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Author Topic: Are you thinking about opening your own practice right out of school?  (Read 12538 times)

Susan Cartier Liebel

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Re: Are you thinking about opening your own practice right out of school?
« Reply #50 on: April 28, 2007, 01:25:35 PM »
this is probably a really obvious question, but do solo practitioners really get re-occurring clients?

for example, someone that specializes in personal injury or divorces  prob doesnt get alot of repeat business from the same people...

The reality is you would referral business from these clients which is what you want more than anything else, word-of-mouth referrals from those who feel you did a great job for them.  That is how your business is built.  In addition, they may have other matters you can handle or choose to refer out getting a referral fee if your state permits or getting cross-referral relationships with other attorneys.  It's all good.

As far as out of state, your experience doesn't leave you, the state's rules change.  Referrers will find you to refer business in that state.  However, there are challenges starting in a brand new state (if you have no connections there whatsoever) but nothing you won't be able to overcome now that you will have spent 5 - 6 years building a business...you know what you need to do as far as networking and getting acclimated. It all turns on the reasons you are relocating and the opportunities.
Susan Cartier Liebel, Esq.
Build A Solo Practice, LLC
Newly Minted or Well Seasoned, Teaching You How to Create and Grow Your Legal Practice
http://buildasolopractice.com

Follow the Construction of Solo Practice University
http://solopracticeuniversity.com

blueb73

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Re: Are you thinking about opening your own practice right out of school?
« Reply #51 on: April 28, 2007, 03:59:20 PM »
this is probably a really obvious question, but do solo practitioners really get re-occurring clients?

for example, someone that specializes in personal injury or divorces  prob doesnt get alot of repeat business from the same people...

The reality is you would referral business from these clients which is what you want more than anything else, word-of-mouth referrals from those who feel you did a great job for them.  That is how your business is built.  In addition, they may have other matters you can handle or choose to refer out getting a referral fee if your state permits or getting cross-referral relationships with other attorneys.  It's all good.

As far as out of state, your experience doesn't leave you, the state's rules change.  Referrers will find you to refer business in that state.  However, there are challenges starting in a brand new state (if you have no connections there whatsoever) but nothing you won't be able to overcome now that you will have spent 5 - 6 years building a business...you know what you need to do as far as networking and getting acclimated. It all turns on the reasons you are relocating and the opportunities.

i have to admit, your optimism is contagious!  :)

blueb73

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hey Susan,

Ive been talking to a few solo blawgers, and they are bringing me down

Apparently, the fine art of litigation seems to be fading away with arbitration.

and there goes my hopes of some nice big fat fees!

any thoughts on this?

Any recommendations on which specialties can bring in some decent $$$ and still let you sleep well at night?

thanks  :)

Susan Cartier Liebel

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Unfortunately, the information you are providing is too vague and overbroad.  It would be remiss of me to comment on what other solos have shared with you because I don't know what was said.  You will need to be more specific.
Susan Cartier Liebel, Esq.
Build A Solo Practice, LLC
Newly Minted or Well Seasoned, Teaching You How to Create and Grow Your Legal Practice
http://buildasolopractice.com

Follow the Construction of Solo Practice University
http://solopracticeuniversity.com

Strong

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Unfortunately, the information you are providing is too vague and overbroad.  It would be remiss of me to comment on what other solos have shared with you because I don't know what was said.  You will need to be more specific.

Don't forget his chilling effect.

blueb73

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Unfortunately, the information you are providing is too vague and overbroad.  It would be remiss of me to comment on what other solos have shared with you because I don't know what was said.  You will need to be more specific.

basically, they are saying that with all the new regs and rules that its very tough for a solo to do litigation work (esp in the beginning)

heres some of what one of them said...

re - litigation

There is less and less of it,other than bankruptcy litigation, probate and family law matters. The reason of course has to do with arbitration, as well as damage caps and preconditions to filing suit (such as large cash bonds before undertaking malpractice cases). Most every consumer contract, insurance contract, etc., has a mandatory arbitration clause in it.


MCVinny

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Great Blog!

Susan Cartier Liebel

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Blueb73...contact me privately on this question.
McVinny, thank you.  I try.
LawforLife....can't seem to get to your blog..tried three separate times.  Otherwise, I would be happy to look at your blog.
Susan Cartier Liebel, Esq.
Build A Solo Practice, LLC
Newly Minted or Well Seasoned, Teaching You How to Create and Grow Your Legal Practice
http://buildasolopractice.com

Follow the Construction of Solo Practice University
http://solopracticeuniversity.com

themanwithnoname

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There is less and less of it,other than bankruptcy litigation, probate and family law matters. The reason of course has to do with arbitration, as well as damage caps and preconditions to filing suit (such as large cash bonds before undertaking malpractice cases). Most every consumer contract, insurance contract, etc., has a mandatory arbitration clause in it.



um. so your question is: you hear there is no more litigation because everybody goes to arbitration, so what should you practice...? how about arbitration?

blueb73

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There is less and less of it,other than bankruptcy litigation, probate and family law matters. The reason of course has to do with arbitration, as well as damage caps and preconditions to filing suit (such as large cash bonds before undertaking malpractice cases). Most every consumer contract, insurance contract, etc., has a mandatory arbitration clause in it.



um. so your question is: you hear there is no more litigation because everybody goes to arbitration, so what should you practice...? how about arbitration?

i considered that, but not sure how it pays...