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Author Topic: this is about money  (Read 2787 times)

Aaron12900

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2006, 11:07:26 AM »
Another option that I think might be the best bang for your years in school, although it is already to late for all of us (I am assuming) is to get your undergraduate degree in Accounting, business management . . . obviously an MBS will teach you a lot more, but your basic undergrad degree in the field will probably insure that you don't completely screw up over basic accounting, managerial issues - one of the few important business skill that there is no competing law school elective for. Also if you know you want to go into business, but don't want to take an extra year, most schools will let you take a class a semester in another college within the university for free. Obviously a lot of extra work for already busy law students but, if you really don't want to do the extra year for the JD/ MBA thing this would help. Or you could drop out, unionize a bunch of hobo's and market them as a cheap substitute for outsourcing?

Because this post was a little off on a tangent let me just say this, you could probably easily get the SKILLS to be successful in business (as discussed above) but what about the connections. After all isn't that why the  individual law school we attend is so important .  Even if you want to be an entrepreneur instead of working your way up the corporate ladder (which, unfortunately, is VERY hard for lawyers - the best you are going to do is follow the GC route which will bring to VP) you still need a lot more connections then most people think for raising capital, knowing where to sell your services . . . Note - this is a generalization as everyone knows the stories of the internet self made million/ billionaires - they are NOT normal, to assume that you can make it by jumping into a field like that is not recommended - at least if you are like me and like playing the odds and give yourself the best chance (in empirical) terms. God I love quotation marks . . .
3.6
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accepted:Tulane$$(top choice), Emory,syracuse$$, BU
Rejected: UVA, Cornell, BC
Waitlisted:W&M, UF (WTF!!)
Pending: a whole bunch of slow-ass schools!

courselines

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2006, 01:55:50 PM »
Great base for understanding business. Even more so if your thinking about IP.
Download free outlines at http://www.courselines.com

John Galt

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2006, 05:26:59 PM »
Jim Cramer went to Law School, not business school, and he had a somewhat successfull business career.

Aaron12900

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2006, 11:01:19 AM »
Yes and Judge Judy went to a tier 4 school, does this mean that the average student won't be more likely to do better coming out of NYU then NYSL (not a hit on NYSL just looking at average starting salaries)? There are always exceptions, and assuming you will be one is not a very sucessful way to conduct business.
3.6
159/168
accepted:Tulane$$(top choice), Emory,syracuse$$, BU
Rejected: UVA, Cornell, BC
Waitlisted:W&M, UF (WTF!!)
Pending: a whole bunch of slow-ass schools!

TheSunDevil

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2006, 11:13:27 AM »
Another option that I think might be the best bang for your years in school, although it is already to late for all of us (I am assuming) is to get your undergraduate degree in Accounting, business management . . . obviously an MBS will teach you a lot more, but your basic undergrad degree in the field will probably insure that you don't completely screw up over basic accounting, managerial issues - one of the few important business skill that there is no competing law school elective for. Also if you know you want to go into business, but don't want to take an extra year, most schools will let you take a class a semester in another college within the university for free. Obviously a lot of extra work for already busy law students but, if you really don't want to do the extra year for the JD/ MBA thing this would help. Or you could drop out, unionize a bunch of hobo's and market them as a cheap substitute for outsourcing?

Because this post was a little off on a tangent let me just say this, you could probably easily get the SKILLS to be successful in business (as discussed above) but what about the connections. After all isn't that why the  individual law school we attend is so important .  Even if you want to be an entrepreneur instead of working your way up the corporate ladder (which, unfortunately, is VERY hard for lawyers - the best you are going to do is follow the GC route which will bring to VP) you still need a lot more connections then most people think for raising capital, knowing where to sell your services . . . Note - this is a generalization as everyone knows the stories of the internet self made million/ billionaires - they are NOT normal, to assume that you can make it by jumping into a field like that is not recommended - at least if you are like me and like playing the odds and give yourself the best chance (in empirical) terms. God I love quotation marks . . .


Good Post +1

MBAs have connections. I think most MBA programs require at least some field experience before accepting you. At least three top 10 MBA programs near me do.

John Galt

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2006, 11:55:57 AM »
Yes and Judge Judy went to a tier 4 school, does this mean that the average student won't be more likely to do better coming out of NYU then NYSL (not a hit on NYSL just looking at average starting salaries)? There are always exceptions, and assuming you will be one is not a very sucessful way to conduct business.

Sucess in the finacial/business world coming out of a top law school is not an exception. Tons of graduates from T-14 go into the business world and are extremely successful.

kipeet

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #16 on: November 14, 2006, 05:14:41 AM »

Yes and Judge Judy went to a tier 4 school, does this mean that the average student won't be more likely to do better coming out of NYU then NYSL


Judge Judy sucks my hairy a s s h o l e ..
Just 1 (one) inch short ..

spillbeans

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2006, 05:56:46 AM »

I would say a JD is good for being an attorney, a law professor, or a poor non-lawyer.


Law professors don't make a lot of money (they pull in around $100K) In fact, I'd say it's stupid to earn a law degree just to become a law professor ...

ifididit

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2006, 06:51:51 AM »
Your right, GW, but you've to remember that there's no money thAt can compensate for the horrible effects of law school and lawyering as a career ... so, I agree with the poster to a certain extent ...

Runner-up

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Re: this is about money
« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2006, 12:34:35 PM »
 
Why do you think a great deal of attorneys eventually leave the field?  i'm not talking about public sector, politicians, partners...i'm talking about corporate eagles.  do they see the money on the other side and decide that that's the better life? 

also...
would you say that a jd is a good base for understanding the business world?  this is not a jd v. mba question.  i understand the benefits of an mba and i understand the purpose of a law degree. but would a jd be a solid foundation for eventually running your own corporate firm?

My dad went that route after only three years of practicing law. He never like the money he was making- and this was well before everyone on the planet was going to law school. He looked at investment bankers, saw the money they were making and chose that path instead.. because that was really where he wanted to be. He regretted not getting an MBA, and when he came back for his 25th graduation anniversary, when he was asked to write down some advice for current law students, it was "It's never too early to stop being a lawyer".

Needless to say, it depends on what you want out of life.