Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Poll

What was the difference between your average preptest score and the real LSAT?

>+5
 18 (22.5%)
+3 tor 4
 4 (5%)
+1 or 2
 8 (10%)
0
 9 (11.3%)
- 1 or 2
 2 (2.5%)
- 3 to 4
 13 (16.3%)
>-5
 14 (17.5%)
I didn't take any practice tests.
 12 (15%)

Total Members Voted: 68

Author Topic: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?  (Read 39538 times)

Troy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #60 on: July 09, 2007, 12:17:19 AM »
David, who says personal ads opened up a world he never knew existed, thinks he's seen it all. "I've met movie directors," he says, "actors, attorneys, judges, priests, clergypeople ... it's phenomenal what actually goes on." He adds that many of the men he's been involved with are, publicly at least, happily married. Though they risk having their secret lives discovered, his benefactors have dined with him in public many times, David says. "I don't want to sound holier-than-thou, but I can sit at a nice restaurant and exhibit the proper manners. Granted, there are some people who aren't educated or don't have the class to be with these people. But when I put on a coat and tie and sit down for dinner, I don't exactly look like a flaming fag."

Asked what he believes people would think about him if they read about what he does, David pauses.

"My mother knows I have a sponsor," he finally says. "She's okay with it, for the most part. She wishes her son didn't need to rely on anybody for money. She knows I'm going to school. That I'm trying to better myself. I am HIV-negative. I pay all my bills and study hard. And I happen to have somebody -- okay, more than one person -- who is very generous to me. They care about me and want to see me succeed. You can get a different answer on this from me, depending on what day of the week you ask. If somebody is thinking about doing something like what I do ... I would advise against it. It's not a healthy thing for your soul or mind. Whatever situation you get in, you're relying on somebody else for your living. No matter how generous they are, you have to rely on someone besides yourself. It could end at any moment. One or both of my sponsors could croak, and where would I be? I'd be an overaged hooker trying to get back to something."
Going to Detroit Mercy (JD/LLB)
Waitlisted at U-Oregon (1st choice)

height

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #61 on: July 09, 2007, 07:32:08 PM »


It's nothing new for older gay men to be attracted to attractive people. If they have power and position, some want a trophy person to make them look good. To a large extent, the gay community puts a high premium on physical appearance. Older people often get overlooked.


The gay community considers you old if you're 30+.

KC

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #62 on: July 09, 2007, 11:21:20 PM »

[...] He adds that many of the men he's been involved with are, publicly at least, happily married. Though they risk having their secret lives discovered [...]


I read some time ago about a gay guy who went ahead and outed his "mentor." Initially he extorted this married man and was prompted to do so for no real reson other than because the "straight" guy was in essence on a power trip. Basically this guy had taken a little bit of money but, understandably, no respect. No affection, no emotional bonds created -- while the married man just wanted sex the gay one craved for attention on his part. He told his lover's wife about their ongoing relationship and totally @ # ! * e d up his life. He even "swallowed down" a couple of his ribs being broken after the married man took revenge on him..in fact, what he did to him was nothing compared to what happened to the other guy. He was definitely not some kind of "big fish" though, otherwise he would not have ended up being extortioned and outed. Nothing like somebody who'd put a contract on someone to take revenge.

r a m s e y

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #63 on: July 10, 2007, 12:02:44 AM »

[...] He adds that many of the men he's been involved with are, publicly at least, happily married. Though they risk having their secret lives discovered [...]


I read some time ago about a gay guy who went ahead and outed his "mentor." Initially he extorted this married man and was prompted to do so for no real reson other than because the "straight" guy was in essence on a power trip. Basically this guy had taken a little bit of money but, understandably, no respect. No affection, no emotional bonds created -- while the married man just wanted sex the gay one craved for attention on his part. He told his lover's wife about their ongoing relationship and totally @ # ! * e d up his life. He even "swallowed down" a couple of his ribs being broken after the married man took revenge on him..in fact, what he did to him was nothing compared to what happened to the other guy. He was definitely not some kind of "big fish" though, otherwise he would not have ended up being extortioned and outed. Nothing like somebody who'd put a contract on someone to take revenge.
 

Extortion is always bad and criminal. It may be profitable at times but so is almost everything else that happens to be criminal. It feels good to have been paid for what might have been some fun too. But this guy might have taken a very dangerous step and possibly underestimated the other guy's desire for revenge. There are a number of people out there who would not hesitate to do much worse things than just break a couple of ribs. They might or might not be forced to face the music later on, but what good would that do to someone?

Evidently this guy enjoyed taking the path of least resistance. I would assume the guy was not getting into any relationship with somebody to give, love, care and respect. I guess the gay guy did not expect that either. He had to be dense to think the married guy would pay and love him at the same time. He would be better off dropping the "straight" dude altogether and find himself a loving gay man who would give him all the love and respect he wanted.

When my ex left me after 7 years he did so in a way that was horribly cruel, without explanation, devious, plotting, mentally torturous. He's a military queer and it would have taken me all but ten minutes to gather up documents, photos, writings, cards, you name it, and mail them all them to his Command, had I wanted to destroy his life. What could possibly compel me to do something so hateful to another person? It doesn't matter what he did to me, that I suffered for years wondering what went wrong, that I lived in fear of his (now beaten) drug problem, that I felt unwanted, unloved and rejected.

How come no mention was made of what this type of behavior did to the innocent people in the other man's life? Did they deserve to be @ # ! * e d as well? What did they do wrong, except perhaps be fooled themselves? This type of behavior is the greatest true evil of all. "I'm the best, I am going to force you to recognize me as the best, and I'm going to use any means, fair or foul, to justify my cause." Yeah, let's "out" all the closet cases. That's a great way to bring all homosexuals to live in harmony. Destroy lives, hurt innocent people, divide, divide, divide. How can a group that's so intent on celebrating diversity finds justification in creating adverse diversity? Aren't gays supposed to look at their (stupid) rainbow flag and love all people? Why are closet cases a detriment to gay people? Aren't they the ones who have to deal with it, isn't up to them to decide how to live their own lives? Why gays are so much better than others?

How come gay people get so riled up when religious fanatics go to *straight* strip clubs, take down license plate numbers of cars in the parking lot, track down the owners, and leave anonymous notes tattling on them at their own homes? We can't believe this kind of thing goes on -- but it does. What the guy did is no better.

acipe hoc

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #64 on: July 10, 2007, 01:09:24 AM »

I read some time ago about a gay guy who went ahead and outed his "mentor." Initially he extorted this married man and was prompted to do so for no real reson other than because the "straight" guy was in essence on a power trip. Basically this guy had taken a little bit of money but, understandably, no respect. No affection, no emotional bonds created -- while the married man just wanted sex the gay one craved for attention on his part. He told his lover's wife about their ongoing relationship and totally @ # ! * e d up his life. He even "swallowed down" a couple of his ribs being broken after the married man took revenge on him..in fact, what he did to him was nothing compared to what happened to the other guy. He was definitely not some kind of "big fish" though, otherwise he would not have ended up being extortioned and outed. Nothing like somebody who'd put a contract on someone to take revenge.
 

Extortion is always bad and criminal. It may be profitable at times but so is almost everything else that happens to be criminal. It feels good to have been paid for what might have been some fun too. But this guy might have taken a very dangerous step and possibly underestimated the other guy's desire for revenge. There are a number of people out there who would not hesitate to do much worse things than just break a couple of ribs. They might or might not be forced to face the music later on, but what good would that do to someone?

Evidently this guy enjoyed taking the path of least resistance. I would assume the guy was not getting into any relationship with somebody to give, love, care and respect. I guess the gay guy did not expect that either. He had to be dense to think the married guy would pay and love him at the same time. He would be better off dropping the "straight" dude altogether and find himself a loving gay man who would give him all the love and respect he wanted.

When my ex left me after 7 years he did so in a way that was horribly cruel, without explanation, devious, plotting, mentally torturous. He's a military queer and it would have taken me all but ten minutes to gather up documents, photos, writings, cards, you name it, and mail them all them to his Command, had I wanted to destroy his life. What could possibly compel me to do something so hateful to another person? It doesn't matter what he did to me, that I suffered for years wondering what went wrong, that I lived in fear of his (now beaten) drug problem, that I felt unwanted, unloved and rejected.

How come no mention was made of what this type of behavior did to the innocent people in the other man's life? Did they deserve to be @ # ! * e d as well? What did they do wrong, except perhaps be fooled themselves? This type of behavior is the greatest true evil of all. "I'm the best, I am going to force you to recognize me as the best, and I'm going to use any means, fair or foul, to justify my cause." Yeah, let's "out" all the closet cases. That's a great way to bring all homosexuals to live in harmony. Destroy lives, hurt innocent people, divide, divide, divide. How can a group that's so intent on celebrating diversity finds justification in creating adverse diversity? Aren't gays supposed to look at their (stupid) rainbow flag and love all people? Why are closet cases a detriment to gay people? Aren't they the ones who have to deal with it, isn't up to them to decide how to live their own lives? Why gays are so much better than others?

How come gay people get so riled up when religious fanatics go to *straight* strip clubs, take down license plate numbers of cars in the parking lot, track down the owners, and leave anonymous notes tattling on them at their own homes? We can't believe this kind of thing goes on -- but it does. What the guy did is no better.


We can not be sure as to what the exact motive of the guy of the story is; nor can we say anything with certainty about the way he presumably addressed his concerns about society's non-acceptance of homosexuality in general. May it be that he did not intend in the first place to get any money for the time spent with the married man? That he, in fact, engaged in a gay relationship with this man, and only later was offered money that he did not refuse? Many young gay people are lured into such kind of relationships; this way the married man did not have to committ emotionally so that he could save his marriage and not be exposed as gay -- you can figure out for yourselves how inclined to pay up such a person is!

On the other hand, it is a fact that only when many high-profile "straight" married men are exposed as gays that the society would come to embrace homosexuality as mainstream. We may pretend that there has to be some other way to make such bisexual males to come out of the closet and accept their sexuality, that we should reshape our mentalities and those of others causing as few casualties as possible in the process. Let's not forget, however, that nothing comes without sacrifice, in fact, a lot of it. For instance, we may be more accepting towards black people today than we were back in the 50s, but do you remember what was necessary to happen in the 60s to bring about the change?

Extortioning and outing are facts of life. They should not be equated with some kind of a gay crusade. In fact, many authors have explored the devastating effects of homosexuals remaining in the closet and have provided intellectual justifications for the practice of outing as a political and journalistic tactic. Michelangelo Signorile, for instance, caused furor in the late 80s and early 90s as he outed billionaire Malcolm Forbes, high-ranking Pentagon official Pete Williams and conservative political activist Phyllis Schlafly's son John. He has advocated that queer Americans come out mentioning the deleterious effects of the closet both on the closeted individual and on society as a whole.

hiliter

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #65 on: July 10, 2007, 03:14:53 AM »

I read some time ago about a gay guy who went ahead and outed his "mentor." Initially he extorted this married man and was prompted to do so for no real reson other than because the "straight" guy was in essence on a power trip. Basically this guy had taken a little bit of money but, understandably, no respect. No affection, no emotional bonds created -- while the married man just wanted sex the gay one craved for attention on his part. He told his lover's wife about their ongoing relationship and totally @ # ! * e d up his life. He even "swallowed down" a couple of his ribs being broken after the married man took revenge on him..in fact, what he did to him was nothing compared to what happened to the other guy. He was definitely not some kind of "big fish" though, otherwise he would not have ended up being extortioned and outed. Nothing like somebody who'd put a contract on someone to take revenge.
 

We can not be sure as to what the exact motive of the guy of the story is; nor can we say anything with certainty about the way he presumably addressed his concerns about society's non-acceptance of homosexuality in general. May it be that he did not intend in the first place to get any money for the time spent with the married man? That he, in fact, engaged in a gay relationship with this man, and only later was offered money that he did not refuse? Many young gay people are lured into such kind of relationships; this way the married man did not have to committ emotionally so that he could save his marriage and not be exposed as gay -- you can figure out for yourselves how inclined to pay up such a person is!

On the other hand, it is a fact that only when many high-profile "straight" married men are exposed as gays that the society would come to embrace homosexuality as mainstream. We may pretend that there has to be some other way to make such bisexual males to come out of the closet and accept their sexuality, that we should reshape our mentalities and those of others causing as few casualties as possible in the process. Let's not forget, however, that nothing comes without sacrifice, in fact, a lot of it. For instance, we may be more accepting towards black people today than we were back in the 50s, but do you remember what was necessary to happen in the 60s to bring about the change?

Extortioning and outing are facts of life. They should not be equated with some kind of a gay crusade. In fact, many authors have explored the devastating effects of homosexuals remaining in the closet and have provided intellectual justifications for the practice of outing as a political and journalistic tactic. Michelangelo Signorile, for instance, caused furor in the late 80s and early 90s as he outed billionaire Malcolm Forbes, high-ranking Pentagon official Pete Williams and conservative political activist Phyllis Schlafly's son John. He has advocated that queer Americans come out mentioning the deleterious effects of the closet both on the closeted individual and on society as a whole.


I do not think this guy did it in order to make things better for the gay married men after they are forced to come out of the closet and have a more comprehensive understanding of their sexuality..

I also do not believe he really needed to go ahead and expose the married man, were money not a factor in his decision to out him. He could have simply moved on -- there will be always enough stupid people to pay a lot of money to have gay sex secretly.

As to the "power trip" thing I'd simply remind the reader that the guy was P-A-I-D and although sometimes it hurts to be treated the way he may have been treated, he'd be better off moving on and saving himself the pain of broken ribs! After all, no matter what you may do -- even if you give your own life -- you are not going to save the world! While it is true that the society itself would be at a profit when married guys are exposed as gay, regardless of the eventual casualties, it is a fact that this way of thinking leaves one poor, predisposing such a person to victimization, basically making a stupid martyr out of someone.

They do not say in vain, "God takes care of fools, drunks and our society."
Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run fast enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals.

mle

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #66 on: July 13, 2007, 06:41:22 AM »

How come gay people get so riled up when religious fanatics go to *straight* strip clubs, take down license plate numbers of cars in the parking lot, track down the owners, and leave anonymous notes tattling on them at their own homes? We can't believe this kind of thing goes on -- but it does. What the guy did is no better.


Interesting scenario, ramsey! :)

croatan

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #67 on: July 14, 2007, 01:18:44 AM »

Extortion is always bad and criminal. It may be profitable at times but so is almost everything else that happens to be criminal. It feels good to have been paid for what might have been some fun too. But this guy might have taken a very dangerous step and possibly underestimated the other guy\'s desire for revenge. There are a number of people out there who would not hesitate to do much worse things than just break a couple of ribs. They might or might not be forced to face the music later on, but what good would that do to someone?

Evidently this guy enjoyed taking the path of least resistance. I would assume the guy was not getting into any relationship with somebody to give, love, care and respect. I guess the gay guy did not expect that either. He had to be dense to think the married guy would pay and love him at the same time. He would be better off dropping the \"straight\" dude altogether and find himself a loving gay man who would give him all the love and respect he wanted.


Exactly, this is leeching!


How come gay people get so riled up when religious fanatics go to *straight* strip clubs, take down license plate numbers of cars in the parking lot, track down the owners, and leave anonymous notes tattling on them at their own homes? We can\'t believe this kind of thing goes on -- but it does. What the guy did is no better.


While this is truly gay activism!

timeo Danaos

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #68 on: July 14, 2007, 05:01:25 AM »

[...] It is not against the law to maintain a Cunananesque relationship, according to Lieutenant Jim Duncan of the San Diego Police Department's vice unit. "Keep in mind that this is something that occurs not only in the gay community but also the heterosexual community," says Duncan. "Repeated solicitation of the same prostitute does not constitute a legal relationship. That's against the law. But the idea of a 'kept' relationship is that it is a long-term solution where one person supports the other. It's not prostitution. It may be money for sex, but usually there is more consideration shown in these long-term relationships." [...]


What a jerk!

mattachino

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Do You Think The Congressional Page Program Should Be Terminated?
« Reply #69 on: July 14, 2007, 10:10:52 PM »
Quote

SHOW ME THE MONEY!!!