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Author Topic: Oil and Gas?  (Read 1344 times)

rosevv

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Oil and Gas?
« on: April 03, 2007, 11:54:53 PM »
Will this course confine my future practice area to oil and gas area, such as the central of the states?  Thanks!

StrenuouslyObject

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2007, 09:20:53 AM »
Will this course confine my future practice area to oil and gas area, such as the central of the states?  Thanks!

Doubtful.  I'm sure you could get a job in DC doing some lobbying/consultant work for Big Oil.  How do you think think they're constantly able to dodge the EPA. 

Also - and I'm sure you already know this - but Oil and Gas law is an offshoot of property law; thus, if you're interested in specializing in property law, I don't think taking this class would hurt.

txlawstu

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2007, 05:20:50 PM »
Will this course confine my future practice area to oil and gas area, such as the central of the states?  Thanks!

Are you actually asking if taking a course will confine you to a specific area, or did you mean to ask if specializing in Oil & Gas will limit your job possibilities by location?

Felsen

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2007, 09:54:36 PM »
Will this course confine my future practice area to oil and gas area, such as the central of the states?  Thanks!

Are you actually asking if taking a course will confine you to a specific area, or did you mean to ask if specializing in Oil & Gas will limit your job possibilities by location?

I certainly hope it is the latter.  I'd hate to think that the required Criminal Law 1L course will prevent me from being a civil lawyer.  Shoot, and they tricked me into doing Torts last year, which prevents me from being a criminal lawyer.


On the serious side, you can switch "specialties" as often as you want in law practice.  The state bar is general purpose.  That's why lawyers are able to do pro bono.  Even though I'll be doing patent law, some day some really poor person may have me trying to keep them from the electric chair.  I don't know whom to pity more, the defendant or the judge who has to constantly remind me that it is beyond a reasonable doubt, not a preponderance of the evidence.

rosevv

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2007, 11:41:51 PM »
I meant the georgraphic location of my future job. But I am also concerned with choosing a correct course in my third year. Many factors pop up for me to balance, but without sufficient knowledge and experience, I have no idea to make a decision.

Factors are:
1) I would like to choose courses with less reading assignments
2) I don't know whether international law will be worthy to concentrate on because I have limited credits left for third year, and some people told me they found out that there is no such international law practice after graduation
3) Some areas of law are locally oriented, such as oil and gas, mainly litigated in the center of the country
4) Don't know whether I should choose course only for the purpose of bar exam.

Thank you for your input and any advice.

GA-fan

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2007, 09:33:26 AM »
If you got into a respectable school and signed up for a bar-prep course, I wouldn't worry much about the bar (assuming you've taken 1L classes, plus evidence and maybe two or three other classes which are hard to teach yourself, such as corporations, tax, and estates.

Take what you want-you earned it. Third year of law school is probably a waste of time for most people and just an opporutnity to cement their job prospect rather than learning lots of new legal skills.

Budlaw

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2007, 01:57:14 PM »
Don't forget about cementing your GPA!










If you got into a respectable school and signed up for a bar-prep course, I wouldn't worry much about the bar (assuming you've taken 1L classes, plus evidence and maybe two or three other classes which are hard to teach yourself, such as corporations, tax, and estates.

Take what you want-you earned it. Third year of law school is probably a waste of time for most people and just an opporutnity to cement their job prospect rather than learning lots of new legal skills.

Felsen

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2007, 03:12:40 AM »
I meant the georgraphic location of my future job. But I am also concerned with choosing a correct course in my third year. Many factors pop up for me to balance, but without sufficient knowledge and experience, I have no idea to make a decision.

Factors are:
1) I would like to choose courses with less reading assignments
2) I don't know whether international law will be worthy to concentrate on because I have limited credits left for third year, and some people told me they found out that there is no such international law practice after graduation
3) Some areas of law are locally oriented, such as oil and gas, mainly litigated in the center of the country
4) Don't know whether I should choose course only for the purpose of bar exam.

Thank you for your input and any advice.

1.  Depends entirely on the teacher and how they teach a particular class.
2.  Most "International Law" is just a corporation doing business in a foreign country (say Germany).  The American firm hired to handle it will probably just hire a local firm in Germany and act as a go-between.  Or the corporation will go directly to the German firm.  Or it will be the reverse and an American will be doing law work for a German firm.
3.  Oil and Gas practice is not necessarily too limiting.  I believe mineral practice is also included in this, so it can stretch across most of the U.S.  Certainly places like Texas and Oklahoma will be bigger for Oil and Gas.  There are other states known for their mining operations.
4.  There are typically too many "Bar" courses in Law School to take them all.  If you try, you miss out on areas of more interest to you.  Pick the ones that you are interested in the most.  There will be BarBri or other courses to cram in the courses you miss.  Likewise, you don't want to skip all the Bar courses and have to cram in everything during BarBri.

Esq

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2007, 10:35:17 AM »
Oil and Gas was once a dreaded topic on the Texas Bar Exam (TBE), especially for those who went to law schools out-of-state. But from about 1990 until recently, the TBE essays in this area had not been as difficult as they had once been.

However, the practice area in Texas is undergoing a bit of a revival because of the high oil prices due to world events. Texas attorneys who do have significant oil and gas experience are in high demand right now. It wouldn't be surprising to see the TBE reflect the recent upsurge in demand by creating more sophisticated oil and gas essays on the TBE. 

It's true that you can't take every bar course while in law school.  If you are going to be taking the Texas bar,  BARBRI does a good job hitting the highlights in Oil and Gas law.  However, BARBRI is only a review course and it's hard to "review" something that you have never learned in the first place. I'm not saying impossible--it just takes more work. If you have never taken the oil and gas course and are concerned, there is an excellent book, entitled Primer on Texas Law of Oil and Gas law by Professor Joseph Shade. The primer is available from Lexis.  You can read the whole book in about two hours and it helps to know at least some of the oil and gas terms and concepts before you start the BARBRI course.




   

rosevv

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Re: Oil and Gas?
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2007, 12:01:49 PM »
Thank you all!  I really highly appreciate the inputs and thoughts, my basic concern is actually what is priority between taking fewer courses with high GPA or more practical courses for future job prospect. I am intending to take new york bar exam, and I found out there are many practical areas such as securities regulation, bankruptcy etc. Are those courses learned at school necessary or at least favorable to potential employer in New york? Or the gpa rank is much more important and I can study those areas of law after I get employed? In another word, is it highly possible that I can get hired with excellent grade but without taking relevant courses in that area of law? I know the best one is to get both good grades and taking all relevant practical courses that are favorable for job market, but if i have to choose, which is priority? Thank you a lot. Looking forward to further advice!