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Author Topic: Transfer process  (Read 1752 times)

KeNo

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Transfer process
« on: December 08, 2006, 08:58:42 PM »
Hey guys, still not in law school, but already looking at the possibility of transferring (yeah, I screwed up the LSAT). I have a couple of general questions, I'm hoping you guys could answer, since this is probably not the best time to bug admission offices.

1) Can you use the LSDAS service for LORs etc when applying for a transfer? I know the LSAC applications can be used, but reading at some schools I got a vague impression transfer LORs had to be sent directly, but it did not say explicitly. I would have a bad feeling about asking my professor "Hey, I need 25 letters of recommendations from you, so I can get the hell out of this place!"

2) How much is the LSAT weighed when transferring? I see that schools generally say that it counts, but how much? Would it be worth retaking even for just a transfer? I know I could score 10, maybe 15 points more on a re-take.

3) Will a transfer have any negative effect on job placement? As I understand, you generally get a "no grade" on the classes you took before transferring, so it doesn't affect your new GPA, but do potential employers look at your transcript and go "Hmm, <X> School of Law, huh?" or are you considered fully worthy of the school you graduate from?

4) Will location have anything to say on transfers? Like, is NYU more likely to accept transfers from the NYC/NJ area, or is that part irrelevant?

In advance, cheers guys and good luck on your exams :)

Edit: adding another question.
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CoxlessPair

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2006, 06:13:48 PM »
1. Yes.

2. Save Harvard, UNC, and maybe somewhere else I'm not remembering, it isn't.

3. Speaking from 2L OCI, our transfers kicked ass. Some interviewers were curious why I transfered but given the quality of firms my peers have been picked up by, I can't detect any anti-transfer prejudice.

4. Irrelevant. Just have a good reason as to why you are transferring. No one likes a rankings whore. 
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xferlawstudent

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2006, 06:53:12 PM »
I agree with all.

KeNo

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2006, 09:18:07 PM »
Thank you very much :)
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LostMyMonkeys

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2006, 12:32:16 PM »
The only think I will disagree on is the letters of rec. I didn't use the LSDAS service...some schools said it would have been fine, but several specified to send everything directly to the law school themselves. I couldn't even do the online apps with LSDAS because I was a spring transfer and the websites for the particular schools didnt have it set up for LSDAS applications for spring.
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UChi2L

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2006, 01:34:07 PM »
If you really think you can add 10-15 points to your LSAT (possible only if you passed out in the middle of a section), retake it and you won't have to worry about transferring.  Most of the top 10 schools care some about LSAT, but if you have stellar grades and good recs (I didn't use LSDAS for those) it won't keep you out.

Also, I think location of your original school matters some because it increases name recognition.  I never would have been able to transfer in if I'd come from a comparably ranked school in another state.  I was already at the worst school of any of the accepted transfers by an entire tier.
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Krisace

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2006, 11:57:52 PM »
Just a word on OCI.  As a transfer student you will have a good chance but won't be on complete equal footing with others if you go to a mid tier-1.   High tier one (i.e. T-14 is definitely different) but at a mid to low T-1 I'd say if you want a BigLaw job your chances are probably 50/50 whereas students with equivalent GPA/rank at your new school have a slightly better shot. 

UChi2L

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2006, 07:52:07 PM »
Just a word on OCI.  As a transfer student you will have a good chance but won't be on complete equal footing with others if you go to a mid tier-1.   High tier one (i.e. T-14 is definitely different) but at a mid to low T-1 I'd say if you want a BigLaw job your chances are probably 50/50 whereas students with equivalent GPA/rank at your new school have a slightly better shot. 

Very true.  Only one transfer at my new school got a job at an insane top firm ... the rest of us had some trouble.  If you want to get into any of the big "biglaw" firms in any city other than DC or New York, though, you're fine.  A friend of mine had the same experience at GULC.
I have to believe in a world outside my own mind. I have to believe that my actions still have meaning, even if I can't remember them. I have to believe that when my eyes are closed, the world's still there. Do I believe the world's still there? Is it still out there?... Yeah.

roygbiv

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2006, 01:04:57 AM »
A couple of comments:

First, you really should go to a school that you will be content graduating from. Being able to get really good grades and consequently being able to transfer is by no means a lock.

Second, while your grades do get changed into P/F, you still have to submit your class rank and transcript from your old school during OCI. At least at my school, you still have to keep the school, rank, and GPA on your resume until you get a GPA and rank from my new school. In terms of any "transfer prejudice" it seemed like to me that employers generally put the transfers 10-15% down the class from the non-transfers. So, the transfer kids who were top 10% were getting invites from firms similar to the non-transfer top 20-25% kids and so on. Although this wasn't explicitly said, that is what it seemed like when you compared.

Third, having a really compelling reason can really help set you out from the pack. To that extent, having ties to the area can help.

Hey guys, still not in law school, but already looking at the possibility of transferring (yeah, I screwed up the LSAT). I have a couple of general questions, I'm hoping you guys could answer, since this is probably not the best time to bug admission offices.

1) Can you use the LSDAS service for LORs etc when applying for a transfer? I know the LSAC applications can be used, but reading at some schools I got a vague impression transfer LORs had to be sent directly, but it did not say explicitly. I would have a bad feeling about asking my professor "Hey, I need 25 letters of recommendations from you, so I can get the hell out of this place!"

2) How much is the LSAT weighed when transferring? I see that schools generally say that it counts, but how much? Would it be worth retaking even for just a transfer? I know I could score 10, maybe 15 points more on a re-take.

3) Will a transfer have any negative effect on job placement? As I understand, you generally get a "no grade" on the classes you took before transferring, so it doesn't affect your new GPA, but do potential employers look at your transcript and go "Hmm, <X> School of Law, huh?" or are you considered fully worthy of the school you graduate from?

4) Will location have anything to say on transfers? Like, is NYU more likely to accept transfers from the NYC/NJ area, or is that part irrelevant?

In advance, cheers guys and good luck on your exams :)

Edit: adding another question.

Krisace

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Re: Transfer process
« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2006, 02:22:02 PM »
In terms of any "transfer prejudice" it seemed like to me that employers generally put the transfers 10-15% down the class from the non-transfers. So, the transfer kids who were top 10% were getting invites from firms similar to the non-transfer top 20-25% kids and so on. Although this wasn't explicitly said, that is what it seemed like when you compared.

I'd say this is about right.  Also, just to note, the transfer problems fall outside of the east coast markets.  I've seen the affect on numerous transfers to my Bay Area T-1 school.