Law School Discussion

How to become a professor?

How to become a professor?
« on: March 07, 2007, 10:35:09 AM »
What are the digs?  Any insight on anything at all? 

(I'm still waiting to figure out which school to attend)

GA-fan

Re: How to become a professor?
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2007, 10:43:14 AM »
You should go to Yale, plan to clerk for SCOTUS, and be in the top 5% of your class. Any questions?

TDJD84

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Re: How to become a professor?
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2007, 11:06:21 AM »
you have to graduate from the highest possible school that you can (The higher end of of the T-14 helps), Judicial Clerkship (Federal appellate level or higher helps a lot), law review, and being the top of your class.  This is the criteria for teaching at the top schools. Most schools throughout the tier system have equally high criteria.  Although, if you do well at the school you go to, you have a good chance of becoming a teacher at the school.  How would it look if   some tier 3 school didn't hire any of its grads?  I am sure the people from more elite school will have a competitive edge over everyone else, but people from all schools have some fraction of the class that ends up in academia.  Some schools just have higher percentages. 

Ronald Hyatt

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Re: How to become a professor?
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2007, 11:25:57 AM »
Also get published early and get published often. Other than teaching, a professor's primary job is disseminating innovative legal research. If you can show that you have an interest in developing new legal thought and that you are good enough at it to get published, it shows that you have what it takes, as it were, to be a professor.

Re: How to become a professor?
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2007, 12:28:50 PM »
I agree.  I looked into this option alot and spoke with several professors.  I think the two most important factors are the reputation of the law school from which you graduated and law review/journal.  Grades in law school and judicial clerkships, especially Federal will help ALOT, but I think they are less important than the first two.

In short:  Go to the highest ranked school that accepts you.