Law School Discussion

Business Cards?

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2007, 11:28:13 AM »
Because you are a student.  It looks stupid to have business cards that say Law Student on them for the same reason you would look like a male private part carrying a brief case and wearing a suit to class every day.


I would never call a law student who handed me a "fake business card"

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2007, 12:56:47 PM »
Because you are a student.  It looks stupid to have business cards that say Law Student on them for the same reason you would look like a male private part carrying a brief case and wearing a suit to class every day.


I would never call a law student who handed me a "fake business card"

This doesn't make sense.  Lots of people who work in business don't wear suits and carry a briefcase.  That's just generalizing.  You're also generalizing when you say that only people that work in the field of business, which no one can define with preciseness anyway, can carry business cards.  My business card has the name of my school, my name, and my e-mail address.  I'm not sure why this is such a big deal to you.  Lot's of people who aren't in "business" have business cards.  I actually got my summer internship, because someone who I gave my card to wound up e-mailing me and setting up a meeting.  I think you're making a mountain out of a molehill here; they're just pieces of paper with your name and e-mail address on them.  Sheesh!

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2007, 12:58:12 PM »
I have them and use them when networking. They aren't school specific nor do they say "law student", they just have my name, address, tele, and email.

It's often socially awkward to not have them when everyone else does and agree that it's much more classy than just writing something on a sheet of paper.

So, my career services advisor was shocked to find out that I didnt have business cards yet. How many of you have them? How often do you give them to someone? What do they say besides name, school, graduation year, and email? Thanks!

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Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2007, 02:14:13 PM »
I would never call a law student who handed me a "fake business card"

You're probably not at networking events asking law students for their contact information either.  I don't go around handing the cards I have out (which do not say "student."  They simply have my contact information and my class year).  I have them for when I am speaking with an attorney or someone in the legal field, and they ask me for my contact information.

Is it more often the case that they simply hand me their cards?  Yes, it is.  But I've also been asked for my email address and phone number, and having the cards was handy and more professional than scribbling it down on the back of one of their cards or on a napkin.

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2007, 02:44:09 PM »
Instead of handing out business cards, I provide employers with a pocket size draft of what I believe my diploma will look like, and on the flip side of it is a caricature of what I anticipate looking like once I'm an attorney.

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2007, 04:43:55 PM »
All I'm saying is my Dean said NOT to to do.  He specifically brought it up.  I agree with him and think it looks silly.  When networking, I ask for cards of attorneys, not the other way around.  I am the one looking for a job and I should initiate the contact beyond the networking event.  It is not his/her place to contact me.

I have them and they have come in quite handy for me, but I do use them more with other DC-area law students rather than employers. It has been nice having them when I needed 'em.

Now thats just ridiculous.  I would laugh.

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2007, 04:59:24 PM »
All I'm saying is my Dean said NOT to to do.  He specifically brought it up.  I agree with him and think it looks silly.  When networking, I ask for cards of attorneys, not the other way around.  I am the one looking for a job and I should initiate the contact beyond the networking event.  It is not his/her place to contact me.

I have them and they have come in quite handy for me, but I do use them more with other DC-area law students rather than employers. It has been nice having them when I needed 'em.

Now thats just ridiculous.  I would laugh.

I highly doubt a Dean would say that.  Also, if your school is like most, Career Services will print out business cards for you for a small fee.  I also thought the whole point of networking was to get your information out there.  That's great that you contact them after the event, but how will they even remember you?  What happens if someone liked you and wants to offer you a position or maybe set up a meeting, but they don't have your contact information?  You're in law school, which makes you a professional and business cards make you look the part.   

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2007, 06:22:46 PM »
Instead of handing out business cards, I provide employers with a pocket size draft of what I believe my diploma will look like, and on the flip side of it is a caricature of what I anticipate looking like once I'm an attorney.

You're hilarious with the great sarcasm. I'm guessing you're one of those that wears his backpack over his suit going into an interview, kicking your mismatched shirt and tie, making fun of all the dorks that walk into interviews with their briefcases and business cards. Meanwhile, you just can't figure out why you're one of the only kids without an offer. Good luck in the future. I have a feeling you'll need it.

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2007, 08:05:45 PM »
I actually thought business cards were a stupid idea but I'm slowly coming around after reading this thread. Since I like to dwell on minutia, how do you convey your graduation year? Do you write, "J.D. anticipated May, 2009" or "Class of 2009."

Re: Business Cards?
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2007, 08:08:53 PM »
I actually thought business cards were a stupid idea but I'm slowly coming around after reading this thread. Since I like to dwell on minutia, how do you convey your graduation year? Do you write, "J.D. anticipated May, 2009" or "Class of 2009."


I would say Juris Doctor Candidate, May 2008