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Author Topic: The Call Back Interview  (Read 11895 times)

Marcus2009

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2007, 01:11:03 AM »
I would suggest reading the entire newspaper the day before the callback.  The first five meetings in my callback day went really well, then the last partner asked me three current events questions.  I'd had interviewing and a memo to write, etc., and hadn't read the paper so I had no clue what he was talking about.  He wanted to know my opinion about some editorial, an article in the latest issue of Atlantic Monthly, and some sports team's game.

This is the most BS interview question ever.  Do they expect you to read every newspaper and every news magazine out there?  Is it not acceptable to tell him you only read the WSJ and NY Times?  What is Atlantic Monthly anyways?

vaplaugh

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2007, 11:45:29 AM »
tag

YeShallBeGods

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2007, 01:31:30 PM »
Great info here--thanks a bunch!

thorc954

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2007, 10:08:51 PM »
anyone have the interviewers suggest that you work at a better firm first?  One told me I should split and work elsewhere and the other said he recommends people go to the much larger firms first.  It is weird to here that from a big firm, so I wasnt sure if they just didnt like me, or if they thought I could work somewhere better?

And, anyone have advice on questions.  I feel like by the fifth person, I am pretty much set on what the firm has to offer and how the people are, and I run out of stuff to say.  Maybe I am not meant to be a lawyer, but this process is terrible.  I have some huge interviews with firms that are really out of my league (my resume is virtually blank), and I am not sure how not to be boring for the 2.5 hour callbacks.

Also, anyone know if it hurts at all to chose the afternoon (non-lunch) slot verse the morning/lunch slot?  It is the only way to schedule around classes, and I wasnt sure if it would hurt me. 

Thanks for any positive feedback.

mtfbwy

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2007, 11:11:00 AM »
First off, congrats on having call-backs, let alone at places you feel are "out of your league."  Next, my two (or three) cents:

1. Any place that gives you a call-back is no longer out of your league.  Such firms didn't become as big and prestigious as they are by accident - they know what they're doing, including their decision to spend/lose money by taking the time to interview you.  (I had a call-back at, summered at, and will be returning as an associate to a firm which was, by any objective and reasonable measure, far out of my league. Once you're summering at such a firm, you will indeed notice that most of your fellow summers and pretty much all of the lawyers are very smart, with the finest educational credentials. Then you'll realize that you are actually completing your assignments to the lawyers' satisfaction and that you will receive an offer. Strange as it is and, yes, insofar as luck had anything to do with getting that summer position, you are now in "that league.")

2. Your classes be damned.  You have call backs, so you're a serious (or just completely lucky) student, so your reluctance to miss classes is understandable.  But your call-backs are the most important thing you have to do this semester (for that matter, they are the most important thing remaining in your legal education).  You either (1) attend such a high ranked school that your professors expect students to miss lots of classes due to interviewing, or (2) attend a lower ranked school where your professors (or at least the administration) should be thanking you for having so many interviews (because it reflects well on them and the school).  I would recommend scheduling call-backs on the earliest dates possible and at the earliest times available (i.e. morning, with a lunch).  Most firms extend offers on a weekly basis, and as people accept, filling next summer's class on a rolling basis.  The time during the day is really more my personal preference, but you should schedule your call-backs for sooner rather than later.

3. You need to banish from your mind the notion that interviewing means being "boring for 2.5 hours."  Because they gave you a call-back, they know that you are smart enough (on paper) to score well on your first-year exams. The interview is your chance to confirm their judgment, i.e. it's when you show them that you are (1) smart, (2) friendly/personable, and (3) have a great attitude.  These attributes correlate to one's ability to (1) learn quickly, (2) be liked by one's fellow attorneys when working endless hours together, and (3) work long, intense hours with a "please, give me more to do" attitude."  The firm will look to confirm these same three attributes next summer, with the added attribute of "good judgment" also under review.

4. The call-back, like the job, is about stamina.  You need to be just as smart, charming and enthusiastic during your last interview of the day as you were during the first.  If you run into a dull or difficult interviewer, remain smart, pleasant and enthusiastic, and just get through that interview and get on to the next.  Basically, when you get a call back (especially at the more prestigious firms), you already have the offer, but a "no" vote from a single lawyer will sink you.  Again, the interview is just a means to confirm the firm's initial decision regarding your ability. Be smart, nice and enthusiastic with everyone, from the security gaurd and receptionist to the most junior associate and most senior partner.  Also, if you go to lunch, it is usually with junior associates, many of whom will tell you that "you can relax now."  Don't.  Until you leave for the airport, you are in the interview, being scrutinized.  (And try not to forget that next summer, once the booze starts flowing and junior associates really let their hair down.)

thorc954

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2007, 12:51:46 PM »
Thank you for the advice :) I appreciate it.  I tried to schedule everything really early so I could get offers and accept something before moot court and just be done, but someone just got me worried about the fact that all my callbacks are in the afternoon.  I hate to miss the free food/extra opportunity to sell myself, but I wasnt sure if it made a difference to the hiring committee or not. 

I will try to think of it as a fun experience today. 

Thanks again

Felsen

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2007, 03:52:33 PM »
anyone have the interviewers suggest that you work at a better firm first?  One told me I should split and work elsewhere and the other said he recommends people go to the much larger firms first.  It is weird to here that from a big firm, so I wasnt sure if they just didnt like me, or if they thought I could work somewhere better?

I haven't heard this from interviewers yet.  I have heard similar advice from people who come and talk to people on campus or during happy hours.  This kind of information typically comes from firms who try and emphasize a quality of life idea.  It is typically a smaller firm that will get you into the meat of a case sooner, or a larger firm that doesn't work you to death.  They would actually like you to go to the biggest law firm that works you 60 hours a week on document review.  Then their small and friendly firm looks better, especially when you get to control your own small case in your first year.

Alamo79

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Re: The Call Back Interview
« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2007, 11:53:52 AM »
Getting the callback is the hard part. You have already managed to stand out from the many short OCI interviews as someone they would like to talk to more. The person who did your OCI is already on your side. They liked you enough to call you back, so you already have at least one vote in your favor. So just relax, and be yourself. You will probably get an offer from most of the firms that have called you back, unless you are a total tool. At this stage, the job is yours to lose.


Unfortunately, this is not true for most firms. The callback to offer ratio for big firms averages just below 50% (meaning you have a slightly less than 50/50 chance at landing the job.) This comes from LSDAS, but I can't find the link now. The odds are a little better on the coasts.

Of course, some firms expect to hire all callbacks, and others have a 10:1 ratio or worse.

This varies a lot by market, firm size and office size--check http://www.nalp.org/content/index.php?pid=146, especially the first link (Perspectives on Fall 2006 Law Student Recruiting) for detailed info on the percentage of callback interviews that lead to offers.