to find out."

• Marc Ambinder writes that it's true that Obama has long held the view that an individual right to bear arms can be regulated for purposes of public safety. But "with regard to the D.C. law, it seems clear that Obama was okay with how D.C. government balanced those rights and is now okay with the seesaw swinging in the other direction." 

• Jennifer Rubin contends that Obama is making a small problem about gun rights into "a larger one of leadership and political courage." Voters "usually can spot someone trying to have it both ways," which is what Obama is trying to do in this case.

• Massimo Calabresi contends that Obama's "sudden social centrism" on gun rights (and also the death penalty) "would sound more convincing in a different context," meaning, if he weren't trying to court "the independent and moderate swing voters so key in a general election."

• Chuck Todd and friends are also wondering whether the gun issue will matter anymore in the election. As others have argued, the "Republicans might no longer be able to argue that Democrats want to take your guns away." In addition, "wedge issues like guns — or abortion, or the death penalty, or gay marriage" — may not "resonate at all in what’s looking to be a change election." Plus, "while the pro-gun crowd is very leery of Obama, they aren’t necessarily that fired up about McCain."

• Michael Powell places Obama's "Delphic" response to the Supreme Court decision in the context of his shift to the "vital center" on issues ranging from electronic surveillance to the death penalty to campaign finance.

• Chris Cillizza thinks "it would be a mistake to assign too much political importance" to the Supreme Court's decision, as the "minds of the American people were made up long ago when it comes to guns and gun control," and "[e]xternal forces … seem unlikely to move big blocs of voters toward (or from) either candidate."

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2008/06/did_obama_dodge_a_bullet_on_gun_control.html
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